Master your Minecraft
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Tour our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    The Powell's Playlist | October 21, 2014

    Anne Rice: IMG The Powell’s Playlist: Anne Rice



    These are the songs that wake me up, take me out of my worries and anxieties, wash my brain cells, and send me to the keyboard to write with new... Continue »

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$21.00
List price: $24.95
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Burnside Science Fiction and Fantasy- A to Z

The Ghost in the Electric Blue Suit

by

The Ghost in the Electric Blue Suit Cover

ISBN13: 9780385538633
ISBN10: 0385538634
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $21.00!

 

Staff Pick

An homage to the institute of the fading British holiday centers, Graham Joyce tells an addictive tale here. David, a university student, spends his 1976 summer working at the rundown Skegness resort — a hot, sticky, and ladybug-infested summer — in order to escape home. Something has brought him here, although he's not sure what, and a sense of unease begins to settle on him. Increasingly, odd things start to occur; there's a man in an electric blue suit (but David can't make out his face), a small boy (but what is wrong with his eyes?), and a fortune-telling machine (but the fortune is unreadable); they seemingly appear everywhere. David can't sleep, but when he does, his dreams are haunted by terrifying versions of the man, the boy, and the machine. Unsettled, David also becomes entangled with other staff members at the resort, all of whom seem unsavory; or are they actually dangerous? This slow-boil tale is a creepy, startling read; Graham Joyce is a master of mood, and he is in full control here as he slowly dribbles out tiny bombs of exquisite tension.
Recommended by Dianah, Powells.com

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Critically acclaimed author Graham Joyce returns with a sexy, suspenseful, and slightly supernatural novel set 1976 England during the hottest summer in living memory, in a seaside resort where the past still haunts the present.

David, a college student, takes a summer job at a run-down family resort in a dying English resort town. This is against the wishes of his family... because it was at this resort where David's biological father disappeared fifteen years earlier. But something undeniable has called David there.

A deeper otherworldliness lies beneath the surface of what we see. The characters have a suspicious edge to them.... David is haunted by eerie visions of a mysterious man carrying a rope, walking hand-in-hand with a small child... and the resort is under siege by a plague of ladybugs. Something different is happening in this town.

When David gets embroiled in a fiercely torrid love triangle, the stakes turn more and more menacing. And through it all, David feels as though he is getting closer to the secrets of his own past.

This is a darkly magic and sexy book that has a strong suspense line running through it. It's destined to continue to pull in a wider circle of readers for the exceptionally talented Graham Joyce.

Review:

"At the start of the latest novel from Joyce (Some Kind of Fairy Tale), a coming-of-age story set in the summer of 1976, college student David Barwise arrives in Skegness, a gritty English seaside holiday resort, looking for a job. Although his decision is prompted partly by a desire to avoid working for his stepfather, David also wants to revisit the beach where, when he was three years old, he witnessed his father die of a heart attack. He has long suspected that his family has never told him the full story. After landing a job at the resort, David immerses himself in the hardscrabble world of carnies, fortune-tellers, and worn-out comedians. His kindness and humility enable him to make friends quickly, including with, to everyone's surprise, the volatile, anti-immigrant, English nationalist Colin. But when David proves unable to refuse the advances of Colin's wife, Terri, the resulting tension is palpable. Precisely because Joyce is a master of dialogue and character, the artificial plot complications provided by the mystery of David's unresolved past feel unnecessary, but, otherwise, his sweltering summer escapades make for a terrific and absorbing read. Agent: Doug Stewart and Madeleine Clark, Sterling Lord Literistic. (Aug.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Review:

"Beautiful, available women; ugly racist shenanigans; haunting apparitions. They all come with a college student's summer job in this marvelously juicy entertainment from the British fantasist [Graham Joyce]....Joyce folds [the] supernatural element gracefully into a realistic coming-of-age work that is also an evocation of a vanishing subculture....There's so much to enjoy here, from the fake stage magic of a woman sawn in half to the real magic of a gifted professional at work." Kirkus

Review:

"Joyce expertly captures a certain time and place, when family resorts were fading out and political extremism was on the rise, overlaying his snapshot with a subtle hint of the supernatural." Booklist

Review:

"Really scary...erotic and darkly supernatural." Library Journal

About the Author

Graham Joyce, a winner of the O. Henry Award, the British Fantasy Award, and the World Fantasy Award, lives in Leicester, England, with his family. His books include Some Kind of Fairy Tale, The Silent Land, Smoking Poppy, Indigo (a New York Times Notable Book of 2000), The Tooth Fairy, and Requiem, among others.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

NinaL, November 7, 2014 (view all comments by NinaL)
When I closed the cover after reading the last page, all I could say was "wow". Graham Joyce has a way with words. He draws the reader into the time and the narrator's head. The narrator, David, is like a good friend, yet unreliable because there is always a sense that he is holding something back from the reader. This was a novel that I wanted to rush through to understand the mystery of the man in the blue suit, yet I did not want it to end.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9780385538633
Author:
Joyce, Graham
Publisher:
Doubleday Books
Subject:
Suspense
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
Popular Fiction-Suspense
Publication Date:
20140831
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
8.5 x 5.7 x 1.09 in 0.94 lb

Other books you might like

  1. Are You My Mother?: A Comic Drama
    Used Hardcover $7.95

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Horror » General
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » Coming of Age
Fiction and Poetry » Popular Fiction » Contemporary Thrillers
Fiction and Poetry » Popular Fiction » Suspense
Fiction and Poetry » Science Fiction and Fantasy » A to Z
Metaphysics » Fiction

The Ghost in the Electric Blue Suit Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$21.00 In Stock
Product details 288 pages Doubleday Books - English 9780385538633 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

An homage to the institute of the fading British holiday centers, Graham Joyce tells an addictive tale here. David, a university student, spends his 1976 summer working at the rundown Skegness resort — a hot, sticky, and ladybug-infested summer — in order to escape home. Something has brought him here, although he's not sure what, and a sense of unease begins to settle on him. Increasingly, odd things start to occur; there's a man in an electric blue suit (but David can't make out his face), a small boy (but what is wrong with his eyes?), and a fortune-telling machine (but the fortune is unreadable); they seemingly appear everywhere. David can't sleep, but when he does, his dreams are haunted by terrifying versions of the man, the boy, and the machine. Unsettled, David also becomes entangled with other staff members at the resort, all of whom seem unsavory; or are they actually dangerous? This slow-boil tale is a creepy, startling read; Graham Joyce is a master of mood, and he is in full control here as he slowly dribbles out tiny bombs of exquisite tension.

"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "At the start of the latest novel from Joyce (Some Kind of Fairy Tale), a coming-of-age story set in the summer of 1976, college student David Barwise arrives in Skegness, a gritty English seaside holiday resort, looking for a job. Although his decision is prompted partly by a desire to avoid working for his stepfather, David also wants to revisit the beach where, when he was three years old, he witnessed his father die of a heart attack. He has long suspected that his family has never told him the full story. After landing a job at the resort, David immerses himself in the hardscrabble world of carnies, fortune-tellers, and worn-out comedians. His kindness and humility enable him to make friends quickly, including with, to everyone's surprise, the volatile, anti-immigrant, English nationalist Colin. But when David proves unable to refuse the advances of Colin's wife, Terri, the resulting tension is palpable. Precisely because Joyce is a master of dialogue and character, the artificial plot complications provided by the mystery of David's unresolved past feel unnecessary, but, otherwise, his sweltering summer escapades make for a terrific and absorbing read. Agent: Doug Stewart and Madeleine Clark, Sterling Lord Literistic. (Aug.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Review" by , "Beautiful, available women; ugly racist shenanigans; haunting apparitions. They all come with a college student's summer job in this marvelously juicy entertainment from the British fantasist [Graham Joyce]....Joyce folds [the] supernatural element gracefully into a realistic coming-of-age work that is also an evocation of a vanishing subculture....There's so much to enjoy here, from the fake stage magic of a woman sawn in half to the real magic of a gifted professional at work."
"Review" by , "Joyce expertly captures a certain time and place, when family resorts were fading out and political extremism was on the rise, overlaying his snapshot with a subtle hint of the supernatural."
"Review" by , "Really scary...erotic and darkly supernatural."
spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.