No Words Wasted Sale
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Visit our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Original Essays | January 6, 2015

    Matt Burgess: IMG 35 Seconds



    Late at night on September 22, 2014, at a housing project basketball court in Brooklyn, a white cop pushes a black man against a chain link fence.... Continue »

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$9.50
List price: $15.95
Used Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Hawthorne Philosophy- General

This title in other editions

The Courtier and the Heretic: Leibniz, Spinoza, and the Fate of God in the Modern World

by

The Courtier and the Heretic: Leibniz, Spinoza, and the Fate of God in the Modern World Cover

ISBN13: 9780393329179
ISBN10: 0393329178
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $9.50!

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Philosophy in the late seventeenth century was a dangerous business. No careerist could afford to know the reclusive, controversial philosopher Baruch de Spinoza. Yet the wildly ambitious genius Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, who denounced Spinoza in public, became privately obsessed with Spinoza's ideas, wrote him clandestine letters, and ultimately met him in secret.

"In refreshingly lucid terms" (Booklist) Matthew Stewart "rescues both men from a dusty academic shelf, bringing them to life as enlightened humans" (Library Journal) central to the religious, political, and personal battles that gave birth to the modern age. Both men put their faith in the guidance of reason, but one spent his life defending a God he may not have believed in, while the other believed in a God who did not need his defense. Ultimately, the two thinkers represent radically different approaches to the challenges of the modern era. They stand for a choice that we all must make.

Review:

"According to Nietzsche, 'Every great philosophy is... a personal confession of its creator and a kind of involuntary and unperceived memoir.'. Stewart affirms this maxim in his colorful reinterpretation of the lives and works of 17th-century philosophers Spinoza and Leibniz. In November 1676, the foppish courtier Leibniz, 'the ultimate insider... an orthodox Lutheran from conservative Germany,' journeyed to The Hague to visit the self-sufficient, freethinking Spinoza, 'a double exile... an apostate Jew from licentious Holland.' A prodigious polymath, Leibniz understood Spinoza's insight that 'science was in the process of rendering the God of revelation obsolete; that it had already undermined the special place of the human individual in nature.' Spinoza embraced this new world. Seeing the orthodox God as a 'prop for theocratic tyranny,' he articulated the basic theory for the modern secular state. Leibniz, on the other hand, spent the rest of his life championing God and theocracy like a defense lawyer defending a client he knows is guilty. He elaborated a metaphysics that was, at bottom, a reaction to Spinoza and collapses into Spinozism, as Stewart deftly shows. For Stewart, Leibniz's reaction to Spinoza and modernity set the tone for 'the dominant form of modern philosophy' — a category that includes Kant, Hegel, Bergson, Heidegger and 'the whole 'postmodern' project of deconstructing the phallogocentric tradition of western thought.' Readers of philosophy may find much to disagree with in these arguments, but Stewart's wit and profluent prose make this book a fascinating read." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Because Spinoza's doctrines have won acceptance from the architects of the modern world even as Leibniz's traditional religious beliefs have persisted among many who inhabit that world, the drama Stewart recounts will rivet readers skeptical and devout alike." Booklist

Review:

"Stewart goes far to rescue both men from a kind of dusty academic shelf, bringing them to life as enlightened humans displaying the kinds of intellectual and personality differences in which postmodern Westerners delight." Library Journal

Review:

"Stewart has achieved a near impossibility, creating a page-turner about jousting metaphysical ideas that casts the hallowed, hoary thinkers as warriors in a heated ideological battle." New York Times

Review:

"Witty, fascinating...Stewart deftly intertwines the lives and works of Spinoza and Leibniz and gives an elegant and sometimes hilarious overview of their differences....Stewart's wit and graceful prose make this book a delightful read." San Francisco Chronicle

Synopsis:

"A colorful reinterpretation. . . . Stewart's wit and profluent prose make this book a fascinating read."--, starred review

About the Author

Matthew Stewart is a freelance writer. He lives in New York City.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

maogli, February 26, 2007 (view all comments by maogli)
sorry, but this sounds a lot like Neil Stephenson's Baroque Trilogy to me, only in that Leibniz wars with Sir Isaac Newton over the Calculus, and God, and physics, and free will. I will agree that shedding further light on Leibniz is very necessary givin what he did, thought and wrote.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 3 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780393329179
Author:
Stewart, Matthew
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company
Subject:
Religious
Subject:
God
Subject:
History of doctrines
Subject:
History & Surveys - Modern
Subject:
History & Surveys - 17th/18th Century
Subject:
Modern
Subject:
Leibniz, Gottfried Wilhelm
Subject:
God -- History of doctrines.
Subject:
Philosophy : General
Subject:
Philosophy-Surveys
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20070131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
352
Dimensions:
8 x 6 in

Other books you might like

  1. On Truth Used Hardcover $9.00
  2. Very Short Introductions #43:... New Trade Paper $11.95
  3. Wittgenstein's Poker: The Story of a... Used Hardcover $9.50
  4. Nietzsche and Wagner: a Lesson in... Used Hardcover $11.95
  5. This Is Your Brain on Music: The...
    Used Trade Paper $7.95
  6. The sea, the sea
    Used Trade Paper $4.50

Related Subjects

Featured Titles » Culture
Humanities » Philosophy » General
Humanities » Philosophy » Surveys
Religion » Eastern Religions » Philosophy General

The Courtier and the Heretic: Leibniz, Spinoza, and the Fate of God in the Modern World Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$9.50 In Stock
Product details 352 pages W. W. Norton & Company - English 9780393329179 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "According to Nietzsche, 'Every great philosophy is... a personal confession of its creator and a kind of involuntary and unperceived memoir.'. Stewart affirms this maxim in his colorful reinterpretation of the lives and works of 17th-century philosophers Spinoza and Leibniz. In November 1676, the foppish courtier Leibniz, 'the ultimate insider... an orthodox Lutheran from conservative Germany,' journeyed to The Hague to visit the self-sufficient, freethinking Spinoza, 'a double exile... an apostate Jew from licentious Holland.' A prodigious polymath, Leibniz understood Spinoza's insight that 'science was in the process of rendering the God of revelation obsolete; that it had already undermined the special place of the human individual in nature.' Spinoza embraced this new world. Seeing the orthodox God as a 'prop for theocratic tyranny,' he articulated the basic theory for the modern secular state. Leibniz, on the other hand, spent the rest of his life championing God and theocracy like a defense lawyer defending a client he knows is guilty. He elaborated a metaphysics that was, at bottom, a reaction to Spinoza and collapses into Spinozism, as Stewart deftly shows. For Stewart, Leibniz's reaction to Spinoza and modernity set the tone for 'the dominant form of modern philosophy' — a category that includes Kant, Hegel, Bergson, Heidegger and 'the whole 'postmodern' project of deconstructing the phallogocentric tradition of western thought.' Readers of philosophy may find much to disagree with in these arguments, but Stewart's wit and profluent prose make this book a fascinating read." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Because Spinoza's doctrines have won acceptance from the architects of the modern world even as Leibniz's traditional religious beliefs have persisted among many who inhabit that world, the drama Stewart recounts will rivet readers skeptical and devout alike."
"Review" by , "Stewart goes far to rescue both men from a kind of dusty academic shelf, bringing them to life as enlightened humans displaying the kinds of intellectual and personality differences in which postmodern Westerners delight."
"Review" by , "Stewart has achieved a near impossibility, creating a page-turner about jousting metaphysical ideas that casts the hallowed, hoary thinkers as warriors in a heated ideological battle."
"Review" by , "Witty, fascinating...Stewart deftly intertwines the lives and works of Spinoza and Leibniz and gives an elegant and sometimes hilarious overview of their differences....Stewart's wit and graceful prose make this book a delightful read."
"Synopsis" by , "A colorful reinterpretation. . . . Stewart's wit and profluent prose make this book a fascinating read."--, starred review
spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.