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    The Enchanted

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3 Burnside Children's- Newbery Award Winners

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Feathers

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Feathers Cover

ISBN13: 9780399239892
ISBN10: 0399239898
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Review-A-Day

"I wondered how such a slender little novel would hold up under the weight of such topics as hope, healing, faith, and understanding. The answer is: It does — and without any heavy-handedness or manipulation on the part of the author." Jenny Sawyer, The Christian Science Monitor (read the entire CSM review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"Hope is the thing with feathers" starts the poem Frannie is reading in school. Frannie hasn't thought much about hope. There are so many other things to think about. Each day, her friend Samantha seems a bit more "holy." There is a new boy in class everyone is calling the Jesus Boy. And although the new boy looks like a white kid, he says he's not white. Who is he?

During a winter full of surprises, good and bad, Frannie starts seeing a lot of things in a new light — her brother Sean's deafness, her mother's fear, the class bully's anger, her best friend's faith, and her own desire for "the thing with feathers."

Jacqueline Woodson once again takes readers on a journey into a young girl's heart and reveals the pain and the joy of learning to look beneath the surface.

Review:

"Looking forward' is the message that runs through Woodson's (The House You Pass on the Way) novel. Narrator Frannie is fascinated with Emily Dickinson's poem, 'Hope is the thing with feathers/ that perches in the soul,' and grapples with its meaning, especially after a white student joins Frannie's all-black sixth-grade classroom. Trevor, the classroom bully, promptly nicknames him 'Jesus Boy,' because he is 'pale and his hair [is] long.' Frannie's best friend, Samantha, a preacher's daughter, starts to believe that the new boy truly could be Jesus ('If there was a world for Jesus to need to walk back into, wouldn't this one be it?'). The Jesus Boy's sense of calm and its effect on her classmates make Frannie wonder if there is some truth to Samantha'a musings, but a climactic faceoff between him and Trevor bring the newcomer's human flaws to light. Frannie's keen perceptions allow readers to observe a ripple of changes. Because she has experienced so much sadness in her life (her brother's deafness, her mother's miscarriages) the heroine is able to see beyond it all — to look forward to a time when the pain subsides and life continues. Set in 1971, Woodson's novel skillfully weaves in the music and events surrounding the rising opposition to the Vietnam War, giving this gentle, timeless story depth. She raises important questions about God, racial segregation and issues surrounding the hearing-impaired with a light and thoughtful touch. Ages 8-up. Agent: Charlotte Sheedy." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"The story ends with hope and thoughtfulness while speaking to those adolescents who struggle with race, faith, and prejudice." School Library Journal (Starred Review)

Review:

"[A] small, fast-moving novel that introduces big issues....Woodson tells her story with immediacy and realism....A good choice for discussion." Booklist

Review:

"[Frannie] is a wonderful role model for coming of age in a thoughtful way, and the book offers to teach us all about holding on to hope." Children's Literature

Synopsis:

A Newbery Honor winner takes readers on a journey into a young girl's heart and reveals the pain and joy of learning to look beneath the surface in this new novel.

Synopsis:

View our feature on Jacqueline Woodson's Feathers.

“Hope is the thing with feathers” starts the poem Frannie is reading in school. Frannie hasn’t thought much about hope. There are so many other things to think about. Each day, her friend Samantha seems a bit more “holy.” There is a new boy in class everyone is calling the Jesus Boy. And although the new boy looks like a white kid, he says he’s not white. Who is he?

During a winter full of surprises, good and bad, Frannie starts seeing a lot of things in a new light—her brother Sean’s deafness, her mother’s fear, the class bully’s anger, her best friend’s faith and her own desire for “the thing with feathers.”

Jacqueline Woodson once again takes readers on a journey into a young girl’s heart and reveals the pain and the joy of learning to look beneath the surface.

About the Author

Jacqueline Woodson, winner of the Margaret A. Edwards Award for lifetime achievement in writing for young adults, is the author of Newbery Honor winner Show Way, Miracle's Boys (recipient of a Coretta Scott King Award and a Los Angeles Times Book Prize), Locomotion and Hush (both National Book Award Finalists), among many others. She lives in Brooklyn, New York.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

crowyhead, October 18, 2007 (view all comments by crowyhead)
Normally, I find Woodson's novels to be spot-on -- she has a wonderful talent for packing a ton of character development and beauty into very short novels, like The House You Pass Along the Way and I Hadn't Meant to Tell You This. Feathers, while it is still an excellent novel, doesn't quite live up to its predecessors. Woodson tackles a lot of issues in this novel -- religion, race relations, deafness, hope in the face of dismal odds -- and she doesn't quite tie them all together as well as she normally does. Still, a lesser Woodson novel is still better than a lot of the other stuff out there, so it's still
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(4 of 9 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780399239892
Author:
Woodson, Jacqueline
Publisher:
Putnam Publishing Group
Subject:
Social Issues - Friendship
Subject:
Social Issues - Prejudice & Racism
Subject:
Family life
Subject:
Schools
Subject:
Situations / Friendship
Subject:
Family
Subject:
Religion
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction-Friendship
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction
Subject:
Ethnic - African American
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Picture book
Publication Date:
March 2007
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 7
Language:
English
Pages:
144
Dimensions:
8.58x5.92x.61 in. .54 lbs.
Age Level:
08-12

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Related Subjects

Children's » Awards » Newbery Award Winners
Young Adult » Fiction » Social Issues » Friendship
Young Adult » Fiction » Social Issues » Prejudice and Racism

Feathers Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$5.50 In Stock
Product details 144 pages Putnam Publishing Group - English 9780399239892 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Looking forward' is the message that runs through Woodson's (The House You Pass on the Way) novel. Narrator Frannie is fascinated with Emily Dickinson's poem, 'Hope is the thing with feathers/ that perches in the soul,' and grapples with its meaning, especially after a white student joins Frannie's all-black sixth-grade classroom. Trevor, the classroom bully, promptly nicknames him 'Jesus Boy,' because he is 'pale and his hair [is] long.' Frannie's best friend, Samantha, a preacher's daughter, starts to believe that the new boy truly could be Jesus ('If there was a world for Jesus to need to walk back into, wouldn't this one be it?'). The Jesus Boy's sense of calm and its effect on her classmates make Frannie wonder if there is some truth to Samantha'a musings, but a climactic faceoff between him and Trevor bring the newcomer's human flaws to light. Frannie's keen perceptions allow readers to observe a ripple of changes. Because she has experienced so much sadness in her life (her brother's deafness, her mother's miscarriages) the heroine is able to see beyond it all — to look forward to a time when the pain subsides and life continues. Set in 1971, Woodson's novel skillfully weaves in the music and events surrounding the rising opposition to the Vietnam War, giving this gentle, timeless story depth. She raises important questions about God, racial segregation and issues surrounding the hearing-impaired with a light and thoughtful touch. Ages 8-up. Agent: Charlotte Sheedy." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review A Day" by , "I wondered how such a slender little novel would hold up under the weight of such topics as hope, healing, faith, and understanding. The answer is: It does — and without any heavy-handedness or manipulation on the part of the author." (read the entire CSM review)
"Review" by , "The story ends with hope and thoughtfulness while speaking to those adolescents who struggle with race, faith, and prejudice."
"Review" by , "[A] small, fast-moving novel that introduces big issues....Woodson tells her story with immediacy and realism....A good choice for discussion."
"Review" by , "[Frannie] is a wonderful role model for coming of age in a thoughtful way, and the book offers to teach us all about holding on to hope."
"Synopsis" by , A Newbery Honor winner takes readers on a journey into a young girl's heart and reveals the pain and joy of learning to look beneath the surface in this new novel.
"Synopsis" by ,
View our feature on Jacqueline Woodson's Feathers.

“Hope is the thing with feathers” starts the poem Frannie is reading in school. Frannie hasn’t thought much about hope. There are so many other things to think about. Each day, her friend Samantha seems a bit more “holy.” There is a new boy in class everyone is calling the Jesus Boy. And although the new boy looks like a white kid, he says he’s not white. Who is he?

During a winter full of surprises, good and bad, Frannie starts seeing a lot of things in a new light—her brother Sean’s deafness, her mother’s fear, the class bully’s anger, her best friend’s faith and her own desire for “the thing with feathers.”

Jacqueline Woodson once again takes readers on a journey into a young girl’s heart and reveals the pain and the joy of learning to look beneath the surface.

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