Master your Minecraft
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Tour our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Original Essays | November 7, 2014

    Karelia Stetz-Waters: IMG The Hot Sex Tip Cosmo Won't Tell You



    Cosmopolitan Magazine recently released an article titled "28 Mind-Blowing Lesbian Sex Positions." Where was this vital information when I was a... Continue »

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$6.50
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Local Warehouse Children's Picture Books- A to Z

I, Doko: The Tale of a Basket

by

I, Doko: The Tale of a Basket Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Doko is only a simple basket. It is not only grain from the field that he carries — he has also carried his master's child, and wood for the fire. He was there when the child became a man and married. And he very nearly had to carry the grandfather away forever. Luckily, someone wise beyond their years spoke up and made it possible for Doko to carry the grandfather home again instead.

As ever, Ed Young has taken a simple fable and made it into a masterpiece of stunning illustration and expert storytelling. This beautiful and unique book celebrates the generations with great originality.

Review:

"Young's (Lon Po Po) mixed-media artwork is stunning in this exquisitely designed book, but the often confusing, moralistic adaptation of a Nepalese folktale may be too inaccessible for some readers. As the ending suggests, the book tells how 'Wangal's love and respect for his grandfather inspired and transformed the whole village in how to treat elders.' Unfortunately, the story is told somewhat awkwardly in first-person by the family's large basket, Doko (which means 'basket' in Nepalese). Doko witnesses the events and features prominently in the story's resolution, but the basket acting as narrator serves to distance readers from the characters and makes for some clunky explanations. When the aged grandfather, Yeh-yeh, becomes a nuisance by inadvertently setting the house afire, Wangal's parents decide to leave the man on the temple steps for the priests to tend. Like an amateur thespian, Doko asks readers, 'What could I, a basket, do!' As his father carries Yeh-yeh away in the basket, young Wangal exposes his father's cruelty with his cathartic request: he asks his father to make sure he brings Doko back, because then he 'won't need to buy another Doko when you are old and it is time to leave you on the temple steps.' Accompanied by artistically sophisticated and emotionally powerful illustrations, the brief text mostly serves to summarize the story, and devotes little room to the relationships between characters. Despite the uplifting message and gilt-edged pages framing dramatically appealing artwork, this intergenerational story ultimately disappoints. Ages 4-up." Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Done in gouache, pastel, and collage, the pictures have graceful lines, subtle textures, and magnificent colors. With gold endpapers and gold edgings around each page, there's a timeless quality suited to the story. Lovely." School Library Journal

Review:

"A superb rendition of a tale with universal resonance." Horn Book Magazine

Review:

"As increasing numbers of families anticipate in-home care for elderly relatives, parents will want to share this story's poignant message with their children. The book may also inspire students' recastings of familiar tales from unusual points of view." Booklist

Review:

"Young's drawing incorporates the subtle elegance of Asian scrolls with the expressive force of Western art." Children's Literature

Synopsis:

The Caldecott Medalist has taken a simple fable about a basket that serves several generations of one family and turns it into a masterpiece of stunning illustration and expert storytelling. Full color.

About the Author

Caldecott medalist Ed Young was born in Tientsin, China, and brought up in Shanghai.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780399236259
Subtitle:
The Tale of a Basket
Author:
Young, Ed
Publisher:
Philomel
Location:
New York
Subject:
General
Subject:
Children's 4-8 - Picturebooks
Subject:
Family life
Subject:
People & Places - Asia
Subject:
Family - Daily Life
Subject:
Nepal
Subject:
Baskets
Subject:
Health & Daily Living - Daily Activities
Subject:
People & Places - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardback
Series Volume:
P0318.
Publication Date:
20041104
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
from P up to 3
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
32
Dimensions:
20 x 10 x 0.01 in 0.96 lb
Children's Book Type:
Picture / Wordless
Age Level:
04-08

Other books you might like

  1. Fairy Realm #06: The Unicorn Used Hardcover $6.50
  2. Fairy Realm #07: The Star Cloak Used Hardcover $7.95
  3. Fairy Realm #09: The Peskie Spell Used Hardcover $6.50
  4. The Artemis Fowl Files Used Book Club Paperback $3.50
  5. The Adventures of Captain Underpants...
    Used Trade Paper $4.00
  6. Happy Birthday, Addy!: A Springtime... Used Trade Paper $1.95

Related Subjects

Children's » Picture Books » A to Z

I, Doko: The Tale of a Basket Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$6.50 In Stock
Product details 32 pages Philomel Books - English 9780399236259 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Young's (Lon Po Po) mixed-media artwork is stunning in this exquisitely designed book, but the often confusing, moralistic adaptation of a Nepalese folktale may be too inaccessible for some readers. As the ending suggests, the book tells how 'Wangal's love and respect for his grandfather inspired and transformed the whole village in how to treat elders.' Unfortunately, the story is told somewhat awkwardly in first-person by the family's large basket, Doko (which means 'basket' in Nepalese). Doko witnesses the events and features prominently in the story's resolution, but the basket acting as narrator serves to distance readers from the characters and makes for some clunky explanations. When the aged grandfather, Yeh-yeh, becomes a nuisance by inadvertently setting the house afire, Wangal's parents decide to leave the man on the temple steps for the priests to tend. Like an amateur thespian, Doko asks readers, 'What could I, a basket, do!' As his father carries Yeh-yeh away in the basket, young Wangal exposes his father's cruelty with his cathartic request: he asks his father to make sure he brings Doko back, because then he 'won't need to buy another Doko when you are old and it is time to leave you on the temple steps.' Accompanied by artistically sophisticated and emotionally powerful illustrations, the brief text mostly serves to summarize the story, and devotes little room to the relationships between characters. Despite the uplifting message and gilt-edged pages framing dramatically appealing artwork, this intergenerational story ultimately disappoints. Ages 4-up." Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Done in gouache, pastel, and collage, the pictures have graceful lines, subtle textures, and magnificent colors. With gold endpapers and gold edgings around each page, there's a timeless quality suited to the story. Lovely."
"Review" by , "A superb rendition of a tale with universal resonance."
"Review" by , "As increasing numbers of families anticipate in-home care for elderly relatives, parents will want to share this story's poignant message with their children. The book may also inspire students' recastings of familiar tales from unusual points of view."
"Review" by , "Young's drawing incorporates the subtle elegance of Asian scrolls with the expressive force of Western art."
"Synopsis" by , The Caldecott Medalist has taken a simple fable about a basket that serves several generations of one family and turns it into a masterpiece of stunning illustration and expert storytelling. Full color.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.