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The Nuclear Jihadist: The True Story of the Man Who Sold the World's Most Dangerous Secrets...and How We Could Have Stopped Him

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The Nuclear Jihadist: The True Story of the Man Who Sold the World's Most Dangerous Secrets...and How We Could Have Stopped Him Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The world has entered a second nuclear age. For the first time since the end of the Cold War, the threat of nuclear annihilation is on the rise. Should such an assault occur, there is a strong likelihood that the trail of devastation will lead back to Abdul Qadeer Khan, the Pakistani father of the Islamic bomb and the mastermind behind a vast clandestine enterprise that has sold nuclear secrets to Iran, North Korea, and Libya. Khan's loose-knit organization was and still may be a nuclear Wal-Mart, selling weapons blueprints, parts, and the expertise to assemble the works into a do-it-yourself bomb kit. Amazingly, American authorities could have halted his operation, but they chose instead to watch and wait. Khan proved that the international safeguards the world relied on no longer worked.

Journalists Douglas Frantz and Catherine Collins tell this alarming tale of international intrigue through the eyes of the European and American officials who suspected Khan, tracked him, and ultimately shut him down, but only after the nuclear genie was long out of the bottle.

Review:

"In tackling the story of Pakistani nuclear scientist A.Q. Khan, Frantz and Collins (Death on the Black Sea) are entering a crowded field. As Adrian Levy and Catherine Scott-Clark did in Deception (reviewed July 30), this husband-and-wife team divides attention between Khan's influence over Pakistan's nuclear program and how the American government ignored evidence of his progress because Pakistan served as a convenient ally. While much of this story is familiar, Frantz and Collins do provide more detail on Khan's background and draw on several different U.S. sources. (They reveal, for example, that the State Department discussed assassinating Khan as far back as 1978.) They also give the Pakistani government more benefit of the doubt than most other commentators: an internal corruption investigation ordered by Pervez Musharraf shortly after he became Pakistan's president is interpreted as suggesting that Khan's dealing with nations like Libya and Iran might not have been sanctioned by his government. Deception has more about Pakistan's internal politics and an edge in readability and 'zing,' but this is an equally serviceable overview. (Dec. 3)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Abdul Qadeer Khan's sale of nuclear technology to rogue nations is no longer a secret. The Pakistani physicist, revered in his homeland as the father of the Islamic bomb, was forced to confess his 'unauthorized proliferation activities' on Pakistan's state television in 2004. He has been confined to house (more accurately, mansion) arrest ever since.

But the staged confession and... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Synopsis:

Journalists Douglas Frantz and Catherine Collins tell the alarming tale of Abdul Qadeer Khan--the Pakistani mastermind behind a vast clandestine enterprise that sold nuclear secrets to governments around the world. Although the U.S. ultimately shut him down, it was only after the nuclear genie was long out of the bottle.

About the Author

Douglas Frantz is managing editor of the Los Angeles Times, where he has been a business reporter, an investigative reporter, and a foreign correspondent based in Istanbul. He has also been a reporter for the New York Times and the Chicago Tribune. He is a two-time Pulitzer Prize finalist and has won several honors for his investigative reporting.

Catherine Collins has been a reporter for The Chicago Tribune and written for The Los Angeles Times and The New York Times. She has authored several books with her husband, Douglas Frantz, including Celebration and Death on the Black Sea.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780446199575
Subtitle:
The True Story of the World's Most Dangerous Nuclear Smuggler
Author:
Frantz, Douglas
Author:
Frantz
Author:
Collins, Catherine
Publisher:
Twelve
Subject:
Espionage
Subject:
Nuclear nonproliferation
Subject:
Security, international
Subject:
International Relations - Arms Control
Subject:
Military - Nuclear Warfare
Subject:
Nuclear terrorism
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20081111
Binding:
Hardcover
Language:
English
Pages:
432
Dimensions:
9.08x6.48x1.37 in. 1.47 lbs.

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Crime » True Crime
History and Social Science » Military » Terrorism Mercenaries and Guerrillas
History and Social Science » Military » Weapons » General

The Nuclear Jihadist: The True Story of the Man Who Sold the World's Most Dangerous Secrets...and How We Could Have Stopped Him Used Hardcover
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$7.95 In Stock
Product details 432 pages Twelve - English 9780446199575 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In tackling the story of Pakistani nuclear scientist A.Q. Khan, Frantz and Collins (Death on the Black Sea) are entering a crowded field. As Adrian Levy and Catherine Scott-Clark did in Deception (reviewed July 30), this husband-and-wife team divides attention between Khan's influence over Pakistan's nuclear program and how the American government ignored evidence of his progress because Pakistan served as a convenient ally. While much of this story is familiar, Frantz and Collins do provide more detail on Khan's background and draw on several different U.S. sources. (They reveal, for example, that the State Department discussed assassinating Khan as far back as 1978.) They also give the Pakistani government more benefit of the doubt than most other commentators: an internal corruption investigation ordered by Pervez Musharraf shortly after he became Pakistan's president is interpreted as suggesting that Khan's dealing with nations like Libya and Iran might not have been sanctioned by his government. Deception has more about Pakistan's internal politics and an edge in readability and 'zing,' but this is an equally serviceable overview. (Dec. 3)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , Journalists Douglas Frantz and Catherine Collins tell the alarming tale of Abdul Qadeer Khan--the Pakistani mastermind behind a vast clandestine enterprise that sold nuclear secrets to governments around the world. Although the U.S. ultimately shut him down, it was only after the nuclear genie was long out of the bottle.
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