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I Feel Good: A Memoir of a Life of Soul

I Feel Good: A Memoir of a Life of Soul Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

From his humble roots, to his tremendous career, to the man he is today — the musical icon tells his story.

James Brown has always been a fascinating, controversial figure. From his humble childhood in Georgia, he went on to change the face of American music with hit after hit on the R&B charts. And while he was a courageous public figure in a time of national strife and adversity, his personal life took many destructive turns, leaving a long and difficult path of redemption ahead of him. For the first time in well over a decade, he speaks candidly and at length about his tumultuous, incredible journey.

James Brown moves beyond his music and his much-publicized legal troubles to delve deeply into the highs and lows of his life.

Review:

"'Others may have followed in my wake, but I was the one who turned racist minstrelsy into Black soul — and by doing so, became a cultural force.' So claims Brown in the opening pages of his garrulous, vernacular memoir written with the aid of Eliot (author of bios on the Eagles and Bruce Springsteen). And Brown makes a convincing argument, tracing his gutsy transformation from dirt-poor grade school dropout to gospel singer, legendary showman and musical innovator who broke the color barrier of 1950s and '60s pop by melding African-American rhythm and blues with gospel and rock to become the Godfather of Soul. Along with fascinating details about life in the music industry, Brown relates how soul music, which begins on the upbeat (traditional blues began on the downbeat) was a 'statement of race, of force, of stature, of stride' and 'the perfect marching music for the civil rights era.' The 'rock-a-soul' that Brown created (along with rockers Elvis Presley, Little Richard, Chuck Berry and others) 'was not just about rebellion — it was the rebellion itself,' he says. Chronicling such peace-seeking yet controversial events as his 1968 U.S.O. tour of Vietnam and his landmark Boston Garden performance the day after Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination, Brown cites his own example as a 'self-made and therefore self-owned Black man.' Though he sometimes attributes his legal, financial and political woes to a racist establishment too eager to judge a black man before his day in court, Brown remains a deeply positive force dedicated to the 'international language of music.' This is a fascinating memoir of a trailblazer in music and civil rights. Agent, Mel Berger. (Jan.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"While the narrative is chronological, each chapter finds Brown exploring various tangents, which gives the work a conversational feel that is true to its narrator." Library Journal

Review:

"Brown's tale is a sometimes frustrating, sometimes fascinating testament to the importance of music in American life." The Washington Post

Synopsis:

From his humble Georgia roots to his chart-topping soul and R&B, here's an intimate and poignant look back at the life, triumphs, and tribulations of James Brown, the undisputable Godfather of Soul.

About the Author

Soul Brother Number One, the Godfather of Soul, the Hardest Working Man in Show Business, Mr. Dynamite — all of these titles describe just one man. James Brown is arguably the most influential African-American in popular music in the past half-century and one of the most dynamic, exhilarating performers of our time. Brown is the recipient of the American Music Awards Award of Merit, a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, and the Lifetime Achievement Award of the National Association of Black Owned Broadcasters. When the music industry decided to create a Rock 'n' Roll Hall of Fame, Brown was one of the first 10 musicians inducted.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780451213938
Subtitle:
A Memoir of a Life of Soul
Publisher:
NAL Hardcover
Author:
Eliot, Marc
Author:
Brown, James
Subject:
Composers & Musicians - Rhythm & Blues
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
Entertainment & Performing Arts - General
Subject:
Entertainment & Performing Arts
Publication Date:
20050104
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
9.2 x 6.34 x 1 in 1.09 lb

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Soul and Motown

I Feel Good: A Memoir of a Life of Soul
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 272 pages New American Library - English 9780451213938 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "'Others may have followed in my wake, but I was the one who turned racist minstrelsy into Black soul — and by doing so, became a cultural force.' So claims Brown in the opening pages of his garrulous, vernacular memoir written with the aid of Eliot (author of bios on the Eagles and Bruce Springsteen). And Brown makes a convincing argument, tracing his gutsy transformation from dirt-poor grade school dropout to gospel singer, legendary showman and musical innovator who broke the color barrier of 1950s and '60s pop by melding African-American rhythm and blues with gospel and rock to become the Godfather of Soul. Along with fascinating details about life in the music industry, Brown relates how soul music, which begins on the upbeat (traditional blues began on the downbeat) was a 'statement of race, of force, of stature, of stride' and 'the perfect marching music for the civil rights era.' The 'rock-a-soul' that Brown created (along with rockers Elvis Presley, Little Richard, Chuck Berry and others) 'was not just about rebellion — it was the rebellion itself,' he says. Chronicling such peace-seeking yet controversial events as his 1968 U.S.O. tour of Vietnam and his landmark Boston Garden performance the day after Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination, Brown cites his own example as a 'self-made and therefore self-owned Black man.' Though he sometimes attributes his legal, financial and political woes to a racist establishment too eager to judge a black man before his day in court, Brown remains a deeply positive force dedicated to the 'international language of music.' This is a fascinating memoir of a trailblazer in music and civil rights. Agent, Mel Berger. (Jan.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "While the narrative is chronological, each chapter finds Brown exploring various tangents, which gives the work a conversational feel that is true to its narrator."
"Review" by , "Brown's tale is a sometimes frustrating, sometimes fascinating testament to the importance of music in American life."
"Synopsis" by , From his humble Georgia roots to his chart-topping soul and R&B, here's an intimate and poignant look back at the life, triumphs, and tribulations of James Brown, the undisputable Godfather of Soul.
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