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On Empire: America, War, and Global Supremacy

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On Empire: America, War, and Global Supremacy Cover

ISBN13: 9780375425370
ISBN10: 0375425373
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In there four incisive and keenly perceptive essays, one of out most celebrated and respected historians of modern Europe looks at the world situation and some of the major political problems confronting us at the start of the third millennium.

With his usual measured and brilliant historical perspective, Eric Hobsbawm traces the rise of American hegemony in the twenty-first century. He examines the state of steadily increasing world disorder in the context of rapidly growing inequalities created by rampant free-market globalization. He makes clear that there is no longer a plural power system of states whose relations are governed by common laws--including those for the conduct of war. He scrutinizes America's policies, particularly its use of the threat of terrorism as an excuse for unilateral deployment of its global power. Finally, he discusses the ways in which the current American hegemony differs from the defunct British Empire in its inception, its ideology, and its effects on nations and individuals.

Hobsbawm is particularly astute in assessing the United States' assertion of world hegemony, its denunciation of formerly accepted international conventions, and its launching of wars of aggression when it sees fit. Aside from the naivete and failure that have surrounded most of these imperial campaigns, Hobsbawm points out that foreign values and institutions--including those associated with a democratic government--can rarely be imposed on countries such as Iraq by outside forces unless the conditions exist that make them acceptable and readily adaptable.

Timely and accessible, On Empire is a commanding work of history that should be read by anyone who wants some understanding of the turbulent times in which we live.

Review:

"In this collection of essays, the British historian denounces globalism's increasing economic inequalities, which in classic Marxist form, he claims burdenthose who benefit least. Not surprisingly, Hobsbawm expects developing political resistance to retard globalism's progress in the next 20 or so years. Eventually, he implies, globalism will merely be a blip in the historically determined process of the international proletariat's triumph. The major obstacle to that development is the United States. Hobsbawm's America essentially has become a rogue superpower that rejects international common law in favor of what he calls 'imperialism of human rights,' which, combined with a fear of terrorism, legitimates U.S. military intervention anywhere the 'uncontrollable and apparently irrational' U.S. government decides. Hobsbawm contrasts the 'instability, unpredictability, aggression' of the American pattern with an earlier, more measured, economically based British version that he considers almost benign by comparison (and is a far cry from his earlier writing on the subject). His loathing for American reliance on 'politico-military force' to pursue global ambitions as unlimited as they are undefined has reached new depths. This erudite polemic may appeal to the intellectual left, but is unlikely to change many minds outside that sphere." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Book News Annotation:

Prominent British historian Hobsbawm turns his eye towards the American grasp for world hegemony and related issues of war and peace in four essays written between 2000 and 2006. Over the course of the volume he discusses the end of empires, the nature of war and peace in the 20th century and the prospects for the 21st, responses to American military unilateralism, and the differences between British and American imperialisms. Annotation ©2008 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

From the best-known and most popular historian of modern Europe ("The Independent") comes a keenly perceptive and incisive look at empire and war as they have been transformed in the age of globalization.

Synopsis:

In there four incisive and keenly perceptive essays, one of out most celebrated and respected historians of modern Europe looks at the world situation and some of the major political problems confronting us at the start of the third millennium.

With his usual measured and brilliant historical perspective, Eric Hobsbawm traces the rise of American hegemony in the twenty-first century. He examines the state of steadily increasing world disorder in the context of rapidly growing inequalities created by rampant free-market globalization. He makes clear that there is no longer a plural power system of states whose relations are governed by common laws--including those for the conduct of war. He scrutinizes America's policies, particularly its use of the threat of terrorism as an excuse for unilateral deployment of its global power. Finally, he discusses the ways in which the current American hegemony differs from the defunct British Empire in its inception, its ideology, and its effects on nations and individuals.

Hobsbawm is particularly astute in assessing the United States' assertion of world hegemony, its denunciation of formerly accepted international conventions, and its launching of wars of aggression when it sees fit. Aside from the naivete and failure that have surrounded most of these imperial campaigns, Hobsbawm points out that foreign values and institutions--including those associated with a democratic government--can rarely be imposed on countries such as Iraq by outside forces unless the conditions exist that make them acceptable and readily adaptable.

Timely and accessible, On Empire is a commanding work of history that should be read by anyone who wants some understanding of the turbulent times in which we live.

About the Author

Eric Hobsbawm is a fellow of the British Academy and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has taught at the University of London, the College de France, MIT, Cornell. and the Graduate Faculty of The New School for Social Research. He is the author of more than twenty books. He lives in London.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

eelyo, May 1, 2008 (view all comments by eelyo)
Can't wait to earn enough to buy this $20 book.
Remember, if you can pronounce "proletariat", you might not be one. I'm one of those pointy headed college types who now cooks for a living, perhaps exactly who this is aimed at.
From his former writings, I'd say I'll like it too.
Happy May Day everybody - I've got to get back to work!
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9780375425370
Subtitle:
America, War, and Global Supremacy
Author:
Hobsbawm, Eric
Author:
Hobsbawm, Eric J.
Author:
Hobsbawm, E. J.
Publisher:
Pantheon
Subject:
Imperialism
Subject:
World politics
Subject:
Political Ideologies - Democracy
Subject:
International Relations - General
Subject:
Political Freedom & Security - International Secur
Subject:
Government - U.S. Government
Subject:
War on Terrorism, 2001-
Subject:
Democracy
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20080318
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
128
Dimensions:
7.52x4.78x.66 in. .48 lbs.

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Politics » International Studies
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Foreign Policy

On Empire: America, War, and Global Supremacy Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$9.95 In Stock
Product details 128 pages Pantheon Books - English 9780375425370 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In this collection of essays, the British historian denounces globalism's increasing economic inequalities, which in classic Marxist form, he claims burdenthose who benefit least. Not surprisingly, Hobsbawm expects developing political resistance to retard globalism's progress in the next 20 or so years. Eventually, he implies, globalism will merely be a blip in the historically determined process of the international proletariat's triumph. The major obstacle to that development is the United States. Hobsbawm's America essentially has become a rogue superpower that rejects international common law in favor of what he calls 'imperialism of human rights,' which, combined with a fear of terrorism, legitimates U.S. military intervention anywhere the 'uncontrollable and apparently irrational' U.S. government decides. Hobsbawm contrasts the 'instability, unpredictability, aggression' of the American pattern with an earlier, more measured, economically based British version that he considers almost benign by comparison (and is a far cry from his earlier writing on the subject). His loathing for American reliance on 'politico-military force' to pursue global ambitions as unlimited as they are undefined has reached new depths. This erudite polemic may appeal to the intellectual left, but is unlikely to change many minds outside that sphere." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , From the best-known and most popular historian of modern Europe ("The Independent") comes a keenly perceptive and incisive look at empire and war as they have been transformed in the age of globalization.
"Synopsis" by , In there four incisive and keenly perceptive essays, one of out most celebrated and respected historians of modern Europe looks at the world situation and some of the major political problems confronting us at the start of the third millennium.

With his usual measured and brilliant historical perspective, Eric Hobsbawm traces the rise of American hegemony in the twenty-first century. He examines the state of steadily increasing world disorder in the context of rapidly growing inequalities created by rampant free-market globalization. He makes clear that there is no longer a plural power system of states whose relations are governed by common laws--including those for the conduct of war. He scrutinizes America's policies, particularly its use of the threat of terrorism as an excuse for unilateral deployment of its global power. Finally, he discusses the ways in which the current American hegemony differs from the defunct British Empire in its inception, its ideology, and its effects on nations and individuals.

Hobsbawm is particularly astute in assessing the United States' assertion of world hegemony, its denunciation of formerly accepted international conventions, and its launching of wars of aggression when it sees fit. Aside from the naivete and failure that have surrounded most of these imperial campaigns, Hobsbawm points out that foreign values and institutions--including those associated with a democratic government--can rarely be imposed on countries such as Iraq by outside forces unless the conditions exist that make them acceptable and readily adaptable.

Timely and accessible, On Empire is a commanding work of history that should be read by anyone who wants some understanding of the turbulent times in which we live.

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