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Andy Warhol and the Can That Sold the World

by

Andy Warhol and the Can That Sold the World Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In the summer of 1962, Andy Warhol unveiled 32 Soup Cans in his first solo exhibition at the Ferus Gallery in Los Angeles—and sent the art world reeling. The responses ran from incredulity to outrage; the poet Taylor Mead described the exhibition as “a brilliant slap in the face to America.” The exhibition put Warhol on the map—and transformed American culture forever. Almost single-handedly, Warhol collapsed the centuries-old distinction between “high” and “low” culture, and created a new and radically modern aesthetic.

In Andy Warhol and the Can that Sold the World, the dazzlingly versatile critic Gary Indiana tells the story of the genesis and impact of this iconic work of art. With energy, wit, and tremendous perspicacity, Indiana recovers the exhilaration and controversy of the Pop Art Revolution and the brilliant, tormented, and profoundly narcissistic figure at its vanguard.

Review:

"The latest from cultural critic and author Indiana (Utopia's Debris) explores the legacy of Andy Warhol through his most famous and, arguably, groundbreaking work, 1962's Campbell's Soup Cans, a group of 32 20'x16' paintings of the ubiquitous red-and-white canned staple. Beginning with a brief look at Warhol's impoverished childhood, Indiana focuses in on the creation and impact of the famed Soup Cans, resulting is an exhaustive report on the Pop Art movement and its relationship to contemporary culture, featuring vibrant commentary on the way a single piece can stand in for an entire oeuvre. Indiana is highly knowledgeable regarding the art world and Warhol's work, and can assume a similarly sophisticated level of understanding in his reader; as such, he will probably leave casual fans behind with dashed-off discussion of the art scene at large. For those already fluent in the man or the movement, Indiana's in-depth look at Soup Cans is a welcome refresher on the power of a single vision not just to make a remarkable career, but to recast the world in a new light." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

After 32 Soup Cans, neither America nor the art world would ever be the same. Gary Indiana offers a witty and opinionated biography of a momentous work of art-and its deeply troubled creator

Synopsis:

A witty and opinionated biography of a momentous work of art—and its deeply troubled creator

About the Author

Gary Indiana—novelist, playwright, actor, art critic, film historian—is one of the most supple and imaginative figures in contemporary American culture. He is the author of numerous plays, novels, and works of nonfiction, including Horse Crazy, Rent Boy, and Utopias Debris. Formerly the chief art critic for the Village Voice, Indiana has also written for the Los Angeles Times Book Review, New York magazine, Artforum, and the London Review of Books. He lives in New York City.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780465002337
Author:
Indiana, Gary
Publisher:
Basic Books (AZ)
Subject:
Criticism
Subject:
General
Subject:
General Social Science
Subject:
Artists, Architects, Photographers
Subject:
Criticism -- Theory.
Subject:
Warhol, Andy
Subject:
Warhol, Andy - Criticism and interpretation
Subject:
Pop art -- United States.
Subject:
Art-Theory and Criticism
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
20100231
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
192
Dimensions:
8.30x5.60x.90 in. .70 lbs.

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Art » Artists
Arts and Entertainment » Art » General
Arts and Entertainment » Art » History and Criticism
Arts and Entertainment » Art » Theory and Criticism
Biography » Artists, Architects, and Photographers
Children's » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » General

Andy Warhol and the Can That Sold the World Used Hardcover
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Product details 192 pages Basic Books - English 9780465002337 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "The latest from cultural critic and author Indiana (Utopia's Debris) explores the legacy of Andy Warhol through his most famous and, arguably, groundbreaking work, 1962's Campbell's Soup Cans, a group of 32 20'x16' paintings of the ubiquitous red-and-white canned staple. Beginning with a brief look at Warhol's impoverished childhood, Indiana focuses in on the creation and impact of the famed Soup Cans, resulting is an exhaustive report on the Pop Art movement and its relationship to contemporary culture, featuring vibrant commentary on the way a single piece can stand in for an entire oeuvre. Indiana is highly knowledgeable regarding the art world and Warhol's work, and can assume a similarly sophisticated level of understanding in his reader; as such, he will probably leave casual fans behind with dashed-off discussion of the art scene at large. For those already fluent in the man or the movement, Indiana's in-depth look at Soup Cans is a welcome refresher on the power of a single vision not just to make a remarkable career, but to recast the world in a new light." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by ,
After 32 Soup Cans, neither America nor the art world would ever be the same. Gary Indiana offers a witty and opinionated biography of a momentous work of art-and its deeply troubled creator
"Synopsis" by ,
A witty and opinionated biography of a momentous work of art—and its deeply troubled creator
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