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Life After Death

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Life After Death Cover

ISBN13: 9780399160202
ISBN10: 0399160205
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

From one of the greatest legal injustices of our time sprang one of the most unlikely—and unforgettable—love stories. Damien Echols was just eighteen years old when he was condemned to death for a crime he didnt commit. His case—that of the infamous “West Memphis Three”—gained notoriety after a documentary, Paradise Lost, exposed the biased nature of the trial and Echols as the precocious, charming—and tragic—figure at its center. Lorri Davis was a landscape architect living in New York City when she surreptitiously wandered into a showing of the film, and she left forever changed. She, too, was from the South, accustomed to being the outsider in a small town. She saw much of herself in Echols, understood how he could easily have been swept up in a witch hunt, and she couldnt get him out of her head. So she wrote him a letter—and when it arrived in Echolss penitentiary cell in April 1996, hers were some of the first kind words of support he heard.

Over the course of a remarkable sixteen-year correspondence, Echols and Davis grew to know each other, fall in love, and marry—all without ever being able to touch each other freely or be alone together. In Yours for Eternity, their extraordinary letters provide a singular portrait of their marriage, from the first, heady days of discovery to the final, painful months before Echolss release. Through postscripts and footnotes, Echols and Davis describe how they overcame the enormous challenges and heartbreaks throughout the years—personal setbacks, legal complications, and much more. Yours for Eternity reveals a relationship unfolding in the most exceptional of circumstances. Powerful and incredibly intimate, it is a modern-day love story for the ages.

Review:

"Wrongly convicted at 18 along with two other teenagers and sentenced to death for the 1993 murder of three eight-year-old boys in West Memphis, Ark., Echols spent nearly two decades in prison before being released in August 2011. In this searing, finely wrought memoir, Echols recalls his poverty-stricken childhood, the trial of the West Memphis 3, and the harsh realities of life on death row. Sent there in 1994, Echols journaled consistently, though many notebooks were destroyed by guards. Echols describes death row as the equivalent of solitary confinement, his only human contact the infrequently allowed visitors from the outside world. Even sunlight and fresh air were denied at Varner Super Max, the facility he was transferred to in 2003. Echols recalls his less than ideal home life, with a mother who cultivated drama and a stepfather he despised (the feeling seems to have been mutual). The most affecting sections are Echols's philosophical musings on all he has lost, his thoughts often influenced by Zen Buddhism. In one journal entry that survived the guards' purge, Echols contemplates what he misses the most while in prison. The answer is a heart-wrenching and simple commentary on American prison life: 'In the end it's not the fruit I miss most... I miss being treated like a human being.' (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

New York Times bestselling author Damien Echols and his wife Lorri Davis reveal their intimate and affecting letters, written while Echols was wrongfully imprisoned on death row.

An explosive bestseller, Life After Death turned a national spotlight on Damien Echols, who was just eighteen when he was wrongly condemned to death. But one of the most remarkable parts of his story still remained untold. After seeing a documentary about the and#147;West Memphis Three,and#8221; Lorri Davisand#151;a New Yorkbased landscape architectand#151;wrote him a letter, beginning a thirteen-year correspondence that witnessed their marriage while Echols was still on death row and culminated in Echolsand#8217; release in 2011. Sharing their private letters, Yours for Eternity is a must-read for the legions who followed the case as well as anyone who appreciates an extraordinary love story.

Synopsis:

The New York Times bestselling memoir by Damien Echols of the West Memphis Three, who was falsely convicted of three murders and spent nearly eighteen years on Death Rowand#151;Life After Death is destined to be a classic of explosive, riveting prison literature.

About the Author

Born in 1974, Damien Echols grew up in Mississippi, Tennessee, Maryland, Oregon, Texas, Louisiana, and Arkansas. At the age of eighteen, he was wrongfully convicted of murder, along with Jason Baldwin and Jessie Misskelley, Jr., thereafter known as the West Memphis Three. Echols received a death sentence and spent almost eighteen years on death row until he, Baldwin, and Misskelley were released in 2011. The WM3 have been the subject of Paradise Lost, a three-part documentary series produced by HBO, and West of Memphis, a documentary produced by Peter Jackson and Fran Walsh. Echols is the author of the New York Times best-selling memoir Life After Death,

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 3 comments:

teacher.darren, January 30, 2013 (view all comments by teacher.darren)
Really, really enjoyed this. I guess it would help readers to have either read up on the WM3 case or seen the Paradise Lost/West of Memphis documentaries.

To say that Echols had some crappy cards dealt to him would be an understatement. The book made me sad at times, then outraged and finally uplifted that Echols never threw in the towel whilst in jail. Instead he turns to writing and reading, meditation to get himself through day after day, year after year in prison whilst dealing with a ridiculous appeals process that drags on endlessly.

Hard to put down once you start. I can only imagine the emotions he went through when released.



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say, January 7, 2013 (view all comments by say)
I found this autobiographical book to be deeply moving, an honest account written in a most absorbing style.
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moiraethefates, October 9, 2012 (view all comments by moiraethefates)
* Hardcover: 416 pages
* Publisher: Blue Rider Press; First Edition edition (September 18, 2012)
* ISBN-10: 0399160205
* Author: Damien Echols
* Cover art: I like the color contrast and how the tattoos sand out.
* Over all rating: *****
* Obtained: My personal book shelf.

Life after death by Damien Echols
Reviewed by Moirae the fates book reviews

In 1993, teenagers Damien Echols, Jason Baldwin, and Jessie Misskelley, Jr.�"who have come to be known as the West Memphis Three�"were arrested for the murders of three eight-year-old boys in Arkansas. The ensuing trial was marked by tampered evidence, false testimony, and public hysteria. Baldwin and Misskelley were sentenced to life in prison; while eighteen-year-old Echols, deemed the “ringleader,” was sentenced to death. Over the next two decades, the WM3 became known worldwide as a symbol of wrongful conviction and imprisonment, with thousands of supporters and many notable celebrities who called for a new trial. In a shocking turn of events, all three men were released in August 2011.
Now Echols shares his story in full�"from abuse by prison guards and wardens, to portraits of fellow inmates and deplorable living conditions, to the incredible reserves of patience, spirituality, and perseverance that kept him alive and sane while incarcerated for nearly two decades.

In these pages, Echols reveals himself a brilliant writer, infusing his narrative with tragedy and irony in equal measure: he describes the terrors he experienced every day and his outrage toward the American justice system, and offers a firsthand account of living on Death Row in heartbreaking, agonizing detail. Life After Death is destined to be a riveting, explosive classic of prison literature.(Synopsis taken from goodreads)

Where to start? First off memoirs are very difficult to review as you are reviewing a persons life in a way and it can feel as if you are passing judgment on someone else life and experiences.
Over all, I did enjoy reading this, and that in of it's self sounds morbid. It should be stated that I have always been a supporter of Damien, Jason and Jessie ever since I first found out about the case. If you have read Echols' first book Almost Home then you will be very familiar with some of the stories in this first part of this book. Which isn't a big deal and is to be expected since the only outside life he had was up until the age of eighteen.

There was a lot in this book that was hard to read, some of the stories he shares from his time on Death Row are too horrible to imagine. I read a lot of fiction and have never come across anything so sickening and I read a lot of horror. It just goes to show how real life can be worse then fiction.

I do wish that there was more of an explanation on the Alford plea, but Echols explains how much of a shock it was, so it's understandable why there wasn't a lot of explanation on it.
The one thing that did bother me a little was how there were a few times when he would repeat a story or a small part of it in different chapters, but at the same time, it flowed so I guess that was why it was in there twice or he needed to drive a point home.

I did learn a lot more in this one then in his first book though, the documentaries and other books on the case do leave a lot of information about how the WMPD treated Echols long before the case and how he was always harassed by them.

The best parts of the book are the parts where he talks about his wife Lorri. Just reading it you can tell just how much he loves her and how deep that love is. It truly is the only beautiful thing in a very sad and depressing book. If you are thinking about reading this book or if you are a supporter of Damien, Jason and Jessie or even if you're just curious about Death Row in Arkansas then I would highly recommend this book.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780399160202
Subtitle:
A Love Story on Death Row
Author:
Echols, Damien
Author:
Davis, Lorri
Publisher:
Plume
Subject:
Biography-Literary
Subject:
Biography - General
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20150526
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Illustrations:
b/w photos throughout
Pages:
448
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 1 lb
Age Level:
from 18

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Related Subjects


Biography » General
Biography » Literary
Featured Titles » Biography
History and Social Science » Crime » General
History and Social Science » Crime » Prisons and Prisoners
History and Social Science » Crime » True Crime

Life After Death Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$18.50 In Stock
Product details 448 pages Blue Rider Press - English 9780399160202 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Wrongly convicted at 18 along with two other teenagers and sentenced to death for the 1993 murder of three eight-year-old boys in West Memphis, Ark., Echols spent nearly two decades in prison before being released in August 2011. In this searing, finely wrought memoir, Echols recalls his poverty-stricken childhood, the trial of the West Memphis 3, and the harsh realities of life on death row. Sent there in 1994, Echols journaled consistently, though many notebooks were destroyed by guards. Echols describes death row as the equivalent of solitary confinement, his only human contact the infrequently allowed visitors from the outside world. Even sunlight and fresh air were denied at Varner Super Max, the facility he was transferred to in 2003. Echols recalls his less than ideal home life, with a mother who cultivated drama and a stepfather he despised (the feeling seems to have been mutual). The most affecting sections are Echols's philosophical musings on all he has lost, his thoughts often influenced by Zen Buddhism. In one journal entry that survived the guards' purge, Echols contemplates what he misses the most while in prison. The answer is a heart-wrenching and simple commentary on American prison life: 'In the end it's not the fruit I miss most... I miss being treated like a human being.' (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,
New York Times bestselling author Damien Echols and his wife Lorri Davis reveal their intimate and affecting letters, written while Echols was wrongfully imprisoned on death row.

An explosive bestseller, Life After Death turned a national spotlight on Damien Echols, who was just eighteen when he was wrongly condemned to death. But one of the most remarkable parts of his story still remained untold. After seeing a documentary about the and#147;West Memphis Three,and#8221; Lorri Davisand#151;a New Yorkbased landscape architectand#151;wrote him a letter, beginning a thirteen-year correspondence that witnessed their marriage while Echols was still on death row and culminated in Echolsand#8217; release in 2011. Sharing their private letters, Yours for Eternity is a must-read for the legions who followed the case as well as anyone who appreciates an extraordinary love story.

"Synopsis" by ,
The New York Times bestselling memoir by Damien Echols of the West Memphis Three, who was falsely convicted of three murders and spent nearly eighteen years on Death Rowand#151;Life After Death is destined to be a classic of explosive, riveting prison literature.
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