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Barbarians to Angels: The Dark Ages Reconsidered

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Barbarians to Angels: The Dark Ages Reconsidered Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The barbarians who destroyed the glory that was Rome demolished civilization along with it, and for the next four centuries the peasants and artisans of Europe barely held on. Random violence, mass migration, disease, and starvation were the only way of life. This is the picture of the Dark Ages that most historians promote. But archaeology tells a different story. Peter S. Wells, one of the world's leading archaeologists, surveys the archaeological record to demonstrate that the Dark Ages were not dark at all. The kingdoms of Christendom that emerged starting in the ninth century sprang from a robust, previously little-known, European culture, albeit one that left behind few written texts. This recently recognized culture achieved heights in artistry, technology, craft production, commerce, and learning. Future assessments of the period between Rome and Charlemagne will need to incorporate this fresh new picture.

Synopsis:

Wells, one of the world's leading archaeologists, surveys the archaeological record to demonstrate that the Dark Ages were not dark at all. He presents a surprising look at this under-appreciated yet profoundly important period of European history. 24 illustrations.

Synopsis:

A rich and surprising look at the robust European culture that thrived after the collapse of Rome.

Synopsis:

A surprising look at the least-appreciated yet profoundly important period of European history: the so-called Dark Ages.

Synopsis:

The barbarians who destroyed the glory that was Rome demolished civilization along with it, and for the next four centuries the peasants and artisans of Europe barely held on. Random violence, mass migration, disease, and starvation were the only ways of life. This is the picture of the Dark Ages that most historians promote. But archaeology tells a different story. Peter Wells, one of the world"s leading archaeologists, surveys the archaeological record to demonstrate that the Dark Ages were not dark at all. The kingdoms of Christendom that emerged starting in the ninth century sprang from a robust, previously little-known European culture, albeit one that left behind few written texts.

Synopsis:

The barbarians who destroyed the glory that was Rome demolished civilization along with it, and for the next four centuries the peasants and artisans of Europe barely held on. Random violence, mass migration, disease, and starvation were the only way of life. This is the picture of the Dark Ages that most historians promote. But archaeology tells a different story. Peter S. Wells, one of the world's leading archaeologists, surveys the archaeological record to demonstrate that the Dark Ages were not dark at all. The kingdoms of Christendom that emerged starting in the ninth century sprang from a robust, previously little-known, European culture, albeit one that left behind few written texts. This recently recognized culture achieved heights in artistry, technology, craft production, commerce, and learning. Future assessments of the period between Rome and Charlemagne will need to incorporate this fresh new picture.

About the Author

Peter S. Wells is professor of archaeology at the University of Minnesota. He is the author of The Battle That Stopped Rome and The Barbarians Speak. He lives in St. Paul.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780393060751
Author:
Wells, Peter S.
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company
Subject:
Medieval
Subject:
Civilization, medieval
Subject:
History
Subject:
Europe - General
Subject:
Middle ages
Subject:
World History - Medieval and Renaissance
Copyright:
Publication Date:
July 2008
Binding:
Hardcover
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
24 illustrations
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
8.62x6.08x.90 in. .89 lbs.

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Western Civilization » Medieval
History and Social Science » World History » European History General
History and Social Science » World History » Medieval and Renaissance

Barbarians to Angels: The Dark Ages Reconsidered New Hardcover
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$23.95 In Stock
Product details 256 pages W. W. Norton & Company - English 9780393060751 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Wells, one of the world's leading archaeologists, surveys the archaeological record to demonstrate that the Dark Ages were not dark at all. He presents a surprising look at this under-appreciated yet profoundly important period of European history. 24 illustrations.
"Synopsis" by , A rich and surprising look at the robust European culture that thrived after the collapse of Rome.
"Synopsis" by , A surprising look at the least-appreciated yet profoundly important period of European history: the so-called Dark Ages.
"Synopsis" by , The barbarians who destroyed the glory that was Rome demolished civilization along with it, and for the next four centuries the peasants and artisans of Europe barely held on. Random violence, mass migration, disease, and starvation were the only ways of life. This is the picture of the Dark Ages that most historians promote. But archaeology tells a different story. Peter Wells, one of the world"s leading archaeologists, surveys the archaeological record to demonstrate that the Dark Ages were not dark at all. The kingdoms of Christendom that emerged starting in the ninth century sprang from a robust, previously little-known European culture, albeit one that left behind few written texts.

"Synopsis" by , The barbarians who destroyed the glory that was Rome demolished civilization along with it, and for the next four centuries the peasants and artisans of Europe barely held on. Random violence, mass migration, disease, and starvation were the only way of life. This is the picture of the Dark Ages that most historians promote. But archaeology tells a different story. Peter S. Wells, one of the world's leading archaeologists, surveys the archaeological record to demonstrate that the Dark Ages were not dark at all. The kingdoms of Christendom that emerged starting in the ninth century sprang from a robust, previously little-known, European culture, albeit one that left behind few written texts. This recently recognized culture achieved heights in artistry, technology, craft production, commerce, and learning. Future assessments of the period between Rome and Charlemagne will need to incorporate this fresh new picture.
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