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What I Saw: Reports from Berlin, 1920-1933

What I Saw: Reports from Berlin, 1920-1933 Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The Joseph Roth revival has finally gone mainstream with the thunderous reception for What I Saw, a book that has become a classic with five hardcover printings. Glowingly reviewed, What I Sawintroduces a new generation to the genius of this tortured author with its "nonstop brilliance, irresistible charm and continuing relevance" (Jeffrey Eugenides, The New York TimesBook Review). As if anticipating Christopher Isherwood, the book re-creates the tragicomic world of 1920s Berlin as seen by its greatest journalistic eyewitness. In 1920, Joseph Roth, the most renowned German correspondent of his age, arrived in Berlin, the capital of the Weimar Republic. He produced a series of impressionistic and political essays that influenced an entire generation of writers, including Thomas Mann and the young Christopher Isherwood. Translated and collected here for the first time, these pieces record the violent social and political paroxysms that constantly threatened to undo the fragile democracy that was the Weimar Republic. Roth, like no other German writer of his time, ventured beyond Berlin's official veneer to the heart of the city, chronicling the lives of its forgotten inhabitants: the war cripples, the Jewish immigrants from the Pale, the criminals, the bathhouse denizens, and the nameless dead who filled the morgues. Warning early on of the dangers posed by the Nazis, Roth evoked a landscape of moral bankruptcy and debauched beauty; a memorable portrait of a city and a time of commingled hope and chaos. What I Saw, like no other existing work, records the violent social and political paroxysms that compromised and ultimately destroyed the precarious democracy that was the Weimar Republic.

Book News Annotation:

Gathers 34 impressionistic and political essays by journalist and novelist Joseph Roth (1894-1939) based on his observations of the war- shattered city of Berlin upon his arrival in 1920 and through the early 1930s. His poetic ruminations and critical commentary range across themes from Berlin's street life and bohemians and revolutionaries to the Reichstag, bicycle races, Hitler, and the 1933 book burning. Annotation (c)2003 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

"[Joseph Roth] is now recognized as one of the twentieth century's great writers." --Anthony Heilbut, 

Synopsis:

In 1920, Joseph Roth, the most renowned German correspondent of his age, arrived in Berlin, the capital of the Weimar Republic. He produced a series of impressionistic and political essays that influenced an entire generation of writers, including Thomas Mann and the young Christopher Isherwood. Translated and collected here for the first time, these pieces record the violent social and political paroxysms that constantly threatened to undo the fragile democracy that was the Weimar Republic. Roth, like no other German writer of his time, ventured beyond Berlin's official veneer to the heart of the city, chronicling the lives of its forgotten inhabitants: the war cripples, the Jewish immigrants from the Pale, the criminals, the bathhouse denizens, and the nameless dead who filled the morgues. Warning early on of the dangers posed by the Nazis, Roth evoked a landscape of moral bankruptcy and debauched beauty — a memorable portrait of a city and a time of commingled hope and chaos.

Synopsis:

"[Joseph Roth] is now recognized as one of the twentieth century's great writers."'"Anthony Heilbut, Los Angeles Times Book Review

Synopsis:

The Joseph Roth revival has finally gone mainstream with the thunderous reception for , a book that has become a classic with five hardcover printings. Glowingly reviewed, introduces a new generation to the genius of this tortured author with its "nonstop brilliance, irresistible charm and continuing relevance" (Jeffrey Eugenides, Book Review). As if anticipating Christopher Isherwood, the book re-creates the tragicomic world of 1920s Berlin as seen by its greatest journalistic eyewitness. In 1920, Joseph Roth, the most renowned German correspondent of his age, arrived in Berlin, the capital of the Weimar Republic. He produced a series of impressionistic and political essays that influenced an entire generation of writers, including Thomas Mann and the young Christopher Isherwood. Translated and collected here for the first time, these pieces record the violent social and political paroxysms that constantly threatened to undo the fragile democracy that was the Weimar Republic. Roth, like no other German writer of his time, ventured beyond Berlin's official veneer to the heart of the city, chronicling the lives of its forgotten inhabitants: the war cripples, the Jewish immigrants from the Pale, the criminals, the bathhouse denizens, and the nameless dead who filled the morgues. Warning early on of the dangers posed by the Nazis, Roth evoked a landscape of moral bankruptcy and debauched beauty; a memorable portrait of a city and a time of commingled hope and chaos. , like no other existing work, records the violent social and political paroxysms that compromised and ultimately destroyed the precarious democracy that was the Weimar Republic.

About the Author

Michael Hofmannwon the PEN/Book-of-the-Month Club Prize for his translation of [Joseph] Roth's The Tale of the 1,002nd Night.Joseph Roth(1894-1939) is the author of such classics as The Radetzky Marchand The Collected Stories of Joseph Roth.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780393051674
Subtitle:
Reports from Berlin 1920-1933
Author:
Roth, Joseph
Translator:
Hofmann, Michael
Author:
Hofmann, Michael J.
Author:
Hofmann, Michael
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company
Location:
New York
Subject:
Essays
Subject:
History
Subject:
Modern - 20th Century
Subject:
Europe - Germany
Subject:
Germany
Subject:
Crime
Subject:
Berlin
Subject:
Germany Politics and government 1918-1933.
Subject:
Berlin (Germany) Intellectual life.
Subject:
World History-Germany
Series Volume:
107-165
Publication Date:
20021217
Binding:
Hardcover
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
240
Dimensions:
8.5 x 6 x 1 in 0.945 lb

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Europe » Germany » Weimar Republic
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » Political Science
History and Social Science » World History » 1650 to Present
History and Social Science » World History » Germany » General

What I Saw: Reports from Berlin, 1920-1933
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$ In Stock
Product details 240 pages W. W. Norton & Company - English 9780393051674 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "[Joseph Roth] is now recognized as one of the twentieth century's great writers." --Anthony Heilbut, 
"Synopsis" by , In 1920, Joseph Roth, the most renowned German correspondent of his age, arrived in Berlin, the capital of the Weimar Republic. He produced a series of impressionistic and political essays that influenced an entire generation of writers, including Thomas Mann and the young Christopher Isherwood. Translated and collected here for the first time, these pieces record the violent social and political paroxysms that constantly threatened to undo the fragile democracy that was the Weimar Republic. Roth, like no other German writer of his time, ventured beyond Berlin's official veneer to the heart of the city, chronicling the lives of its forgotten inhabitants: the war cripples, the Jewish immigrants from the Pale, the criminals, the bathhouse denizens, and the nameless dead who filled the morgues. Warning early on of the dangers posed by the Nazis, Roth evoked a landscape of moral bankruptcy and debauched beauty — a memorable portrait of a city and a time of commingled hope and chaos.
"Synopsis" by , "[Joseph Roth] is now recognized as one of the twentieth century's great writers."'"Anthony Heilbut, Los Angeles Times Book Review
"Synopsis" by , The Joseph Roth revival has finally gone mainstream with the thunderous reception for , a book that has become a classic with five hardcover printings. Glowingly reviewed, introduces a new generation to the genius of this tortured author with its "nonstop brilliance, irresistible charm and continuing relevance" (Jeffrey Eugenides, Book Review). As if anticipating Christopher Isherwood, the book re-creates the tragicomic world of 1920s Berlin as seen by its greatest journalistic eyewitness. In 1920, Joseph Roth, the most renowned German correspondent of his age, arrived in Berlin, the capital of the Weimar Republic. He produced a series of impressionistic and political essays that influenced an entire generation of writers, including Thomas Mann and the young Christopher Isherwood. Translated and collected here for the first time, these pieces record the violent social and political paroxysms that constantly threatened to undo the fragile democracy that was the Weimar Republic. Roth, like no other German writer of his time, ventured beyond Berlin's official veneer to the heart of the city, chronicling the lives of its forgotten inhabitants: the war cripples, the Jewish immigrants from the Pale, the criminals, the bathhouse denizens, and the nameless dead who filled the morgues. Warning early on of the dangers posed by the Nazis, Roth evoked a landscape of moral bankruptcy and debauched beauty; a memorable portrait of a city and a time of commingled hope and chaos. , like no other existing work, records the violent social and political paroxysms that compromised and ultimately destroyed the precarious democracy that was the Weimar Republic.
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