Wintersalen Sale
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Tour our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Original Essays | November 7, 2014

    Karelia Stetz-Waters: IMG The Hot Sex Tip Cosmo Won't Tell You



    Cosmopolitan Magazine recently released an article titled "28 Mind-Blowing Lesbian Sex Positions." Where was this vital information when I was a... Continue »
    1. $10.47 Sale Trade Paper add to wish list

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$11.95
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Burnside Film and Television- Critics
1 Hawthorne Film and Television- History and Criticism

More copies of this ISBN

Lucking Out: My Life Getting Down and Semi-Dirty in Seventies New York

by

Lucking Out: My Life Getting Down and Semi-Dirty in Seventies New York Cover

ISBN13: 9780385527781
ISBN10: 0385527780
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

Only 2 left in stock at $11.95!

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"How lucky I was, arriving in New York just as everything was about to go to hell.”

That would be in the autumn of 1972, when a very young and green James Wolcott arrived from Maryland, full of literary dreams, equipped with a letter of introduction from Norman Mailer, and having no idea what was about to hit him. Landing at a time of accelerating municipal squalor and, paradoxically, gathering cultural energy in all spheres as “Downtown” became a category of art and life unto itself, he embarked upon his sentimental education, seventies New York style.

This portrait of a critic as a young man is also a rollicking, acutely observant portrait of a legendary time and place. Wolcott was taken up by fabled film critic Pauline Kael as one of her “Paulettes” and witnessed the immensely vital film culture of the period. He became an early observer-participant in the nascent punk scene at CBGB, mixing with Patti Smith, Lester Bangs, and Tom Verlaine. As a Village Voice writer he got an eyeful of the literary scene when such giants as Mailer, Gore Vidal, and George Plimpton strode the earth, and writing really mattered.

A beguiling mixture of Kafka Was the Rage and Please Kill Me, this memoir is a sharp-eyed rendering, at once intimate and shrewdly distanced, of a fabled milieu captured just before it slips into myth. Mixing grit and glitter in just the right propor­tions, suffused with affection for the talented and sometimes half-crazed denizens of the scene, it will make readers long for a time when you really could get mugged around here.

Review:

"Grunge, glitz, and gossip decorate this lively, catty memoir of Manhattan's Me Decade creative ferment. Vanity Fair critic Wolcott (Attack Poodles and Other Media Mutants) arrived as a college dropout in 1972 and scored a writing gig at the Village Voice — a snake-pit of feuds and nude editing — that inducted him into the city's hippest scenes. Chief among these was the punk-rock incubator at the bar CBGB, which affords him vibrant portraits of Patti Smith, the Talking Heads, and other punk luminaries against a backdrop of Hells Angels. Wolcott cameos celebrities from Bob Dylan and Gore Vidal — he doesn't so much drop names as spike them like a running back in the end zone — to the glamorous, squalid city itself, with its crime and crazies and open-air gay trysting. Wolcott's hip, closeup yet detached narrative falters during worshipful scenes of his mentor Pauline Kael, the New Yorker movie reviewer who elevated criticism to 'a higher power'; his reminiscences of dishing and cackling with Kael at screenings and soirées feel claustrophobic and dull. While his commentary on the cultural commentary sags, Wolcott's take on New York's culture itself, from schlubby porn impresarios to diaphanous ballerinas, is entertaining and evocative." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

About the Author

JAMES WOLCOTT is the longtime culture critic for Vanity Fair and a blogger for the magazine. He is the author of a novel, The Catsitters, and the non­fiction work Attack Poodles and Other Media Mutants. He lives in New York.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Caryn Rose, January 4, 2012 (view all comments by Caryn Rose)
Wolcott shares everything that was great about NYC (well, HIS nyc) in the 70s, without lording it over your head or making you feel like a dolt simply because his parents had sex before yours did. I picked it up expecting to drool over the CBGB's sections and instead found myself entranced with his tales of Pauline Kael and of falling in love with the ballet. I will buy this as a gift for any aspiring journalist I meet.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9780385527781
Subtitle:
My Life Getting Down and Semi-Dirty in the Seventies
Author:
Wolcott, James
Publisher:
Doubleday
Subject:
General Biography
Subject:
Biography - General
Publication Date:
20111025
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
8.61 x 5.78 x 1.03 in 0.9 lb

Other books you might like

  1. Linguistic Inquiry Monographs #38:... New Trade Paper $25.95
  2. Philippine Cookbook Sale Trade Paper $7.98
  3. Pathfinder Roleplaying Game: Core...
    New Hardcover $49.99
  4. That Is All Used Trade Paper $7.95

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Film and Television » Critics
Arts and Entertainment » Film and Television » History and Criticism
Biography » General
Featured Titles » Biography

Lucking Out: My Life Getting Down and Semi-Dirty in Seventies New York Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$11.95 In Stock
Product details 272 pages Doubleday Books - English 9780385527781 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Grunge, glitz, and gossip decorate this lively, catty memoir of Manhattan's Me Decade creative ferment. Vanity Fair critic Wolcott (Attack Poodles and Other Media Mutants) arrived as a college dropout in 1972 and scored a writing gig at the Village Voice — a snake-pit of feuds and nude editing — that inducted him into the city's hippest scenes. Chief among these was the punk-rock incubator at the bar CBGB, which affords him vibrant portraits of Patti Smith, the Talking Heads, and other punk luminaries against a backdrop of Hells Angels. Wolcott cameos celebrities from Bob Dylan and Gore Vidal — he doesn't so much drop names as spike them like a running back in the end zone — to the glamorous, squalid city itself, with its crime and crazies and open-air gay trysting. Wolcott's hip, closeup yet detached narrative falters during worshipful scenes of his mentor Pauline Kael, the New Yorker movie reviewer who elevated criticism to 'a higher power'; his reminiscences of dishing and cackling with Kael at screenings and soirées feel claustrophobic and dull. While his commentary on the cultural commentary sags, Wolcott's take on New York's culture itself, from schlubby porn impresarios to diaphanous ballerinas, is entertaining and evocative." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.