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Ladyfinger's & Nun's Tummies: From Spare Ribs to Humble Pie-A Lighthearted Look at How Foods Got Their Names

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Ladyfinger's & Nun's Tummies: From Spare Ribs to Humble Pie-A Lighthearted Look at How Foods Got Their Names Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"Everything in [this book] is delightful to learn. Barnette takes us through languages and across millennia in a charming style . . . that offers endless food for thought." --The New Yorker

What makes the pretzel a symbol of religious devotion, and what pasta is blasphemous in every bite? How did a drunken brawl lead to the name lobster Newburg? What naughty joke is contained in a loaf of pumpernickel? Why is  cherry a misnomer, and why aren't refried beans fried twice? You'll find the answers in this delectable exploration of the words we put into our mouths.

Here are foods named for the things they look like, from cabbage (from the Old North French caboche, "head") to vermicelli ("little worms"). You'll learn where people dine on nun's tummy and angel's breast. There are foods named after people (Graham crackers) and places (peaches), along with commonplace terms derived from words involving food and drink (dope, originally a Dutch word for "dipping sauce"). Witty, bawdy, and stuffed with stories, Ladyfingers and Nun's Tummies is a feast of history, culture, and language.

"Why didn't anyone think of this before? . . . What fun Martha Barnette has made of it all, every name for every dish explained and traced and jollied." --William F. Buckley, Jr.

Synopsis:

Everything in this book is delightful to learn. Barnette takes us through languages and across millennia in a charming style . . . that offers endless food for thought. --The New Yorker

What makes the pretzel a symbol of religious devotion, and what pasta is blasphemous in every bite? How did a drunken brawl lead to the name lobster Newburg? What naughty joke is contained in a loaf of pumpernickel? Why is cherry a misnomer, and why aren't refried beans fried twice? You'll find the answers in this delectable exploration of the words we put into our mouths.

Here are foods named for the things they look like, from cabbage (from the Old North French caboche, head) to vermicelli (little worms). You'll learn where people dine on nun's tummy and angel's breast. There are foods named after people (Graham crackers) and places (peaches), along with commonplace terms derived from words involving food and drink (dope, originally a Dutch word for dipping sauce). Witty, bawdy, and stuffed with stories, Ladyfingers and Nun's Tummies is a feast of history, culture, and language.

Why didn't anyone think of this before? . . . What fun Martha Barnette has made of it all, every name for every dish explained and traced and jollied. --William F. Buckley, Jr.

Synopsis:

Where do people dine on nun's tummy and angel's breast? How did a drunken brawl lead to the name lobster Newburg? What is a cherry a misnomer, and why aren't refried beans fried twice? Martha Barnette dishes up the answers in this delectable exploration of the words we put into our mouths.

Here are foods named for things they look like (vermicelli, "little worms") and people (Graham crackers and places (steak tartare). Here are foods whose names evoke ancient myths (cereal). Witty, bawdy, and stuffed with stories, Ladyfingers and Nun's Tummies is a gorgeous parfait of history, culture, and language.

About the Author

Martha Barnette, the author of A Garden of Words, did graduate work in classical languages at the University of Kentucky.  A former reporter for The Washington Post, she is now a contributing editor at Allure.  She lives in Louisville, Kentucky.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780375702983
Author:
Barnette, Martha
Publisher:
Vintage Books
Author:
Barnett, Martha
Location:
New York :
Subject:
Reference
Subject:
Dictionaries
Subject:
English language
Subject:
History
Subject:
Gastronomy
Subject:
Food
Subject:
Etymology
Subject:
Linguistics - Etymology
Subject:
Cooking and Food-Historical Food and Cooking
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Vintage
Series Volume:
105-584
Publication Date:
19981131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
224
Dimensions:
8 x 5 x 0.25 in 0.6875 lb

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Related Subjects

Cooking and Food » Reference and Etiquette » General
Cooking and Food » Reference and Etiquette » Historical Food and Cooking
Cooking and Food » Reference and Etiquette » Quotes and Trivia
History and Social Science » Linguistics » Specific Languages and Groups
Reference » Etymology
Reference » General
Reference » Words Phrases and Language

Ladyfinger's & Nun's Tummies: From Spare Ribs to Humble Pie-A Lighthearted Look at How Foods Got Their Names Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$3.95 In Stock
Product details 224 pages Vintage Books USA - English 9780375702983 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Everything in this book is delightful to learn. Barnette takes us through languages and across millennia in a charming style . . . that offers endless food for thought. --The New Yorker

What makes the pretzel a symbol of religious devotion, and what pasta is blasphemous in every bite? How did a drunken brawl lead to the name lobster Newburg? What naughty joke is contained in a loaf of pumpernickel? Why is cherry a misnomer, and why aren't refried beans fried twice? You'll find the answers in this delectable exploration of the words we put into our mouths.

Here are foods named for the things they look like, from cabbage (from the Old North French caboche, head) to vermicelli (little worms). You'll learn where people dine on nun's tummy and angel's breast. There are foods named after people (Graham crackers) and places (peaches), along with commonplace terms derived from words involving food and drink (dope, originally a Dutch word for dipping sauce). Witty, bawdy, and stuffed with stories, Ladyfingers and Nun's Tummies is a feast of history, culture, and language.

Why didn't anyone think of this before? . . . What fun Martha Barnette has made of it all, every name for every dish explained and traced and jollied. --William F. Buckley, Jr.

"Synopsis" by , Where do people dine on nun's tummy and angel's breast? How did a drunken brawl lead to the name lobster Newburg? What is a cherry a misnomer, and why aren't refried beans fried twice? Martha Barnette dishes up the answers in this delectable exploration of the words we put into our mouths.

Here are foods named for things they look like (vermicelli, "little worms") and people (Graham crackers and places (steak tartare). Here are foods whose names evoke ancient myths (cereal). Witty, bawdy, and stuffed with stories, Ladyfingers and Nun's Tummies is a gorgeous parfait of history, culture, and language.

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