It's Raining Books Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | September 15, 2014

Lois Leveen: IMG Forsooth Me Not: Shakespeare, Juliet, Her Nurse, and a Novel



There's this writer, William Shakespeare. Perhaps you've heard of him. He wrote this play, Romeo and Juliet. Maybe you've heard of it as well. It's... Continue »
  1. $18.19 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    Juliet's Nurse

    Lois Leveen 9781476757445

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$7.95
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Burnside Mystery- A to Z

Innocent

by

Innocent Cover

ISBN13: 9780446562423
ISBN10: 0446562424
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $7.95!

 

Awards

Review-A-Day

"What distinguishes Turow's work from boilerplate thrillers is his skill as a writer. Not only does he make the legal developments spellbinding — giving us just enough terminology and procedure to follow along, without cramming the information down our throats — but he makes the characters comes alive just as vividly. They often behave badly and make questionable choices (who doesn't?), and those actions are always believable and strike a note of truth that is sometimes lacking in popular fiction." Chris Bolton, Powells.com (Read the entire Powells.com review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The sequel to the genre-defining, landmark bestseller Presumed Innocent, Innocent continues the story of Rusty Sabich and Tommy Molto who are, 20 years later, pitted against each other in a riveting psychological match.

Review:

"Mesmerizing prose and intricate plotting lift Turow's superlative legal thriller, his best novel since his bestselling debut, Presumed Innocent, to which this is a sequel. In 2008, 22 years after the events of the earlier book, former lawyer Rusty Sabich, now a Kindle County, Ill., chief appellate judge, is again suspected of murdering a woman close to him. His wife, Barbara, has died in her bed of what appear to be natural causes, yet Rusty comes under scrutiny from his old nemesis, acting prosecuting attorney Tommy Molto, who unsuccessfully prosecuted him for killing his mistress decades earlier. Tommy's chief deputy, Jim Brand, is suspicious because Rusty chose to keep Barbara's death a secret, even from their son, Nat, for almost an entire day, which could have allowed traces of poison to disappear. Rusty's candidacy for a higher court in an imminent election; his recent clandestine affair with his attractive law clerk, Anna Vostic; and a breach of judicial ethics complicate matters further. Once again, Turow displays an uncanny ability for making the passions and contradictions of his main characters accessible and understandable." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Scott Turow's new novel is the dedicated fiction-reader's version of El Dorado: a driving, unputdownable courtroom drama/murder mystery that is also a literary treasure, written in language that sparkles with clarity and resonates with honest character insight. I came away feeling amazed and fulfilled, as we only do when we read novelists at the height of their powers. Put this one on your don't-miss list." Stephen King

Review:

"[A] fast and absorbing ride....Rusty's second trial — which takes up the better half of this novel — proves to be just as suspenseful and gripping as his first." Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times

Review:

"This is a beautifully written book with finely drawn characters and an intricate plot seamlessly weaving a troubled family story with a murder. Drawing the reader in and not letting go until the last page, Turow's legal thriller is a most worthy successor to Presumed Innocent and perhaps the author's finest work to date." Library Journal (starred review)

Review:

"There are enough surprises in all this to keep the reader's attention fixed — Turow has always been very good at that — but as usual in his fiction there's more than skillful legal drama....All of which makes for an intelligent, thoughtful novel: a grownup book for grownup readers." The Washington Post Book World

Review:

"After reading Innocent...I had an urge to turn back to page one and start over to see where the clues and feints were. It's that good.... The plot twists are augmented by canny observations and richly captured personalities." Chicago Sun-Times

Review:

"Innocent is a meticulously constructed and superbly paced mystery, full of twists and surprises and the sort of technical arcana on which the genre thrives....This is a lovely novel, gripping and darkly self-reflective." Terrence Rafferty, The New York Times Book Review

Review:

"Though Innocent is a richer read for those who have read Presumed Innocent, it stands alone with ease....Adding that internal conflict to ambition, sorrow, and righteousness — with murder, adultery and careers at stake — makes for an easy summary judgment: Innocent is anything but a guilty pleasure, it's prime popular fiction." The Christian Science Monitor

Synopsis:

In Thomas Perrys Edgar-winning debut The Butchers Boy, a professional killer betrayed by the Mafia leaves countless mobsters dead and then disappears. Justice Department official Elizabeth Waring is the only one who believes he ever existed. Many years later, the Butchers Boy finds his peaceful life threatened when a Mafia hit team finally catches up with him. He knows they wont stop coming and decides to take the fight to their door. 

Soon Waring, now high up in the Organized Crime Division of the Justice Department, receives a surprise latenight visit from the Butchers Boy. Knowing she keeps track of the Mafia, he asks her whom his attackers worked for, offering information that will help her crack an unsolved murder in return. So begins a new assault on organized crime and an uneasy alliance between opposite sides of the law. As the Butchers Boy works his way ever closer to his quarry in an effort to protect his new way of life, Waring is in a race against time, either to convince him to become a protected informantor to take him out of commission for good.

About the Author

Scott Turow is a writer and attorney. He is the author of seven best-selling novels: Presumed Innocent (1987), The Burden of Proof (1990), Pleading Guilty (1993), The Laws of Our Fathers (1996), Personal Injuries (1999), Reversible Errors (2002), and Ordinary Heroes (2005). A novella, Limitations, was published as a paperback original in November 2006 by Picador following its serialization in The New York Times Magazine. His works of non-fiction include One L (1977), about his experience as a law student, and Ultimate Punishment (2003), a reflection on the death penalty. He frequently contributes essays and op-ed pieces to publications such as the New York Times, Washington Post, Vanity Fair, The New Yorker, Playboy, and The Atlantic. Mr. Turow's books have won a number of literary awards, including the Heartland Prize in 2003 for Reversible Errors, the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award in 2004 for Ultimate Punishment, and Time Magazine's Best Work of Fiction, 1999 for Personal Injuries. His books have been translated into more than 25 languages, sold more than 25 million copies worldwide, and have been adapted into one full-length film and two television mini-series.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 3 comments:

GRETCHEN ADAMEK, March 17, 2011 (view all comments by GRETCHEN ADAMEK)
I find myself compelled to comment on this book after seeing the review by Lissa pop up in the daily dose, and then reading the other reviews.

I could MAYBE agree that this was a taut psychological and legal thriller if this was a stand alone book. But it's not. It's a sequel. "Presumed Innocent" ended with a legal triumph and Rusty's personal despair. Rusty had had an affair, his wife deliberately and brutally murdered his mistress, and meticulously framed him.

Flash forward twenty years to this book--and I am giving nothing away that isn't apparent very early on--and Rusty is living with and still married to his wife. The details of the why and how are unsatisfactory; and the basis for the second murder investigation is consequently contrived.

The only redeeming quality to this book is the skilled writing. Turow sets a breakneck pace, and at the same time a dark melancholy mood.

Those who read and rooted for Rusty in Presumed Innocent as I did, will, I suspect, have no doubt as to Rusty's innocence here. It's just I don't care. For god's sake, I was rooting for Tommy Molto!
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
Lissa, March 13, 2011 (view all comments by Lissa)
Turow presents the story from the different perspective of most of the characters, drawing out the suspense. Like watching a suspense movie, I wanted to call out to the characters to warn them. Intriguing and difficult to put down, even tho the characters are every day people with their own strengths and vulnerabilities. A great read. Will make a good movie.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
Dr. Rico, June 8, 2010 (view all comments by Dr. Rico)
In Turow's latest novel, as in all his novels, he explores people and their relationships and the ways that the law parallels, and affects, these relationships. This gives Turow's novels a depth beyond the run-of-the-mill courtroom thriller. And yet that doesn't prevent "Innocent" from being a crackerjack page-turner. The reader is hooked on discovering which clues are red herrings and which are real -- and what is the meaning of each real clue. Did Rusty really do it, and what is he hiding? Turow handles the shift of perspective among the main characters fairly well, although I admit that one (and only one) character is presented in the third person, and that took some getting used to. But that's a small flaw in a hugely enjoyable book, Turow's best novel in years.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(9 of 29 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 3 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780446562423
Author:
Turow, Scott
Publisher:
Grand Central Publishing
Author:
Perry, Thomas
Author:
Herrmann, Edward
Subject:
Legal
Subject:
Mystery & Detective - General
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
Thrillers
Subject:
Widowers; Husbands and wives; Suspicious deaths; False accusations; Lawyers; Judges; Love affairs; Search for truth
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Mass market paperback
Publication Date:
May 4, 2010
Binding:
Hardback
Language:
English
Pages:
416
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Other books you might like

  1. The Girl Who Played with Fire (Vintage)
    Used Trade Paper $5.95
  2. A Plague of Secrets Used Mass Market $3.95
  3. Solar
    Used Hardcover $4.95

Related Subjects


Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Mystery » A to Z

Innocent Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$7.95 In Stock
Product details 416 pages Grand Central Publishing - English 9780446562423 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Mesmerizing prose and intricate plotting lift Turow's superlative legal thriller, his best novel since his bestselling debut, Presumed Innocent, to which this is a sequel. In 2008, 22 years after the events of the earlier book, former lawyer Rusty Sabich, now a Kindle County, Ill., chief appellate judge, is again suspected of murdering a woman close to him. His wife, Barbara, has died in her bed of what appear to be natural causes, yet Rusty comes under scrutiny from his old nemesis, acting prosecuting attorney Tommy Molto, who unsuccessfully prosecuted him for killing his mistress decades earlier. Tommy's chief deputy, Jim Brand, is suspicious because Rusty chose to keep Barbara's death a secret, even from their son, Nat, for almost an entire day, which could have allowed traces of poison to disappear. Rusty's candidacy for a higher court in an imminent election; his recent clandestine affair with his attractive law clerk, Anna Vostic; and a breach of judicial ethics complicate matters further. Once again, Turow displays an uncanny ability for making the passions and contradictions of his main characters accessible and understandable." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review A Day" by , "What distinguishes Turow's work from boilerplate thrillers is his skill as a writer. Not only does he make the legal developments spellbinding — giving us just enough terminology and procedure to follow along, without cramming the information down our throats — but he makes the characters comes alive just as vividly. They often behave badly and make questionable choices (who doesn't?), and those actions are always believable and strike a note of truth that is sometimes lacking in popular fiction." (Read the entire Powells.com review)
"Review" by , "Scott Turow's new novel is the dedicated fiction-reader's version of El Dorado: a driving, unputdownable courtroom drama/murder mystery that is also a literary treasure, written in language that sparkles with clarity and resonates with honest character insight. I came away feeling amazed and fulfilled, as we only do when we read novelists at the height of their powers. Put this one on your don't-miss list."
"Review" by , "[A] fast and absorbing ride....Rusty's second trial — which takes up the better half of this novel — proves to be just as suspenseful and gripping as his first."
"Review" by , "This is a beautifully written book with finely drawn characters and an intricate plot seamlessly weaving a troubled family story with a murder. Drawing the reader in and not letting go until the last page, Turow's legal thriller is a most worthy successor to Presumed Innocent and perhaps the author's finest work to date."
"Review" by , "There are enough surprises in all this to keep the reader's attention fixed — Turow has always been very good at that — but as usual in his fiction there's more than skillful legal drama....All of which makes for an intelligent, thoughtful novel: a grownup book for grownup readers."
"Review" by , "After reading Innocent...I had an urge to turn back to page one and start over to see where the clues and feints were. It's that good.... The plot twists are augmented by canny observations and richly captured personalities."
"Review" by , "Innocent is a meticulously constructed and superbly paced mystery, full of twists and surprises and the sort of technical arcana on which the genre thrives....This is a lovely novel, gripping and darkly self-reflective."
"Review" by , "Though Innocent is a richer read for those who have read Presumed Innocent, it stands alone with ease....Adding that internal conflict to ambition, sorrow, and righteousness — with murder, adultery and careers at stake — makes for an easy summary judgment: Innocent is anything but a guilty pleasure, it's prime popular fiction."
"Synopsis" by , In Thomas Perrys Edgar-winning debut The Butchers Boy, a professional killer betrayed by the Mafia leaves countless mobsters dead and then disappears. Justice Department official Elizabeth Waring is the only one who believes he ever existed. Many years later, the Butchers Boy finds his peaceful life threatened when a Mafia hit team finally catches up with him. He knows they wont stop coming and decides to take the fight to their door. 

Soon Waring, now high up in the Organized Crime Division of the Justice Department, receives a surprise latenight visit from the Butchers Boy. Knowing she keeps track of the Mafia, he asks her whom his attackers worked for, offering information that will help her crack an unsolved murder in return. So begins a new assault on organized crime and an uneasy alliance between opposite sides of the law. As the Butchers Boy works his way ever closer to his quarry in an effort to protect his new way of life, Waring is in a race against time, either to convince him to become a protected informantor to take him out of commission for good.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.