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3 Burnside US History- Jefferson, Thomas

Jefferson's Secrets: Death and Desire at Monticello

by

Jefferson's Secrets: Death and Desire at Monticello Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Thomas Jefferson died on July 4, 1826, leaving behind a series of mysteries that captured the imaginations of historical investigators-an interest rekindled by the recent revelation that he fathered a child by Sally Hemmings, a woman he legally owned-yet there is still surprisingly little known about him as a man. In Jefferson's Secrets Andrew Burstein focuses on Jefferson's last days to create an emotionally powerful portrait of the uncensored private citizen who was also a giant of a man. Drawing on sources previous biographers have glossed over or missed entirely, Burstein uncovers, first and foremost, how Jefferson confronted his own mortality; and in doing so, he reveals how he viewed his sexual choices. Delving into Jefferson's soul, Burstein lays bare the president's thoughts about his own legacy, his predictions for American democracy, and his feelings regarding women and religion. The result is a moving and surprising work of history that sets a new standard, post-DNA, for the next generation's reassessment of the most evocative and provocative of this country's founders.

Review:

"Perhaps more than any other founding father, the author of the Declaration of Independence has been judged harshly by posterity for being a slaveholder and having a slave concubine. How did Jefferson assess himself at his life's end? Drawing on Jefferson's postpresidential papers, which Burstein says have been little studied, the University of Tulsa history professor (The Passion of Andrew Jackson, etc.) sheds new light on our most enigmatic and interesting founding father from a unique perspective. He presents a vivid portrait of Thomas Jefferson as an old man looking back on life, preparing for death and dwelling on both his successes and his sins.During Jefferson's dotage, as his finances collapsed around him, the old patriot had to confront not only the results of his lifelong fiscal excesses but also the fruits of other excesses. In his last years, Jefferson 'permitted' two of his four children by the black slave Sally Hemings — both of whom could pass for white — to 'run away.' In his will he freed the remaining two, Madison and Eston Hemings, while at the same time making a request (granted) that the Virginia legislature permit them to remain in the state after emancipation — something not normally done. Jefferson had once written that '[t]he only exact testimony of a man is his actions.' In his final years, he tangled with the philosophical and religious implications of his life as a holder of slaves and master of a slave concubine. In some moods, Jefferson hoped for God and an afterlife. In others, perhaps dreading what the Almighty might have to say to him, he described human existence as a brief space 'between two darknesses.'This splendid book shows old Jefferson standing at the precipice, taking stock and perhaps judging himself more harshly than any God might. This is a deeply moving portrait of the aged Jefferson's body, mind and spirit that takes the measure, as Burstein says, of the full range of the founder's imagination. Illus. not seen by PW. Agent, Geri Thoma. (Feb.) hope to exhausted strivers." Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

In this moving and intimate look at the final days of our most enigmatic president, Andrew Burstein sheds new light on what Thomas Jefferson actually thought about sexuality, race, gender, and politics.

Synopsis:

Delving into Jefferson's soul, Burstein lays bare the president's thoughts about his own legacy, his predictions for American democracy, and his feelings regarding women and religion.

About the Author

Andrew Burstein, a native New Yorker, is the Mary Frances Barnard Professor of 19th-Century U.S. History at the University of Tulsa. He is the author of six books on early America, including The Passions of Andrew Jackson and Jeffersons Secrets: Death and Desire at Monticello. Burstein lives in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780465008124
Subtitle:
Death and Desire at Monticello
Author:
Burstein, Andrew
Publisher:
Basic Books
Subject:
Historical - U.S.
Subject:
United states
Subject:
Presidents
Subject:
United States - Antebellum Era
Subject:
Presidents & Heads of State
Subject:
United States - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
20050117
Binding:
Hardback
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
368
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.13 in 23.00 oz

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » US History » Presidents » Jefferson, Thomas

Jefferson's Secrets: Death and Desire at Monticello Used Hardcover
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Product details 368 pages Basic Books - English 9780465008124 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Perhaps more than any other founding father, the author of the Declaration of Independence has been judged harshly by posterity for being a slaveholder and having a slave concubine. How did Jefferson assess himself at his life's end? Drawing on Jefferson's postpresidential papers, which Burstein says have been little studied, the University of Tulsa history professor (The Passion of Andrew Jackson, etc.) sheds new light on our most enigmatic and interesting founding father from a unique perspective. He presents a vivid portrait of Thomas Jefferson as an old man looking back on life, preparing for death and dwelling on both his successes and his sins.During Jefferson's dotage, as his finances collapsed around him, the old patriot had to confront not only the results of his lifelong fiscal excesses but also the fruits of other excesses. In his last years, Jefferson 'permitted' two of his four children by the black slave Sally Hemings — both of whom could pass for white — to 'run away.' In his will he freed the remaining two, Madison and Eston Hemings, while at the same time making a request (granted) that the Virginia legislature permit them to remain in the state after emancipation — something not normally done. Jefferson had once written that '[t]he only exact testimony of a man is his actions.' In his final years, he tangled with the philosophical and religious implications of his life as a holder of slaves and master of a slave concubine. In some moods, Jefferson hoped for God and an afterlife. In others, perhaps dreading what the Almighty might have to say to him, he described human existence as a brief space 'between two darknesses.'This splendid book shows old Jefferson standing at the precipice, taking stock and perhaps judging himself more harshly than any God might. This is a deeply moving portrait of the aged Jefferson's body, mind and spirit that takes the measure, as Burstein says, of the full range of the founder's imagination. Illus. not seen by PW. Agent, Geri Thoma. (Feb.) hope to exhausted strivers." Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by ,
In this moving and intimate look at the final days of our most enigmatic president, Andrew Burstein sheds new light on what Thomas Jefferson actually thought about sexuality, race, gender, and politics.

"Synopsis" by , Delving into Jefferson's soul, Burstein lays bare the president's thoughts about his own legacy, his predictions for American democracy, and his feelings regarding women and religion.
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