Signed Edition Sweepstakes
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | September 30, 2014

Brian Doyle: IMG The Rude Burl of Our Masks



One day when I was 12 years old and setting off on my newspaper route after school my mom said will you stop at the doctor's and pick up something... Continue »
  1. $13.27 Sale Trade Paper add to wish list

    Children and Other Wild Animals

    Brian Doyle 9780870717543

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$9.50
List price: $15.99
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Burnside Children's- Newbery Award Winners

After Tupac and D Foster

by

After Tupac and D Foster Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

D Foster showed up a few months before Tupac got shot that first time and left us the summer before he died.

The day D Foster enters Neeka and her best friend’s lives, the world opens up for them. D comes from a world vastly different from their safe Queens neighborhood, and through her, the girls see another side of life that includes loss, foster families and an amount of freedom that makes the girls envious. Although all of them are crazy about Tupac Shakur’s rap music, D is the one who truly understands the place where he’s coming from, and through knowing D, Tupac’s lyrics become more personal for all of them.

The girls are thirteen when D’s mom swoops in to reclaim D—and as magically as she appeared, she now disappears from their lives. Tupac is gone, too, after another shooting; this time fatal. As the narrator looks back, she sees lives suspended in time, and realizes that even all-too-brief connections can touch deeply.

A Discussion Guide to After Tupac and D Foster by Jacqueline Woodson

Review:

"As she did in Feathers with the poetry of Emily Dickinson, Woodson here invokes the music of the late rapper Tupac Shakur, whose songs address the inequalities confronting many African-Americans. In 1994, the anonymous narrator is 11, and Tupac has been shot. Everyone in her safe Queens neighborhood is listening to his music and talking about him, even though the world he sings about seems remote to her. Meanwhile D, a foster child, meets the narrator and her best friend, Neeka, while roaming around the city by herself ('She's like from another planet. The Planet of the Free,' Neeka later remarks). They become close, calling themselves Three the Hard Way, and Tupac's music becomes a soundtrack for the two years they spend together. Early on, when Tupac sings, ''Brenda's Got a Baby,'' about a girl putting her baby in a trash can, D explains, ''He sings about the things that I'm living,'' and Neeka and the narrator become aware of all the ''stuff we ain't gonna know [about D],'' who never does tell them where she lives or who her mother is. The story ends in 1996 with Tupac's untimely death and the reappearance of D's mother, who takes D with her, out of roaming range. Woodson delicately unfolds issues about race and less obvious forms of oppression as the narrator becomes aware of them; occasionally, the plot feels manipulated toward that purpose. Even so, the subtlety and depth with which the author conveys the girls' relationships lend this novel exceptional vividness and staying power. Ages 12-up." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Those who think, as I do, that Jacqueline Woodson's books sometimes muss the fine line between poignant and sentimental — last year's 'Feathers' being an example — have a surprise in store for them with this slender, note-perfect novel. Two 11-year-old girls lead a happy but sheltered life in 1990s Queens, New York, reined in hard by their no-nonsense mamas yet dreaming all the while of the wider,... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Synopsis:

A Newbery Honor book. A lot can happen to three girls in a two-year period--especially when the rap music of Tupac Shakur is the glue holding them together.

Synopsis:

The day D Foster enters Neeka and her best friend’s lives, the world opens up for them. Suddenly they’re keenly aware of things beyond their block in Queens, things that are happening in the world—like the shooting of Tupac Shakur—and in search of their Big Purpose in life. When—all too soon—D’s mom swoops in to reclaim her, and Tupac dies, they are left with a sense of how quickly things can change and how even all-too-brief connections can touch deeply.

A Discussion Guide to After Tupac and D Foster by Jacqueline Woodson

Video

About the Author

Jacqueline Woodso‛s poignant writing rings true in the voice of her naiveĀ—but perceptiveĀ—narrator, who, like her friends, yearns to understand the world and find her Big Purpose in life.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780399246548
Author:
Woodson, Jacqueline
Publisher:
Putnam Publishing Group
Subject:
Friendship
Subject:
Queens (New York, N.Y.)
Subject:
Social Issues - Friendship
Subject:
Family - Orphans & Foster Homes
Subject:
Performing Arts - Music
Subject:
Situations / Friendship
Subject:
Coming of age
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction-Friendship
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Paperback / softback
Publication Date:
20080131
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 5 up to AND UP
Language:
English
Pages:
176
Dimensions:
8.44x5.77x.71 in. .63 lbs.
Age Level:
10-12

Other books you might like

  1. Trouble
    Sale Trade Paper $4.98
  2. The Underneath
    Used Hardcover $7.95
  3. The Littles (Little Apple)
    Used Trade Paper $2.50
  4. Savvy
    Used Trade Paper $2.50
  5. Tasting the Sky: A Palestinian Childhood
    Used Hardcover $10.00
  6. A Couple of Boys Have the Best Week Ever
    Used Hardcover $2.50

Related Subjects

Children's » Awards » Newbery Award Winners
Children's » General
Children's » Middle Readers » Newbery Award Winners
Children's » Performing Arts » Music
Young Adult » Fiction » Social Issues » Friendship
Young Adult » General

After Tupac and D Foster Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$9.50 In Stock
Product details 176 pages Putnam Publishing Group - English 9780399246548 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "As she did in Feathers with the poetry of Emily Dickinson, Woodson here invokes the music of the late rapper Tupac Shakur, whose songs address the inequalities confronting many African-Americans. In 1994, the anonymous narrator is 11, and Tupac has been shot. Everyone in her safe Queens neighborhood is listening to his music and talking about him, even though the world he sings about seems remote to her. Meanwhile D, a foster child, meets the narrator and her best friend, Neeka, while roaming around the city by herself ('She's like from another planet. The Planet of the Free,' Neeka later remarks). They become close, calling themselves Three the Hard Way, and Tupac's music becomes a soundtrack for the two years they spend together. Early on, when Tupac sings, ''Brenda's Got a Baby,'' about a girl putting her baby in a trash can, D explains, ''He sings about the things that I'm living,'' and Neeka and the narrator become aware of all the ''stuff we ain't gonna know [about D],'' who never does tell them where she lives or who her mother is. The story ends in 1996 with Tupac's untimely death and the reappearance of D's mother, who takes D with her, out of roaming range. Woodson delicately unfolds issues about race and less obvious forms of oppression as the narrator becomes aware of them; occasionally, the plot feels manipulated toward that purpose. Even so, the subtlety and depth with which the author conveys the girls' relationships lend this novel exceptional vividness and staying power. Ages 12-up." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , A Newbery Honor book. A lot can happen to three girls in a two-year period--especially when the rap music of Tupac Shakur is the glue holding them together.
"Synopsis" by ,

The day D Foster enters Neeka and her best friend’s lives, the world opens up for them. Suddenly they’re keenly aware of things beyond their block in Queens, things that are happening in the world—like the shooting of Tupac Shakur—and in search of their Big Purpose in life. When—all too soon—D’s mom swoops in to reclaim her, and Tupac dies, they are left with a sense of how quickly things can change and how even all-too-brief connections can touch deeply.

A Discussion Guide to After Tupac and D Foster by Jacqueline Woodson

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves ā€” plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts ā€” here at Powells.com.