Master your Minecraft
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Tour our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    What I'm Giving | November 28, 2014

    Eleanor Catton: IMG Eleanor Catton: What I'm Giving



    At Powell's, we feel the holidays are the perfect time to share our love of books with those close to us. For this special blog series, we reached... Continue »

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$11.95
List price: $16.95
Used Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
2 Burnside Astronomy- Space Exploration

Space Chronicles: Facing the Ultimate Frontier

by

Space Chronicles: Facing the Ultimate Frontier Cover

 

Staff Pick

The great Neil deGrasse Tyson, astrophysicist, director of the Hayden Planetarium, PBS/Nova host, and ambassador to all sorts of interstellar and cosmic awesomeness, is also the author of nearly a dozen books. His newest, Space Chronicles: Facing the Ultimate Frontier, is a collection of three dozen articles, speeches, and interviews (and even a poem!) previously published or delivered in public. Divided into three main parts ("Why," "How," and "Why Not"), Space Chronicles delves into a wide variety of topics and subtopics related to space exploration, the space program, and the science advanced by the two.

Tyson, with the trademark wit and humor that has made him so beloved, expounds upon the importance of reinvigorating our national space program and advocates for increasing NASA's budget (from its current and paltry halfpence on the tax dollar). He seeks these goals, not merely for the sake of exploration and discovery (important pursuits be they may), but instead to (re)foster a culture that shares a common dream of the future and inevitably results in new technologies, greater understanding, and an overall amelioration of the human species. Tyson decries the decline of scientific literacy so prevalent in American society today and contrasts it with other countries, whose own space programs are growing ever more focused and robust (there are now more scientifically literate citizens in China than there are college graduates in the United States).

When you visit other countries that don't nurture these kinds of ambitions, you can feel the absence of hope. Owing to all manner of politics, economics, and geography, people are reduced to worrying only about that day's shelter or the next day's meal. It's a shame, even a tragedy, how many people do not get to think about the future. Technology coupled with wise leadership not only solves these problems but enables dreams of tomorrow.

Space Chronicles is accessible and digestible to anyone curious about recent astronomical developments, as Tyson is adept at distilling the essence of even the most complex of subjects. This collection is rather light on the science (for those unnecessarily deterred by the often-challenging nature of headier works), and instead finds Tyson serving in his more familiar role of educator and diplomat of the stars. While there is some repetition to be found within these essays, articles, and speeches (as they were delivered to a range of audiences), it in no way detracts from the nature of Tyson's message and, in fact, only serves to reinforce the important points he attempts to convey.  Space Chronicles also features eight fascinating appendices, six of which focus on the meager tax dollars apportioned to NASA each fiscal year (as percentage of GDP, as percentage of total government spending, in comparison to other nations, etc.), and two that offer the full texts of NASA's policies as enacted by law (National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 and Selected Statutory Provisions Applicable to NASA).

Neil deGrasse Tyson (host of the soon-to-be-released sequel to Carl Sagan's epic miniseries, Cosmos) is a national galactic treasure. With infectious enthusiasm, reason, and humility, Tyson is the epitome of the sort of teacher that every student deserves to have at the front of his or her science classroom. Space Chronicles, at the very least, will likely renew or strengthen the allure and enchantment of space exploration for its readers and, perhaps, may just compel one to speak out as an advocate for bolstering the NASA budget, in the hopes of recommitting ourselves, as a nation, to the promise and wonder of the as-yet-uncharted frontiers overhead.

During our brief stay on planet Earth, we owe ourselves and our descendants the opportunity to explore — in part because it's fun to do. But there's a far nobler reason. The day our knowledge of the cosmos ceases to expand, we risk regressing to the childish view that the universe figuratively and literally revolves around us. In that bleak world, arms-bearing, resource-hungry people and nations would be prone to act on their "low contracted prejudices." And that would be the last gasp of human enlightenment — until the rise of a visionary new culture that could once again embrace the cosmic perspective.

Recommended by Jeremy, Powells.com

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

America's space program is at a turning point. After decades of global primacy, NASA has ended the space-shuttle program, cutting off its access to space. No astronauts will be launched in an American craft, from American soil, until the 2020s, and NASA may soon find itself eclipsed by other countries' space programs.

With his signature wit and thought-provoking insights, Neil deGrasse Tyson — one of our foremost thinkers on all things space — illuminates the past, present, and future of space exploration and brilliantly reminds us why NASA matters now as much as ever. As Tyson reveals, exploring the space frontier can profoundly enrich many aspects of our daily lives, from education systems and the economy to national security and morale. For America to maintain its status as a global leader and a technological innovator, he explains, we must regain our enthusiasm and curiosity about what lies beyond our world.

Provocative, humorous, and wonderfully readable, Space Chronicles represents the best of Tyson's recent commentary, including a must-read prologue on NASA and partisan politics. Reflecting on topics that range from scientific literacy to space-travel missteps, Tyson gives us an urgent, clear-eyed, and ultimately inspiring vision for the future.

Review:

"A compelling appeal, at just the right time, for continuing to look up." Air & Space

Review:

"A genial advocate for the space program, Tyson offers diagnoses of its malaise that will resonate with its supporters." Booklist

Review:

"An enthusiastic, persuasive case to start probing outer space again." Kirkus Reviews

Synopsis:

Neil deGrasse Tyson is a rare breed of astrophysicist, one who can speak as easily and brilliantly with popular audiences as with professional scientists. Now that NASA has put human space flight effectively on hold with a five- or possibly ten-year delay until the next launch of astronauts from U.S. soil, Tyson's views on the future of space travel and America's role in that future are especially timely and urgent. This book represents the best of Tyson's commentary, including a candid new introductory essay on NASA and partisan politics, giving us an eye-opening manifesto on the importance of space exploration for America s economy, security, and morale. Thanks to Tyson's fresh voice and trademark humor, his insights are as delightful as they are provocative, on topics that range from the missteps that shaped our recent history of space travel to how aliens, if they existed, might go about finding us.

About the Author

Neil deGrasse Tyson is an astrophysicist with the American Museum of Natural History, director of the world-famous Hayden Planetarium, a monthly columnist for Natural History, and an award-winning author. He has begun production of a new Cosmos series, premiering in early 2013. He lives in New York City.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780393343625
Author:
deGrasse Tyson, Neil
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company
Author:
Tyson, Neil de Grasse
Author:
Degrasse Tyson, Neil
Author:
Lang, Avis
Subject:
Cosmology
Subject:
Science Reference-Technology
Publication Date:
20130331
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
384
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in

Other books you might like

  1. The Four Agreements: A Practical...
    Used Trade Paper $8.00
  2. Powell's Tattoo Buttons New Miscellaneous $6.00

Related Subjects

» Arts and Entertainment » Sale Books
» Featured Titles » Science
» Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
» History and Social Science » World History » General
» Reference » Science Reference » General
» Reference » Science Reference » Technology
» Science and Mathematics » Astronomy » General
» Science and Mathematics » Astronomy » Space Exploration
» Science and Mathematics » Featured Titles in Tech » General
» Science and Mathematics » Featured Titles in Tech » Mathematics & Physics
» Science and Mathematics » Featured Titles in Tech » New Arrivals
» Science and Mathematics » Nature Studies » General

Space Chronicles: Facing the Ultimate Frontier Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$11.95 In Stock
Product details 384 pages W. W. Norton & Company - English 9780393343625 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

The great Neil deGrasse Tyson, astrophysicist, director of the Hayden Planetarium, PBS/Nova host, and ambassador to all sorts of interstellar and cosmic awesomeness, is also the author of nearly a dozen books. His newest, Space Chronicles: Facing the Ultimate Frontier, is a collection of three dozen articles, speeches, and interviews (and even a poem!) previously published or delivered in public. Divided into three main parts ("Why," "How," and "Why Not"), Space Chronicles delves into a wide variety of topics and subtopics related to space exploration, the space program, and the science advanced by the two.

Tyson, with the trademark wit and humor that has made him so beloved, expounds upon the importance of reinvigorating our national space program and advocates for increasing NASA's budget (from its current and paltry halfpence on the tax dollar). He seeks these goals, not merely for the sake of exploration and discovery (important pursuits be they may), but instead to (re)foster a culture that shares a common dream of the future and inevitably results in new technologies, greater understanding, and an overall amelioration of the human species. Tyson decries the decline of scientific literacy so prevalent in American society today and contrasts it with other countries, whose own space programs are growing ever more focused and robust (there are now more scientifically literate citizens in China than there are college graduates in the United States).

When you visit other countries that don't nurture these kinds of ambitions, you can feel the absence of hope. Owing to all manner of politics, economics, and geography, people are reduced to worrying only about that day's shelter or the next day's meal. It's a shame, even a tragedy, how many people do not get to think about the future. Technology coupled with wise leadership not only solves these problems but enables dreams of tomorrow.

Space Chronicles is accessible and digestible to anyone curious about recent astronomical developments, as Tyson is adept at distilling the essence of even the most complex of subjects. This collection is rather light on the science (for those unnecessarily deterred by the often-challenging nature of headier works), and instead finds Tyson serving in his more familiar role of educator and diplomat of the stars. While there is some repetition to be found within these essays, articles, and speeches (as they were delivered to a range of audiences), it in no way detracts from the nature of Tyson's message and, in fact, only serves to reinforce the important points he attempts to convey.  Space Chronicles also features eight fascinating appendices, six of which focus on the meager tax dollars apportioned to NASA each fiscal year (as percentage of GDP, as percentage of total government spending, in comparison to other nations, etc.), and two that offer the full texts of NASA's policies as enacted by law (National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 and Selected Statutory Provisions Applicable to NASA).

Neil deGrasse Tyson (host of the soon-to-be-released sequel to Carl Sagan's epic miniseries, Cosmos) is a national galactic treasure. With infectious enthusiasm, reason, and humility, Tyson is the epitome of the sort of teacher that every student deserves to have at the front of his or her science classroom. Space Chronicles, at the very least, will likely renew or strengthen the allure and enchantment of space exploration for its readers and, perhaps, may just compel one to speak out as an advocate for bolstering the NASA budget, in the hopes of recommitting ourselves, as a nation, to the promise and wonder of the as-yet-uncharted frontiers overhead.

During our brief stay on planet Earth, we owe ourselves and our descendants the opportunity to explore — in part because it's fun to do. But there's a far nobler reason. The day our knowledge of the cosmos ceases to expand, we risk regressing to the childish view that the universe figuratively and literally revolves around us. In that bleak world, arms-bearing, resource-hungry people and nations would be prone to act on their "low contracted prejudices." And that would be the last gasp of human enlightenment — until the rise of a visionary new culture that could once again embrace the cosmic perspective.

"Review" by , "A compelling appeal, at just the right time, for continuing to look up." Air & Space
"Review" by , "A genial advocate for the space program, Tyson offers diagnoses of its malaise that will resonate with its supporters."
"Review" by , "An enthusiastic, persuasive case to start probing outer space again."
"Synopsis" by , Neil deGrasse Tyson is a rare breed of astrophysicist, one who can speak as easily and brilliantly with popular audiences as with professional scientists. Now that NASA has put human space flight effectively on hold with a five- or possibly ten-year delay until the next launch of astronauts from U.S. soil, Tyson's views on the future of space travel and America's role in that future are especially timely and urgent. This book represents the best of Tyson's commentary, including a candid new introductory essay on NASA and partisan politics, giving us an eye-opening manifesto on the importance of space exploration for America s economy, security, and morale. Thanks to Tyson's fresh voice and trademark humor, his insights are as delightful as they are provocative, on topics that range from the missteps that shaped our recent history of space travel to how aliens, if they existed, might go about finding us.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.