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Spooner

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Spooner Cover

ISBN13: 9780446540728
ISBN10: 0446540722
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

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Awards

The Rooster 2010 Morning News Tournament of Books Nominee

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Warren Spooner was born after a prolonged delivery in a makeshift delivery room in a doctor's office in Milledgeville, Georgia, on the first Saturday of December, 1956. His father died shortly afterward, long before Spooner had even a memory of his face, and was replaced eventually by a once-brilliant young naval officer, Calmer Ottosson, recently court-martialed out of service. This is the story of the lifelong tie between the two men, poles apart, of Spooner's troubled childhood, troubled adolescence, violent and troubled adulthood and Calmer Ottosson's inexhaustible patience, undertaking a life-long struggle to salvage his stepson, a man he will never understand.

Review:

"What can you do when your twin brother, dead at birth, is your mother's favorite? This is only one of the burdens placed on young Warren Spooner, the hero of National Book Award-winner Dexter's calamitously funny and riotously tragic new novel. Spooner, who tends toward a life of criminal mischief, turns out to be a baseball phenom, but after an elbow injury puts an end to his pitching career, he ends up a newspaper reporter in Philadelphia, where he's so universally disliked that firing him is at the top of his editor's to-do list. Spooner eventually settles down, becomes a columnist and published novelist, and starts a family. He is dogged, though, by a combination of bad luck and bad judgment, and eventually retreats to Whidbey Island, off the coast of Washington State, where he learns that good fences don't necessarily make good neighbors. Spooner's story is juxtaposed with that of his stepfather, Calmer Ottosson, a naval officer turned high school principal, whose dedication to his family is in direct contrast to his stepson's bellicose adventures. Although raggedly plotted, the rambunctious narrative is filled with hilarious scenes, including a naval burial at sea that goes horribly awry, a literary luncheon featuring Spooner and Margaret Truman that ends with a stampede of little old ladies, and a misguided act of vengeance that backfires and puts Spooner in the hospital. The novel's premise — that life is one big vale of tears and that writing about it wittily and exuberantly is the best one can do — might not work in real life, but it pays off in spades for Dexter and his tragicomically conflicted alter ego. (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Dexter's prose is razor sharp, and every page has at least one zinger. The Georgia section in particular will remind readers of the great Harry Crews. Don't miss this." Library Journal (starred review)

Review:

"So, this book is different! Not exactly what Pete Dexter usually writes, but madly interesting in what it sets out to do. I freely admit to a bias: As far as I'm concerned, Dexter can do no wrong." The Washington Post Book World

Review:

"This is vintage Dexter, offering gems of writing and observation on nearly every page....For all the author's riotous humor, much of the material is black as anthracite, and burns just as hot. Spooner reaffirms Dexter's place in the first ranks of contemporary novelists." Denver Post

Review:

"Spooner is a fat book, and it has an episodic quality that is its strength and weakness....[W]hatever it might lack in narrative drive, Spooner more than makes up for in feeling and in linguistic riches." The Portland Oregonian

Review:

"Pete Dexter, writing of the part played by love in the exuberant life of his hero, Spooner, and the fatal inevitability of the compromises that make life bearable, has given us a novel of picaresque vitality — outlandish, anecdotal, profuse, funny, profound." Susanna Moore, author of My Old Sweetheart and In the Cut

Review:

"Spooner, his funniest novel, is driven by spare, pitch-perfect sentences....Part of the beauty of Spooner is its droll, working-class lack of ambition — at least ambition as it's popularly practiced." USA Today

About the Author

Pete Dexter is the author of the National Book Award-winning novel Paris Trout and five other novels: God's Pocket, Deadwood, Brotherly Love, The Paperboy, and Train. He has been a columnist for the Philadelphia Daily News and the Sacramento Bee, and has contributed to many magazines, including Esquire, Sports Illustrated, and Playboy. His screenplays include Rush and Mulholland Falls. Dexter was born in Michigan and raised in Georgia, Illinois, and eastern South Dakota. He lives on an island off the coast of Washington.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

James Reed, January 1, 2012 (view all comments by James Reed)
This is a dead serious book with a riotous sense of humor, Pete Dexter working on all cylinders. I highly recommend it for the reader of literary fiction and for those who ordinarily might hesitate, especially given its length.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
Mary S Egan, January 2, 2010 (view all comments by Mary S Egan)
I love the way Pete Dexter writes. I love reading
Pete Dexter. And, he's getting better. This is
his best yet.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 1 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 2 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780446540728
Author:
Dexter, Pete
Publisher:
Grand Central Publishing
Subject:
Domestic fiction
Subject:
Psychological fiction
Subject:
Literary
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20101025
Binding:
Hardcover
Language:
English
Pages:
496
Dimensions:
8 x 5.25 x 1.5 in 0.93 lb

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » Sale Books

Spooner Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$6.50 In Stock
Product details 496 pages Grand Central Publishing - English 9780446540728 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "What can you do when your twin brother, dead at birth, is your mother's favorite? This is only one of the burdens placed on young Warren Spooner, the hero of National Book Award-winner Dexter's calamitously funny and riotously tragic new novel. Spooner, who tends toward a life of criminal mischief, turns out to be a baseball phenom, but after an elbow injury puts an end to his pitching career, he ends up a newspaper reporter in Philadelphia, where he's so universally disliked that firing him is at the top of his editor's to-do list. Spooner eventually settles down, becomes a columnist and published novelist, and starts a family. He is dogged, though, by a combination of bad luck and bad judgment, and eventually retreats to Whidbey Island, off the coast of Washington State, where he learns that good fences don't necessarily make good neighbors. Spooner's story is juxtaposed with that of his stepfather, Calmer Ottosson, a naval officer turned high school principal, whose dedication to his family is in direct contrast to his stepson's bellicose adventures. Although raggedly plotted, the rambunctious narrative is filled with hilarious scenes, including a naval burial at sea that goes horribly awry, a literary luncheon featuring Spooner and Margaret Truman that ends with a stampede of little old ladies, and a misguided act of vengeance that backfires and puts Spooner in the hospital. The novel's premise — that life is one big vale of tears and that writing about it wittily and exuberantly is the best one can do — might not work in real life, but it pays off in spades for Dexter and his tragicomically conflicted alter ego. (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Dexter's prose is razor sharp, and every page has at least one zinger. The Georgia section in particular will remind readers of the great Harry Crews. Don't miss this."
"Review" by , "So, this book is different! Not exactly what Pete Dexter usually writes, but madly interesting in what it sets out to do. I freely admit to a bias: As far as I'm concerned, Dexter can do no wrong."
"Review" by , "This is vintage Dexter, offering gems of writing and observation on nearly every page....For all the author's riotous humor, much of the material is black as anthracite, and burns just as hot. Spooner reaffirms Dexter's place in the first ranks of contemporary novelists."
"Review" by , "Spooner is a fat book, and it has an episodic quality that is its strength and weakness....[W]hatever it might lack in narrative drive, Spooner more than makes up for in feeling and in linguistic riches."
"Review" by , "Pete Dexter, writing of the part played by love in the exuberant life of his hero, Spooner, and the fatal inevitability of the compromises that make life bearable, has given us a novel of picaresque vitality — outlandish, anecdotal, profuse, funny, profound."
"Review" by , "Spooner, his funniest novel, is driven by spare, pitch-perfect sentences....Part of the beauty of Spooner is its droll, working-class lack of ambition — at least ambition as it's popularly practiced."
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