Poetry Madness
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Visit our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    The Powell's Playlist | March 13, 2015

    Kent Russell: IMG Kent Russell's Playlist for I Am Sorry to Think I Have Raised a Timid Son



    I don't listen to music while I write. Frankly, I don't see how anyone can. Since all style is rhythm, and since I cannot write anything that's as... Continue »

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$12.50
List price: $25.95
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
2 Local Warehouse US History- 1960 to 1980

This title in other editions

The Fourteenth Day: JFK and the Aftermath of the Cuban Missile Crisis: The Secret White House Tapes

by

The Fourteenth Day: JFK and the Aftermath of the Cuban Missile Crisis: The Secret White House Tapes Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

On October 28, 1962, Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev agreed to remove nuclear missiles from Cuba. Popular history has marked that day as the end of the Cuban Missile Crisis, a seminal moment in American history. As President Kennedy's secretly recorded White House tapes now reveal, the reality was not so simple. Nuclear missiles were still in Cuba, as were nuclear bombers, short-range missiles, and thousands of Soviet troops. From October 29, Kennedy had to walk a very fine line--push hard enough to get as much nuclear weaponry out of Cuba as possible, yet avoid forcing the volatile Khrushchev into a combative stance. On the domestic front, an election loomed and the press was bristling at White House "news management." Using new material from the tapes, historian David G. Coleman puts readers in the Oval Office during one of the most highly charged, and in the end most highly regarded, moments in American history.

Review:

"Coleman uses a neglected source as the basis for an unusual perspective on the 1962 Cuban missile crisis, the narrative beginning after Nikita Khrushchev agreed to remove nuclear missiles from Cuba. Director of the Miller Center's Presidential Recordings Program, Coleman uses secret White House tapes, authorized by President Kennedy, to show that the crisis didn't end there. A closely kept secret, the tapes offer 'unguarded, unrehearsed' testimony to the complex problems that remained as the missiles of October ostensibly stood down. Plugging leaks had high priority in the crisis's aftermath. in good part to shore up the administration's image of effectiveness. Kennedy's tacit acceptance of a nonnuclear Soviet military presence reflected his conviction that Khrushchev's miscalculations in Cuba could in turn lessen the tension over another cold war flashpoint, West Berlin — if America's administration spoke little, acted moderately, and showed a united front. That required a level of news management that by February 1963 led to political and media criticism sufficiently intense to inspire transparency. The decision to publicize intelligence information on the Cuban situation defused the immediate issue. It also, Coleman asserts, might have confirmed the missile crisis as 'a promising pivot point' had Kennedy's presidency not been truncated in Dallas. 20 photos." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

A fly-on-the-wall narrative of the Oval Office in the wake of the Cuban Missile Crisis, using JFK's secret White House tapes.

About the Author

The director of the Miller Center's Presidential Recordings Program, David G. Coleman is a history professor at the University of Virginia. He lives in Arlington.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780393084412
Author:
Coleman, David G
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company
Author:
Coleman, David G.
Subject:
United States - 20th Century
Subject:
US History - 20th Century
Publication Date:
20121031
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
20 photographs
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.125 in

Other books you might like

  1. High Noon in the Cold War: Kennedy,... Used Hardcover $5.95
  2. One Hell of a Gamble: Khrushchev,... Used Trade Paper $9.95
  3. The Universe in a Handkerchief:... Used Hardcover $10.50
  4. Pack of Lies (Paranormal Scene...
    New Trade Paper $14.95

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » US History » 1960 to 1980
History and Social Science » US History » 20th Century » General
History and Social Science » US History » Presidents » Kennedy, John F. » General
History and Social Science » World History » General

The Fourteenth Day: JFK and the Aftermath of the Cuban Missile Crisis: The Secret White House Tapes Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$12.50 In Stock
Product details 256 pages W. W. Norton & Company - English 9780393084412 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Coleman uses a neglected source as the basis for an unusual perspective on the 1962 Cuban missile crisis, the narrative beginning after Nikita Khrushchev agreed to remove nuclear missiles from Cuba. Director of the Miller Center's Presidential Recordings Program, Coleman uses secret White House tapes, authorized by President Kennedy, to show that the crisis didn't end there. A closely kept secret, the tapes offer 'unguarded, unrehearsed' testimony to the complex problems that remained as the missiles of October ostensibly stood down. Plugging leaks had high priority in the crisis's aftermath. in good part to shore up the administration's image of effectiveness. Kennedy's tacit acceptance of a nonnuclear Soviet military presence reflected his conviction that Khrushchev's miscalculations in Cuba could in turn lessen the tension over another cold war flashpoint, West Berlin — if America's administration spoke little, acted moderately, and showed a united front. That required a level of news management that by February 1963 led to political and media criticism sufficiently intense to inspire transparency. The decision to publicize intelligence information on the Cuban situation defused the immediate issue. It also, Coleman asserts, might have confirmed the missile crisis as 'a promising pivot point' had Kennedy's presidency not been truncated in Dallas. 20 photos." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , A fly-on-the-wall narrative of the Oval Office in the wake of the Cuban Missile Crisis, using JFK's secret White House tapes.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.