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Henry's Freedom Box

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Henry's Freedom Box Cover

ISBN13: 9780439777339
ISBN10: 043977733x
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A poignant story celebrating the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation
 
It’s 1862 and the Civil War has turned out to be a long, deadly conflict. Hope’s father can’t stand the waiting a minute longer and decides to join the Union army to fight for freedom. He slips away one tearful night, leaving Hope, who knows she may never see her father again, with only a conch shell for comfort. Its sound, Papa says, echoes the promised song of freedom. It’s a long wait for freedom and on the nights when the cannons roar, Papa seems farther away than ever. But then Lincoln finally does it: on January 1, 1863, he issues the Emancipation Proclamation, freeing the slaves, and a joyful Hope finally spies the outline of a familiar man standing on the horizon.
 
Affectingly written and gorgeously illustrated, Hope’s Gift captures a significant moment in American history with deep emotion and a lot of charm.

Review:

"Levine (Freedom's Children) recounts the true story of Henry Brown, a slave who mailed himself to freedom. Thanks to Nelson's (Ellington Was Not a Street) penetrating portraits, readers will feel as if they can experience Henry's thoughts and feelings as he matures through unthinkable adversity. As a boy, separated from his mother, he goes to work in his new master's tobacco factory and eventually meets and marries another slave, with whom he has three children. In a heartwrenching scene depicted in a dramatically shaded pencil, watercolor and oil illustration, Henry watches as his family — suddenly sold in the slave market — disappears down the road. Henry then enlists the help of an abolitionist doctor and mails himself in a wooden crate 'to a place where there are no slaves!' He travels by horse-drawn cart, steamboat and train before his box is delivered to the Philadelphia address of the doctor's friends on March 30, 1849. Alongside Henry's anguished thoughts en route, Nelson's clever cutaway images reveal the man in his cramped quarters (at times upside-down). A concluding note provides answers to questions that readers may wish had been integrated into the story line, such as where did Henry begin his journey? (Richmond, Va.); how long did it take? (27 hours). Readers never learn about Henry's life as a free man — or, perhaps unavoidably, whether he was ever reunited with his family. Still, these powerful illustrations will make readers feel as if they have gained insight into a resourceful man and his extraordinary story. Ages 4-8." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

Learn about the courageous Americans who journeyed on the Oregon Trail in this picture book perfect for the Common Core

Its 1848, and brave families band together in covered wagons to head west. Each spread introduces a different speaker to tell his or her part of the story: theres Carl Hawks, son of the wagon train leader; Louisa Bailey, the newlywed; Chankoowashtay, a Sioux brave; and more. Like its acclaimed predecessor Colonial Voices, this book showcases a thrilling—and often dangerous—time in our history. Richly detailed illustrations bring the story of the great Westward Expansion to vivid life.

Synopsis:

In this powerful story, Levine weaves together the extraordinary events in the life of Henry "Box" Brown, who as a young boy hid in a wooden crate in one of the most amazing escapes using the Underground Railroad. Full color.

About the Author

How did people escape on the Underground Railroad? What was it like to land on Ellis Island?How did it feel to travel the Oregon Trail in a covered wagon? Ellen Levine has revealed worldsof fascinating adventure with her nonfiction books for young readers.

Although Ellen Levine enjoys reading and writing fiction, most of her books for young readershave been nonfiction. “Writing nonfiction lets me in behind the scenes of the story. I enjoylearning new things and meeting new people, even if they lived 200 years ago.”

“Real heroes,” Levine says, “aren't necessarily on TV or in the news. They can be ordinarypeople who are willing to take risks for causes they believe in. Nonfiction offers a way tointroduce young readers to real people who have shown tremendous courage, even when facedwith great danger. All of us have the potential. And one doesn't have to be a grown-up,” sheadds.

When she's not writing, Levine likes to share the excitement of research and the importance ofaccuracy with young readers. “Many young people think research is dull; you go to anencyclopedia, copy information, give it a title, and call it a report.” Using her books asexamples, Ellen explains how to get other, more interesting information. “I may not mention theexact words, but I talk to young people about primary and secondary sources. If I'm speakingwith third graders, I ask them, 'Where would I go if I wanted to find out what it's like to be athird grader?' Most will say, 'Read a book.' But when they say, 'Ask a third grader,' I knowthey've understood what I mean by a primary source of inspiration.”

For If You Were an Animal Doctor, for example, Ellen witnessed an emergency operation on acow. While doing research in Wyoming for Ready, Aim, Fire!, her biography of Annie Oakley,she got to hold the gun Ms. Oakley is believed to have shot in the presence of the Queen ofEngland. “It gave me such a strong feeling about this person,” she says. “That's part of research,too.”

Ellen Levine is the author of many acclaimed books, both fiction and nonfiction. Among them:If You Traveled West in a Covered Wagon, If Your Name Was Changed at Ellis Island, I Hate English!, If You Lived at the Time of Martin Luther King, and Secret Missions. Her recent book, Freedom's Children: Young Civil Rights Activists Tell Their Own Stories, was named one of the Ten Best Children's Books of the Year by The New York Times, and Best Book for Young Adults by the American Library Association.

Ellen divides her time between New York City and Salem, New York.

Kadir Nelson illustrated two Caldecott Honor Books: MOSES and HENRY'S FREEDOM BOX. ELLINGTON WAS NOT A STREET by Ntozake Shange won the Coretta Scott King Award. Will Smiths JUST THE TWO OF US won an NAACP Image Award, and his new book, WE ARE THE SHIP continues to garner major awards. Nelson showed artistic talent at age 3 and began working in oils by age 16. He lives with his family in San Diego, California.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 3 comments:

teacher in the desert, January 29, 2011 (view all comments by teacher in the desert)
As a teacher, I have read this book to and with kids from kindergarten to fifth grade, and they all love it. The story--a true story from the days of the Underground Railroad--is simply told, the language is easy to understand without being babyish, there are many teachable aspects, the art is very good--I could go on and on, but suffice to say that it's one of the best read-aloud children's books around. I usually do a lesson cycle of a week based on this book alone, and it's never failed to be a huge success.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
bgparlour, January 20, 2010 (view all comments by bgparlour)
Henry's Freedom Box is an incredible book for people of all ages, ethnicities and backgrounds. It not only gives the reader insight into many truths of slavery-- the negative, as we see Henry and his family being torn apart, and the postitive, as we discover white men who are willing to help Henry make it to freedom (an aspect we do not often see in stories of slavery). Henry's Freedom Box also has incredible illustrations that help the story really come to life. This book is very useful for lessons on slavery and art lessons, as well.
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(2 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)
antone, February 7, 2009 (view all comments by antone)
This one of the best books ever read.
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(4 of 5 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 3 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780439777339
Author:
Levine, Ellen
Publisher:
Scholastic Press
Illustrator:
Nelson, Kadir
Author:
Day, Larry
Author:
Lyons, Kelly Starling
Author:
Winters, Kay
Author:
e, Don
Author:
Nelson, Kadir
Author:
Tat
Author:
Tate, Don
Subject:
Historical - United States - 19th Century
Subject:
Slavery
Subject:
Underground railroad
Subject:
Situations / Prejudice & Racism
Subject:
People & Places - United States - African-American
Subject:
Social Issues - Prejudice & Racism
Subject:
African Americans
Subject:
Children s-Historical Fiction-U.S. 19th Century
Subject:
Ethnic - African American
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Publication Date:
20070131
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from P up to 3
Language:
English
Illustrations:
YES
Pages:
40
Dimensions:
11 x 9 in
Children's Book Type:
Picture / Wordless
Age Level:
04-08

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Related Subjects


Children's » Awards » Caldecott Award Winners
Children's » General
Children's » Historical Fiction » United States » 19th Century
Children's » History » United States » General
Children's » Nonfiction » African American Studies
Children's » Nonfiction » US History
History and Social Science » US History » General

Henry's Freedom Box Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$12.95 In Stock
Product details 40 pages Scholastic Press - English 9780439777339 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Levine (Freedom's Children) recounts the true story of Henry Brown, a slave who mailed himself to freedom. Thanks to Nelson's (Ellington Was Not a Street) penetrating portraits, readers will feel as if they can experience Henry's thoughts and feelings as he matures through unthinkable adversity. As a boy, separated from his mother, he goes to work in his new master's tobacco factory and eventually meets and marries another slave, with whom he has three children. In a heartwrenching scene depicted in a dramatically shaded pencil, watercolor and oil illustration, Henry watches as his family — suddenly sold in the slave market — disappears down the road. Henry then enlists the help of an abolitionist doctor and mails himself in a wooden crate 'to a place where there are no slaves!' He travels by horse-drawn cart, steamboat and train before his box is delivered to the Philadelphia address of the doctor's friends on March 30, 1849. Alongside Henry's anguished thoughts en route, Nelson's clever cutaway images reveal the man in his cramped quarters (at times upside-down). A concluding note provides answers to questions that readers may wish had been integrated into the story line, such as where did Henry begin his journey? (Richmond, Va.); how long did it take? (27 hours). Readers never learn about Henry's life as a free man — or, perhaps unavoidably, whether he was ever reunited with his family. Still, these powerful illustrations will make readers feel as if they have gained insight into a resourceful man and his extraordinary story. Ages 4-8." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by ,
Learn about the courageous Americans who journeyed on the Oregon Trail in this picture book perfect for the Common Core

Its 1848, and brave families band together in covered wagons to head west. Each spread introduces a different speaker to tell his or her part of the story: theres Carl Hawks, son of the wagon train leader; Louisa Bailey, the newlywed; Chankoowashtay, a Sioux brave; and more. Like its acclaimed predecessor Colonial Voices, this book showcases a thrilling—and often dangerous—time in our history. Richly detailed illustrations bring the story of the great Westward Expansion to vivid life.

"Synopsis" by , In this powerful story, Levine weaves together the extraordinary events in the life of Henry "Box" Brown, who as a young boy hid in a wooden crate in one of the most amazing escapes using the Underground Railroad. Full color.
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