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Medical Apartheid: the Dark History of Medical Experimentation on Black Americans From Colonial Times To the Present (07 Edition)

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Medical Apartheid: the Dark History of Medical Experimentation on Black Americans From Colonial Times To the Present (07 Edition) Cover

ISBN13: 9780385509930
ISBN10: 0385509936
Condition: Student Owned
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Publisher Comments:

From the era of slavery to the present day, the first full history of black America's shocking mistreatment as unwilling and unwitting experimental subjects at the hands of the medical establishment.

Medical Apartheid is the first and only comprehensive history of medical experimentation on African Americans. Starting with the earliest encounters between black Americans and Western medical researchers and the racist pseudoscience that resulted, it details the ways both slaves and freedmen were used in hospitals for experiments conducted without their knowledge — a tradition that continues today within some black populations. It reveals how blacks have historically been prey to grave-robbing as well as unauthorized autopsies and dissections. Moving into the twentieth century, it shows how the pseudoscience of eugenics and social Darwinism was used to justify experimental exploitation and shoddy medical treatment of blacks, and the view that they were biologically inferior, oversexed, and unfit for adult responsibilities. Shocking new details about the government's notorious Tuskegee experiment are revealed, as are similar, less-well-known medical atrocities conducted by the government, the armed forces, prisons, and private institutions.

The product of years of prodigious research into medical journals and experimental reports long undisturbed, Medical Apartheid reveals the hidden underbelly of scientific research and makes possible, for the first time, an understanding of the roots of the African American health deficit. At last, it provides the fullest possible context for comprehending the behavioral fallout that has caused black Americans to view researchers — and indeed the whole medical establishment — with such deep distrust. No one concerned with issues of public health and racial justice can afford not to read Medical Apartheid, a masterful book that will stir up both controversy and long-needed debate.

Review:

"This groundbreaking study documents that the infamous Tuskegee experiments, in which black syphilitic men were studied but not treated, was simply the most publicized in a long, and continuing, history of the American medical establishment using African-Americans as unwitting or unwilling human guinea pigs. Washington, a journalist and bioethicist who has worked at Harvard Medical School and Tuskegee University, has accumulated a wealth of documentation, beginning with Thomas Jefferson exposing hundreds of slaves to an untried smallpox vaccine before using it on whites, to the 1990s, when the New York State Psychiatric Institute and Columbia University ran drug experiments on African-American and black Dominican boys to determine a genetic predisposition for "disruptive behavior." Washington is a great storyteller, and in addition to giving us an abundance of information on "scientific racism," the book, even at its most distressing, is compulsively readable. It covers a wide range of topics — the history of hospitals not charging black patients so that, after death, their bodies could be used for anatomy classes; the exhaustive research done on black prisoners throughout the 20th century — and paints a powerful and disturbing portrait of medicine, race, sex and the abuse of power. (Dec. 26)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright © Reed Business Information)

Review:

"This groundbreaking study documents that the infamous Tuskegee experiments, in which black syphilitic men were studied but not treated, was simply the most publicized in a long, and continuing, history of the American medical establishment using African-Americans as unwitting or unwilling human guinea pigs. Washington, a journalist and bioethicist who has worked at Harvard Medical School and Tuskegee University, has accumulated a wealth of documentation, beginning with Thomas Jefferson exposing hundreds of slaves to an untried smallpox vaccine before using it on whites, to the 1990s, when the New York State Psychiatric Institute and Columbia University ran drug experiments on African-American and black Dominican boys to determine a genetic predisposition for 'disruptive behavior.' Washington is a great storyteller, and in addition to giving us an abundance of information on 'scientific racism,' the book, even at its most distressing, is compulsively readable. It covers a wide range of topics — the history of hospitals not charging black patients so that, after death, their bodies could be used for anatomy classes; the exhaustive research done on black prisoners throughout the 20th century — and paints a powerful and disturbing portrait of medicine, race, sex and the abuse of power." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"The Tuskegee Syphilis Study remains an ignominious milestone in the intertwined histories of race and medical science in U.S. society. Initiated in 1932, this tragic 40-year long public health project resulted in almost 400 impoverished and unwitting African-American men in Macon County, Ala., being left untreated for syphilis. Researchers wanted to observe how the disease progressed differently in... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Review:

"[A] stunning work, broad in scope and well documented, revealing a history that reverberates in African Americans' continued distrust of the medical profession." Booklist (Starred Review)

Review:

"Sweeping and powerful." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"Harriet Washington persuasively shows in her compelling Medical Apartheid that Tuskegee is only one chapter in a long history of physicians and scientists' mistreating African Americans..." Hartford Courant

Review:

"[A]n important book. Intellectually, I am pleased that I read it. Emotionally, I cannot drive the ugliness of its findings from my mind." Dallas Morning News

Review:

"This is an important book. The disgraceful history it details is a reminder that people in power have always been capable of exploiting those they regard as other,'..." New York Times

Review:

"[A] comprehensive account of the exploitation of black Americans in medical education and research...." Boston Globe

Review:

"[A] fascinating, chilling and important book." San Francisco Chronicle

Synopsis:

Medical Apartheid is the first and only comprehensive history of the medical experimentation on African Americans. Starting with the earliest encounters between Africans and Western medical researchers and the racist pseudoscience that resulted, it details the way both slaves and freedmen were used in hospitals for experiments conducted without a hint of informed consent — a tradition that continues today within some black populations. It shows how blacks have historically been prey to grave-robbing as well as unauthorized autopsies and dissections. Moving into the twentieth century, it shows how the pseudoscience of eugenics and social Darwinism was used to justify experimental exploitation and shoddy medical treatment of blacks and a view that they were biologically inferior, oversexed, and unfit for adult responsibilities. Shocking new details about the government's Tuskegee experiment are revealed, as are similar, less well-known medical atrocities conducted by the government, the armed forces, and private institutions. Medical Apartheid reveals the hidden underbelly of scientific research and makes possible, for the first time, an understanding of the roots of the African American health deficit.

About the Author

Harriet A. Washington has been a fellow in ethics at the Harvard Medical School, a fellow at the Harvard School of Public Health, and a senior research scholar at the National Center for Bioethics at Tuskegee University. As a journalist and editor, she has worked for USA Today and several other publications, been a Knight Fellow at Stanford University and has written for such academic forums as the Harvard Public Health Review and the New England Journal of Medicine. She is the recipient of several prestigious awards for her work. Washington lives in New York City.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

cardinarky, January 4, 2008 (view all comments by cardinarky)
The author makes two comments regarding historical quotes in her introduction: One from Churchill "The victors write the history", and one from an anonymous African chief "The Lion writes the history of the Giraffe" really describe the book (and the reason we have not seen anything like it before).
Rose Kennedy said "If I don't verbalize it, I don't have to deal with it".
All of these statements fit this book perfectly. I have been living with BLACK colored glasses for 60 years. This book has shattered those glasses and finally begun to permit me to see the light.

"I'm sorry" is a pathetically inadequate term in response to this work.
The book is spellbinding.
I wish to God this book had been published in the late 60's, things would definitely be different today.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(6 of 7 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780385509930
Subtitle:
The Dark History of Medical Experimentation on Black Americans from Colonial Times to the Present
Author:
Washington, Harriet A.
Publisher:
Doubleday
Subject:
History
Subject:
Ethics
Subject:
Medical care
Publication Date:
20070109
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
16-PAGE BandW PHOTO INSERT
Pages:
512
Dimensions:
9.54x6.42x1.42 in. 1.83 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » History of Medicine
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Professional Medical Reference
History and Social Science » African American Studies » General

Medical Apartheid: the Dark History of Medical Experimentation on Black Americans From Colonial Times To the Present (07 Edition) Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$14.00 In Stock
Product details 512 pages Doubleday Books - English 9780385509930 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "This groundbreaking study documents that the infamous Tuskegee experiments, in which black syphilitic men were studied but not treated, was simply the most publicized in a long, and continuing, history of the American medical establishment using African-Americans as unwitting or unwilling human guinea pigs. Washington, a journalist and bioethicist who has worked at Harvard Medical School and Tuskegee University, has accumulated a wealth of documentation, beginning with Thomas Jefferson exposing hundreds of slaves to an untried smallpox vaccine before using it on whites, to the 1990s, when the New York State Psychiatric Institute and Columbia University ran drug experiments on African-American and black Dominican boys to determine a genetic predisposition for "disruptive behavior." Washington is a great storyteller, and in addition to giving us an abundance of information on "scientific racism," the book, even at its most distressing, is compulsively readable. It covers a wide range of topics — the history of hospitals not charging black patients so that, after death, their bodies could be used for anatomy classes; the exhaustive research done on black prisoners throughout the 20th century — and paints a powerful and disturbing portrait of medicine, race, sex and the abuse of power. (Dec. 26)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright © Reed Business Information)
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "This groundbreaking study documents that the infamous Tuskegee experiments, in which black syphilitic men were studied but not treated, was simply the most publicized in a long, and continuing, history of the American medical establishment using African-Americans as unwitting or unwilling human guinea pigs. Washington, a journalist and bioethicist who has worked at Harvard Medical School and Tuskegee University, has accumulated a wealth of documentation, beginning with Thomas Jefferson exposing hundreds of slaves to an untried smallpox vaccine before using it on whites, to the 1990s, when the New York State Psychiatric Institute and Columbia University ran drug experiments on African-American and black Dominican boys to determine a genetic predisposition for 'disruptive behavior.' Washington is a great storyteller, and in addition to giving us an abundance of information on 'scientific racism,' the book, even at its most distressing, is compulsively readable. It covers a wide range of topics — the history of hospitals not charging black patients so that, after death, their bodies could be used for anatomy classes; the exhaustive research done on black prisoners throughout the 20th century — and paints a powerful and disturbing portrait of medicine, race, sex and the abuse of power." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "[A] stunning work, broad in scope and well documented, revealing a history that reverberates in African Americans' continued distrust of the medical profession."
"Review" by , "Sweeping and powerful."
"Review" by , "Harriet Washington persuasively shows in her compelling Medical Apartheid that Tuskegee is only one chapter in a long history of physicians and scientists' mistreating African Americans..."
"Review" by , "[A]n important book. Intellectually, I am pleased that I read it. Emotionally, I cannot drive the ugliness of its findings from my mind."
"Review" by , "This is an important book. The disgraceful history it details is a reminder that people in power have always been capable of exploiting those they regard as other,'..."
"Review" by , "[A] comprehensive account of the exploitation of black Americans in medical education and research...."
"Review" by , "[A] fascinating, chilling and important book."
"Synopsis" by , Medical Apartheid is the first and only comprehensive history of the medical experimentation on African Americans. Starting with the earliest encounters between Africans and Western medical researchers and the racist pseudoscience that resulted, it details the way both slaves and freedmen were used in hospitals for experiments conducted without a hint of informed consent — a tradition that continues today within some black populations. It shows how blacks have historically been prey to grave-robbing as well as unauthorized autopsies and dissections. Moving into the twentieth century, it shows how the pseudoscience of eugenics and social Darwinism was used to justify experimental exploitation and shoddy medical treatment of blacks and a view that they were biologically inferior, oversexed, and unfit for adult responsibilities. Shocking new details about the government's Tuskegee experiment are revealed, as are similar, less well-known medical atrocities conducted by the government, the armed forces, and private institutions. Medical Apartheid reveals the hidden underbelly of scientific research and makes possible, for the first time, an understanding of the roots of the African American health deficit.
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