Minecraft Adventures B2G1 Free
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Visit our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Interviews | August 12, 2015

    Jill Owens: IMG Eli Gottlieb: The Powells.com Interview



    Eli GottliebEli Gottlieb has done something unusual — he's written two novels, 20 years apart, from opposing but connected perspectives. The Boy Who Went... Continue »
    1. $17.47 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

      Best Boy

      Eli Gottlieb 9781631490477

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$19.50
List price: $27.95
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Beaverton Humor- Narrative

More copies of this ISBN

That's Not Funny, That's Sick: The National Lampoon and the Comedy Insurgents Who Captured the Mainstream

by

That's Not Funny, That's Sick: The National Lampoon and the Comedy Insurgents Who Captured the Mainstream Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Labor Day, 1969. Two recent college graduates move to New York to edit a new magazine called The National Lampoon. Over the next decade, Henry Beard and Doug Kenney, along with a loose amalgamation of fellow satirists including Michael O’Donoghue and P. J. O’Rourke, popularized a smart, caustic, ironic brand of humor that has become the dominant voice of American comedy.

Ranging from sophisticated political satire to broad raunchy jokes, the National Lampoon introduced iconoclasm to the mainstream, selling millions of copies to an audience both large and devoted. Its excursions into live shows, records, and radio helped shape the anarchic earthiness of John Belushi, the suave slapstick of Chevy Chase, and the deadpan wit of Bill Murray, and brought them together with other talents such as Harold Ramis, Christopher Guest, and Gilda Radner. A new generation of humorists emerged from the crucible of the Lampoon to help create Saturday Night Live and the influential film Animal House, among many other notable comedy landmarks.

Journalist Ellin Stein, an observer of the scene since the early 1970s, draws on a wealth of revealing, firsthand interviews with the architects and impresarios of this comedy explosion to offer crucial insight into a cultural transformation that still echoes today. Brimming with insider stories and set against the roiling political and cultural landscape of the 1970s, That’s Not Funny, That’s Sick goes behind the jokes to witness the fights, the parties, the collaborations—and the competition—among this fraternity of the self-consciously disenchanted. Decades later, their brand of subversive humor that provokes, offends, and often illuminates is as relevant and necessary as ever.

Review:

"The story of the National Lampoon begins with a group of disaffected Harvard boys in the late 1960s who decide to produce a satire magazine. Journalist Stein leaves no tangent unexplored and no petty grievance unaired as she traces the magazine's evolution and growing fame; forays into radio, stage, television, and movies; and its inevitable decay. The tumultuous 1970s provided innumerable subjects for mockery on both sides of the political spectrum, though the Lampoon didn't pretend to have a loftier social goal than to garner some crude laughs — and some paychecks. Despite Stein's detailed chronicles of the writing and business evolution of the magazine, the book itself isn't particularly funny. Jokes that worked 40 years ago have been removed both from the immediate context of the magazine and from the social context of the period. Stein's explanations of visual gags are even more problematic. She takes her subject seriously, when any of the people interviewed would be the first to point out how absurd it was. Though the book succeeds as journalism, and Stein shapes the magazine's uneven history into a coherent narrative, readers shouldn't expect many laughs. Agent: Chris Parris-Lamb, the Gernet Company. (June)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

The untold story behind a revolution in American comedy.

Synopsis:

Labor Day, 1969. Two recent Harvard graduates move to New York to edit a new magazine called The National Lampoon. Brilliant humorists Henry Beard and Doug Kenney presided over a team that within a decade transformed American culture and conquered the mainstream with a brand of subversive humor that provoked, offended, and often illuminated. With unparalleled access to the architects and impresarios of this boom, journalist Ellin Stein takes us behind the jokes to witness the fighting and partying, collaboration and competition of those who led a rebellion of the self-consciously disenchanted. At its zenith, the brand birthed the anarchic earthiness of John Belushi, the suave slapstick of Chevy Chase, and the deadpan wit of Bill Murray. Set against the roiling political and cultural landscape of the 1970s, That's Not Funny, That's Sick brims with insiders' stories while offering crucial insight into a transformation in comedy that still echoes today.

About the Author

Ellin Stein has contributed arts features and criticism to publications including the New York Times, The Times (of London), the Guardian, the London Telegraph, and Variety and is a former reporter for People and InStyle magazines. She currently lives in London, where she teaches screenwriting at Goldsmiths College, University of London.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780393074093
Author:
Stein, Ellin
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company
Subject:
Humor-Anthologies
Subject:
Essays
Subject:
Sociology-Media
Publication Date:
20130631
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
464
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.125 in

Other books you might like

  1. Pattern of Wounds (Roland March... Used Trade Paper $5.50
  2. War & Remembrance Used Mass Market $3.50
  3. Back on Murder (Roland March Mysteries) New Compact Disc $9.99
  4. Nothing to Hide (Roland March Mysteries) Sale Trade Paper $7.98

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Drama » Acting
Arts and Entertainment » Humor » Anthologies
Arts and Entertainment » Humor » Comedy Business and Criticism
Arts and Entertainment » Humor » Narrative
Business » Communication
Business » General
Featured Titles » Humor
History and Social Science » Literary History » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » Media
Reference » General
Reference » Publishing

That's Not Funny, That's Sick: The National Lampoon and the Comedy Insurgents Who Captured the Mainstream Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$19.50 In Stock
Product details 464 pages W. W. Norton & Company - English 9780393074093 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "The story of the National Lampoon begins with a group of disaffected Harvard boys in the late 1960s who decide to produce a satire magazine. Journalist Stein leaves no tangent unexplored and no petty grievance unaired as she traces the magazine's evolution and growing fame; forays into radio, stage, television, and movies; and its inevitable decay. The tumultuous 1970s provided innumerable subjects for mockery on both sides of the political spectrum, though the Lampoon didn't pretend to have a loftier social goal than to garner some crude laughs — and some paychecks. Despite Stein's detailed chronicles of the writing and business evolution of the magazine, the book itself isn't particularly funny. Jokes that worked 40 years ago have been removed both from the immediate context of the magazine and from the social context of the period. Stein's explanations of visual gags are even more problematic. She takes her subject seriously, when any of the people interviewed would be the first to point out how absurd it was. Though the book succeeds as journalism, and Stein shapes the magazine's uneven history into a coherent narrative, readers shouldn't expect many laughs. Agent: Chris Parris-Lamb, the Gernet Company. (June)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , The untold story behind a revolution in American comedy.
"Synopsis" by , Labor Day, 1969. Two recent Harvard graduates move to New York to edit a new magazine called The National Lampoon. Brilliant humorists Henry Beard and Doug Kenney presided over a team that within a decade transformed American culture and conquered the mainstream with a brand of subversive humor that provoked, offended, and often illuminated. With unparalleled access to the architects and impresarios of this boom, journalist Ellin Stein takes us behind the jokes to witness the fighting and partying, collaboration and competition of those who led a rebellion of the self-consciously disenchanted. At its zenith, the brand birthed the anarchic earthiness of John Belushi, the suave slapstick of Chevy Chase, and the deadpan wit of Bill Murray. Set against the roiling political and cultural landscape of the 1970s, That's Not Funny, That's Sick brims with insiders' stories while offering crucial insight into a transformation in comedy that still echoes today.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

       
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.