The Fictioning Horror Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Powell's Q&A | September 3, 2014

Emily St. John Mandel: IMG Powell’s Q&A: Emily St. John Mandel



Describe your latest book. My new novel is called Station Eleven. It's about a traveling Shakespearean theatre company in a post-apocalyptic North... Continue »
  1. $17.47 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    Station Eleven

    Emily St. John Mandel 9780385353304

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$5.50
List price: $12.95
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Hawthorne LIT- CRIT & REF

More copies of this ISBN

The Little Book of Plagiarism

by

The Little Book of Plagiarism Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A concise, lively, and bracing exploration of an issue bedeviling our cultural landscape–plagiarism in literature, academia, music, art, and film–by one of our most influential and controversial legal scholars. Best-selling novelists J. K. Rowling and Dan Brown, popular historians Doris Kearns Goodwin and Stephen Ambrose, Harvard law professor Charles Ogletree, first novelist Kaavya Viswanathan: all have rightly or wrongly been accused of plagiarism — theft of intellectual property — provoking widespread media punditry. But what exactly is plagiarism? How has the meaning of this notoriously ambiguous term changed over time as a consequence of historical and cultural transformations? Is the practice on the rise, or just more easily detectable by technological advances? How does the current market for expressive goods inform our own understanding of plagiarism? Is there really such a thing as "cryptomnesia," the unconscious, unintentional appropriation of another's work? What are the mysterious motives and curious excuses of plagiarists? What forms of punishment and absolution does this "sin" elicit? What is the good in certain types of plagiarism?

Provocative, insightful, and extraordinary for its clarity and forthrightness, The Little Book of Plagiarism is an analytical tour de force in small, the work of "one of the top twenty legal thinkers in America" (Legal Affairs), a distinguished jurist renowned for his adventuresome intellect and daring iconoclasm.

Review:

"Not all plagiarized authors will agree with Posner's conclusion that plagiarism is an 'embarrassingly second-rate' offense, 'its practitioners... pathetic,' and that plagiarism should remain an ethical rather than a legal offense, punished by public shaming. But in a fascinating historical tour of the subject, he dismisses the idea that good art must be totally original. Shakespeare stole the plot of Romeo and Juliet, and Manet's Olympia is a reworking of Titian's Venus d'Urbino both examples of what Posner calls 'creative imitation.' But focusing on Kaavya Viswanathan novel, How Opal Mehta Got Kissed, Got Wild, and Got a Life, Posner (Uncertain Shield), a judge on the U.S. Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals and expert on intellectual property, says this was a particularly modern, market-driven form of plagiarism: Viswanathan was attempting to compete against Megan McCafferty in the chick lit market by appropriating her competitor's own words. Posner focuses a lot on student plagiarism and seems to think all students should be considered suspect; schools that don't subscribe to detection software like Turnitin, he says, are 'naïve.' Indeed, he believes publishers should, and will, begin to use such programs, concluding, optimistically, 'We may be entering the twilight of plagiarism.' It's unfortunate that Posner briefly brings politics into this important and timely discussion, superciliously accusing the so-called academic left of being 'soft on plagiarism.'" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Not all plagiarized authors will agree with Posner's conclusion that plagiarism is an 'embarrassingly second-rate' offense, 'its practitioners... pathetic,' and that plagiarism should remain an ethical rather than a legal offense, punished by public shaming. But in a fascinating historical tour of the subject, he dismisses the idea that good art must be totally original. Shakespeare stole the plot of Romeo and Juliet, and Manet's Olympia is a reworking of Titian's Venus d'Urbino — both examples of what Posner calls 'creative imitation.' But focusing on Kaavya Viswanathan novel, How Opal Mehta Got Kissed, Got Wild, and Got a Life, Posner (Uncertain Shield), a judge on the U.S. Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals and expert on intellectual property, says this was a particularly modern, market-driven form of plagiarism: Viswanathan was attempting to compete against Megan McCafferty in the chick lit market by appropriating her competitor's own words. Posner focuses a lot on student plagiarism and seems to think all students should be considered suspect; schools that don't subscribe to detection software like Turnitin, he says, are 'nave.' Indeed, he believes publishers should, and will, begin to use such programs, concluding, optimistically, 'We may be entering the twilight of plagiarism.' It's unfortunate that Posner briefly brings politics into this important and timely discussion, superciliously accusing the so-called academic left of being 'soft on plagiarism.'" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"In this clear and elegant argument, Posner lays out the differences between copyright infringement and plagiarism, and parses what he calls higher and lower forms of the offense. This may sound like a judge delivering a reduced sentence, but Posner wisely reminds we have only recently begun to prize 'originality.'" Seattle Times

Review:

"Just the size for a cargo pants pocket, just long enough to mine one complex issue or problem, it's ideal for today's reading experiences — if not necessarily for today's attention span." Cleveland Plain Dealer

About the Author

Richard A. Posner is a judge on the United States Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals and a senior lecturer at the University of Chicago Law School. Judge Posner has written many works on jurisprudence and legal philosophy, as well as books and articles on issues of moment, including An Affair of State: The Investigation, Impeachment, and Trial of President Clinton; Breaking the Deadlock: The 2000 Election, the Constitution, and the Courts; Public Intellectuals: A Study of Decline; Preventing Surprise Attacks: Intelligence Reform in the Wake of 9/11; and Catastrophe: Risk and Response. He lives in Chicago.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780375424755
Author:
Posner, Richard
Publisher:
Pantheon Books
Author:
Posner, Richard A.
Subject:
Regional, Ethnic, Genre, Specific Subject
Subject:
General
Subject:
Mass media
Subject:
Intellectual Property
Subject:
Literary Criticism : General
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20070131
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
128
Dimensions:
6.5 x 4.7 x 0.7 in 0.4 lb

Other books you might like

  1. Steal This Music: How Intellectual...
    New Trade Paper $25.25
  2. Who Owns Culture?: Appropriation and... New Trade Paper $34.50
  3. The Broken Branch: How Congress Is... Used Hardcover $6.95
  4. Daulaires Book of Greek Myths Used Trade Paper $8.95
  5. History of American Law 3RD Edition Used Trade Paper $14.00
  6. Fearless Sex: A Babe's Guide to... Used Trade Paper $5.95

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Law » General
History and Social Science » Law » Intellectual Property » General
Humanities » Literary Criticism » General

The Little Book of Plagiarism Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$5.50 In Stock
Product details 128 pages Pantheon Books - English 9780375424755 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Not all plagiarized authors will agree with Posner's conclusion that plagiarism is an 'embarrassingly second-rate' offense, 'its practitioners... pathetic,' and that plagiarism should remain an ethical rather than a legal offense, punished by public shaming. But in a fascinating historical tour of the subject, he dismisses the idea that good art must be totally original. Shakespeare stole the plot of Romeo and Juliet, and Manet's Olympia is a reworking of Titian's Venus d'Urbino both examples of what Posner calls 'creative imitation.' But focusing on Kaavya Viswanathan novel, How Opal Mehta Got Kissed, Got Wild, and Got a Life, Posner (Uncertain Shield), a judge on the U.S. Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals and expert on intellectual property, says this was a particularly modern, market-driven form of plagiarism: Viswanathan was attempting to compete against Megan McCafferty in the chick lit market by appropriating her competitor's own words. Posner focuses a lot on student plagiarism and seems to think all students should be considered suspect; schools that don't subscribe to detection software like Turnitin, he says, are 'naïve.' Indeed, he believes publishers should, and will, begin to use such programs, concluding, optimistically, 'We may be entering the twilight of plagiarism.' It's unfortunate that Posner briefly brings politics into this important and timely discussion, superciliously accusing the so-called academic left of being 'soft on plagiarism.'" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Not all plagiarized authors will agree with Posner's conclusion that plagiarism is an 'embarrassingly second-rate' offense, 'its practitioners... pathetic,' and that plagiarism should remain an ethical rather than a legal offense, punished by public shaming. But in a fascinating historical tour of the subject, he dismisses the idea that good art must be totally original. Shakespeare stole the plot of Romeo and Juliet, and Manet's Olympia is a reworking of Titian's Venus d'Urbino — both examples of what Posner calls 'creative imitation.' But focusing on Kaavya Viswanathan novel, How Opal Mehta Got Kissed, Got Wild, and Got a Life, Posner (Uncertain Shield), a judge on the U.S. Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals and expert on intellectual property, says this was a particularly modern, market-driven form of plagiarism: Viswanathan was attempting to compete against Megan McCafferty in the chick lit market by appropriating her competitor's own words. Posner focuses a lot on student plagiarism and seems to think all students should be considered suspect; schools that don't subscribe to detection software like Turnitin, he says, are 'nave.' Indeed, he believes publishers should, and will, begin to use such programs, concluding, optimistically, 'We may be entering the twilight of plagiarism.' It's unfortunate that Posner briefly brings politics into this important and timely discussion, superciliously accusing the so-called academic left of being 'soft on plagiarism.'" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "In this clear and elegant argument, Posner lays out the differences between copyright infringement and plagiarism, and parses what he calls higher and lower forms of the offense. This may sound like a judge delivering a reduced sentence, but Posner wisely reminds we have only recently begun to prize 'originality.'"
"Review" by , "Just the size for a cargo pants pocket, just long enough to mine one complex issue or problem, it's ideal for today's reading experiences — if not necessarily for today's attention span."
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.