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1 Beaverton Literature- A to Z

Goodbye for Now

by

Goodbye for Now Cover

ISBN13: 9780385536189
ISBN10: 0385536186
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In the spirit of ONE DAY, comes a fresh and warmhearted love story for the 21st century. Sometimes the end is just the beginning . . .

Sam Elling works for an internet dating company, but he still can't get a date. So he creates an algorithm that will match you with your soul mate. Sam meets the love of his life, a coworker named Meredith, but he also gets fired when the company starts losing all their customers to Mr. and Ms. Right.

When Meredith's grandmother, Livvie, dies suddenly, Sam uses his ample free time to create a computer program that will allow Meredith to have one last conversation with her grandmother. Mining from all her correspondence—email, Facebook, Skype, texts—Sam constructs a computer simulation of Livvie who can respond to email or video chat just as if she were still alive. It's not supernatural, it's computer science.

Meredith loves it, and the couple begins to wonder if this is something that could help more people through their grief. And thus, the company RePose is born. The business takes off, but for every person who just wants to say good-bye, there is someone who can't let go.

In the meantime, Sam and Meredith's affection for one another deepens into the kind of love that once tasted, you can't live without. But what if one of them suddenly had to? This entertaining novel, delivers a charming and bittersweet romance as well as a lump in the throat exploration of the nature of love, loss, and life (both real and computer simulated). Maybe nothing was meant to last forever, but then again, sometimes love takes on a life of its own.

Review:

"Sam Elling is a brilliant software engineer for an online dating company, but his own love life is nonexistent — until he programs a matching algorithm that sets him up with his co-worker Meredith. Their giddy romance is interrupted by the sudden death of Meredith's beloved grandmother, and her grief inspires Sam to create RePose, software that scans e-mails, video chats, text messages, and other electronic communications to create an artificial intelligence that can communicate as if it were the deceased person. Meredith finds e-mailing with her dead granny so pleasurable that she and Sam decide to offer the service to others. But going public results in unforeseen consequences — from the types of conversations people want to have with their DLO (Dead Loved One) to rancor from religious groups concerned with the metaphysical impact of technological immortality. A surprising twist forces the characters to confront the question of whether RePose is a blessing or a burden in the complicated process of grieving. Though the conceit of chatting with the dead occasionally feels stretched for filler, Frankel (The Atlas of Love) addresses thorny questions with thought and care." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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About the Author

LAURIE FRANKEL is the author of one previous novel, The Atlas of Love. She teaches writing, literature, and gender studies at the University of Puget Sound. She lives in Seattle with her husband and young daughter.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

Amy Sawatzky, June 24, 2013 (view all comments by Amy Sawatzky)
I desperately want to figure out where I got the recommendation for this book so I can thank the person or institution that randomly put it on my 'to read' list. I rarely rate books 5 out of 5 stars but I sat down in an afternoon to start reading this book and I barely moved from the same spot well into the night until I finished it and started evangelizing about how "it is SO good!"
the premise sounds weird but really isn't: a computer genius Sam, tries to do whatever he can to help his girlfriend Meredith through the grieving process after her beloved grandmother dies. But really that's not what it's about. It's about what loving relationships look like (in all their unique forms) and how everyone deals differently with the loss of that relationship and no one is prepared to do so, nor are their friends and family prepared to help them through their own process. It's about how love exists past the lives of the people doing the loving and how beautiful and hopeful and semi-tragic that may feel. For a book about a solution to the grieving process, it was so full of love and life and funny moments as to leave the reader intrigued but unburdened at the end - but expect the hardiest of souls to be at least a little teary-eyed. And for the geeks out there, it's a little "Ghost in the Machine" for you as well.
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Just Jennifer, October 30, 2012 (view all comments by Just Jennifer)
I wasn’t sure what to expect with this one. I think there is a high chance that this story could have come off as being creepy ��" but luckily it wasn’t creepy at all. At least to me. I think it was a little freaky, being able to “talk” to dead loved ones is a bit weird. But the more I read the story the more I understood what these people were doing and it became a little less weird. I do think that if we ever see this kind of technology it will create a lot of controversy though. And the book does go into a bit of that controversy and touches on both sides of it. So it was very well-rounded.

I loved the characters ��" real and otherwise. Sam was a likable guy ��" like many “nerds” he was often overlooked as boyfriend material. Then he found Meredith. Because they were matched on how well their personalities would mesh rather than how they looked their romance was true. Meredith loved Sam for who he was, not how he looked. And it made for a great romance. Their relationship is the kind that everyone dreams of having. They were truly the perfect fit for each other. They complimented each other so nicely. Where Sam was an introvert Meredith was an extrovert and helped open Sam up. Where Meredith was emotional Sam helped her talk through things and look at the whole picture. If the story had just been about their love it would have been a great story. But there was so much more to this than just being a love story.

The book deals with a controversial issue, and regardless of which side you agree with I think it’s a book worth reading. It really does deal with both sides of the issue ��" those that don’t think it’s right, and those that do. The premise of the story is that you can talk to your loved ones after they’ve passed if they have a decent amount of online activity to build on. For people who are grieving being able to talk to that loved one just one more time can be the closure they need to move on with their lives. And yet there are those people who keep the lines of communication going for quite a while. Those people who come in looking for communication with their loved ones really become an integral part of the story. They’re sharing something so intimate with each other, and they really do become their own little family. As much as I liked the love story between Sam and Meredith seeing the changing dynamics between the people there to speak with their loved ones was a great addition to the story.

I’ve been seeing that the movie rights for this one have already been picked up. I think that’s awesome. It was a great book and I think it will make an amazing movie. It was wonderfully written, and as long as the screen play doesn’t take too many liberties with the story it will be a great movie.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780385536189
Author:
Frankel, Laurie
Publisher:
Doubleday Books
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
Romance - Contemporary
Publication Date:
20120831
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
9.55 x 6.4 x 1.32 in 1.2 lb

Related Subjects

Featured Titles » Literature
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Romance » Contemporary
History and Social Science » Pacific Northwest » Literature Folklore and Memoirs

Goodbye for Now Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$4.95 In Stock
Product details 304 pages Doubleday Books - English 9780385536189 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Sam Elling is a brilliant software engineer for an online dating company, but his own love life is nonexistent — until he programs a matching algorithm that sets him up with his co-worker Meredith. Their giddy romance is interrupted by the sudden death of Meredith's beloved grandmother, and her grief inspires Sam to create RePose, software that scans e-mails, video chats, text messages, and other electronic communications to create an artificial intelligence that can communicate as if it were the deceased person. Meredith finds e-mailing with her dead granny so pleasurable that she and Sam decide to offer the service to others. But going public results in unforeseen consequences — from the types of conversations people want to have with their DLO (Dead Loved One) to rancor from religious groups concerned with the metaphysical impact of technological immortality. A surprising twist forces the characters to confront the question of whether RePose is a blessing or a burden in the complicated process of grieving. Though the conceit of chatting with the dead occasionally feels stretched for filler, Frankel (The Atlas of Love) addresses thorny questions with thought and care." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
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