Dreadfully Ever After Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | September 17, 2014

Merritt Tierce: IMG Has My Husband Read It?



My first novel, Love Me Back, was published on September 16. Writing the book took seven years, and along the way three chapters were published in... Continue »

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$4.50
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Burnside Literature- A to Z

Train

by

Train Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Los Angeles, 1953. Lionel Walk is a young black caddy at Brookline, the oldest, most exclusive country club in the city, where he is known by the nickname “Train.” A troubled, keenly intelligent kid with no particular interest in his own prodigious talent for the game, he keeps his head down and his mouth shut as he navigates his way between the careless hostility of his “totes” and the explosive brutality of the other caddies.

Miller Packard, a sergeant with the San Diego police department, first appears on the boy’s horizon as a distracted gambler, bored with ordinary risks. Train names him the “Mile-Away Man” as they walk off the first tee, and even months later, when they have become partners of a sort and are winning high-stakes matches against golf hustlers all over the country, the Mile-Away Man is a puzzle to Train, remote and intimate, impulsive and thoughtful, often all at the same time.

Packard is also a puzzle to Norah Still, the beautiful lone survivor of a terrifying yacht hijacking, who is both aroused and repulsed by his violent and detached manner at the crime scene. Packard himself feels no such ambiguity. He is unequivocally drawn to Norah – and perhaps to what has happened to her – and an odd, volatile triangle takes shape, Packard pulling the other two relentlessly into deeper water, away from what is safe.

With his trademark economy of style, Dexter brings these characters to life in their most reckless, vulnerable moments, stripping away words and manners until all that is left is the basic human pulse.

Review:

"In clear, pitch-perfect prose, Dexter moves the relentless story forward, exposing the ironies and dark undercurrents of charitable actions. The calamitous conclusion looms over the novel from the start, and it comes just as the reader knows it must." Publishers Weekly

Review:

"Train pulses with energy and meanness, and its nihilistic vision of a 'hungry' world where 'whatever kind of thing you is, there's something out there that likes to eat it' has a noir-inflected authority." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"Dexter?s skill resides in keeping an atmosphere of menace close to the surface at all times, so that the violent collision of the worlds surrounding Packard seems inevitable." The New Yorker

Review:

"There are pleasures aplenty: superbly rendered characters, every detail just right....And, perhaps best of all, there's the golf: fitting naturally into its noir context." Booklist

Review:

"What deepens and darkens [Dexter's] writing, so that art is the precise word to describe it, is a powerful understanding that character rules, that we live with our weaknesses and die of our strengths." John Skow, Time

Review:

"As always, Dexter gets violence on paper with a harsh precision, and the pages turn with a potboiler's fleetness. When the final boom rumbles, readers are likely to be up well past their bedtimes." Jonathan Miles, New York Times

Review:

"The strength of the novel lies far beyond its noirish setting or graphic plot twists. It is rather in Dexter's assured and direct handling of the ever-tangled subject of how ordinary people try to ford the nation's racial divide in pursuit of, or in flight from, deeper human truths." Chris Lehmann, The Washington Post

Review:

"Dexter is a master of colloquial poetry, of moods revealed through gestures and settings." Playboy

Review:

"One of the greatest American writers — a storyteller who cuts straight to the nerve." Scott L. Turow

Review:

"Dexter's writing is a living thing. It doesn't draw attention to itself; it just works." Bob Minzesheimer, USA Today

Review:

"Dexter is a writer who cuts to the bone." People

Synopsis:

National Book Award winner Pete Dexter crafts a stunning novel of crime, race, and unlikely liaisons — a tautly written Los Angeles noir set in the 1950s that brings to mind Chinatown and L.A. Confidential.

About the Author

Pete Dexter is the author of the National Book Award winner Paris Trout and of God's Pocket, Deadwood, Brotherly Love, and The Paperboy. He was born in Michigan and raised in Georgia, Illinois, and eastern South Dakota. He lives in Puget Sound, Washington.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780385505918
Author:
Dexter, Pete
Publisher:
Random House
Location:
New York
Subject:
General
Subject:
Police
Subject:
Mystery & Detective - Police Procedural
Subject:
Mystery fiction
Subject:
Historical fiction
Subject:
Authors, American
Subject:
Pennsylvania
Subject:
Philadelphia
Subject:
Caddies
Subject:
Beverly Hills
Subject:
African American men
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st ed.
Publication Date:
October 2003
Binding:
Hardcover
Language:
English
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
9.46x6.38x.98 in. 1.14 lbs.

Other books you might like

  1. L. A. Confidential Used Trade Paper $3.95
  2. Samaritan Used Hardcover $3.50
  3. The Fortress of Solitude
    Used Trade Paper $3.95
  4. The Havana Room: A Novel Used Hardcover $9.95
  5. Freedomland Used Hardcover $1.95
  6. Motherless Brooklyn
    Used Trade Paper $4.95

Related Subjects

» Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
» Fiction and Poetry » Mystery » A to Z

Train Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$4.50 In Stock
Product details 288 pages Doubleday Books - English 9780385505918 Reviews:
"Review" by , "In clear, pitch-perfect prose, Dexter moves the relentless story forward, exposing the ironies and dark undercurrents of charitable actions. The calamitous conclusion looms over the novel from the start, and it comes just as the reader knows it must."
"Review" by , "Train pulses with energy and meanness, and its nihilistic vision of a 'hungry' world where 'whatever kind of thing you is, there's something out there that likes to eat it' has a noir-inflected authority."
"Review" by , "Dexter?s skill resides in keeping an atmosphere of menace close to the surface at all times, so that the violent collision of the worlds surrounding Packard seems inevitable."
"Review" by , "There are pleasures aplenty: superbly rendered characters, every detail just right....And, perhaps best of all, there's the golf: fitting naturally into its noir context."
"Review" by , "What deepens and darkens [Dexter's] writing, so that art is the precise word to describe it, is a powerful understanding that character rules, that we live with our weaknesses and die of our strengths."
"Review" by , "As always, Dexter gets violence on paper with a harsh precision, and the pages turn with a potboiler's fleetness. When the final boom rumbles, readers are likely to be up well past their bedtimes."
"Review" by , "The strength of the novel lies far beyond its noirish setting or graphic plot twists. It is rather in Dexter's assured and direct handling of the ever-tangled subject of how ordinary people try to ford the nation's racial divide in pursuit of, or in flight from, deeper human truths."
"Review" by , "Dexter is a master of colloquial poetry, of moods revealed through gestures and settings."
"Review" by , "One of the greatest American writers — a storyteller who cuts straight to the nerve."
"Review" by , "Dexter's writing is a living thing. It doesn't draw attention to itself; it just works."
"Review" by , "Dexter is a writer who cuts to the bone."
"Synopsis" by , National Book Award winner Pete Dexter crafts a stunning novel of crime, race, and unlikely liaisons — a tautly written Los Angeles noir set in the 1950s that brings to mind Chinatown and L.A. Confidential.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.