No Words Wasted Sale
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Visit our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Original Essays | January 12, 2015

    Christopher Scotton: IMG Five Hundred Mountains Destroyed for a @*&%$! Allegory!



    I found a hole in the perimeter fence on a Sunday when the haul trucks were idle and I could work my way up the shoulder of mountain undetected.... Continue »
    1. $18.20 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

      The Secret Wisdom of the Earth

      Chris Scotton 9781455551927

    spacer

This item may be
out of stock.

Click on the button below to search for this title in other formats.


Check for Availability
Add to Wishlist

The Happiness Hypothesis: Finding Modern Truth in Ancient Wisdom

The Happiness Hypothesis: Finding Modern Truth in Ancient Wisdom Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

An award-winning psychologist exposes traditional wisdom to the scrutiny of science to show why ancient insights still help us live more meaningful — and healthy — lives Your grandmother was smarter than you knew. In fact, grandmothers and other sages, in cultures all over the world, have handed down bits of wisdom that ring true in every language: Do unto others as you would have others do unto you; what doesn't kill you makes you stronger; and life itself is what you make of it all exist as folkloric wisdom, crossing religious, historical, and social boundaries. Now, an esteemed psychologist puts these maxims under the microscope and reveals just how true these Truths are — and why.

Jonathan Haidt skillfully combines two genres — philosophical wisdom and scientific research — delighting the reader with surprising insights. He explains, for example, why virtue is often not its own reward, why extroverts really are happier than introverts, why conscious thinking is not nearly as important as we think it is, and why even confirmed atheists experience spiritual elevation. In a stunning final chapter, Haidt addresses the grand question "How can I live a meaningful life?," offering an original answer that draws on the rich inspiration of both philosophy and science.

Review:

Starred Review. The spirit is willing but the flesh is weak, lamented St. Paul, and this engrossing scientific interpretation of traditional lore backs him up with hard data. Citing Plato, Buddha and modern brain science, psychologist Haidt notes the mind is like an "elephant" of automatic desires and impulses atop which conscious intention is an ineffectual "rider." Haidt sifts Eastern and Western religious and philosophical traditions for other nuggets of wisdom to substantiate?and sometimes critique?with the findings of neurology and cognitive psychology. The Buddhist-Stoic injunction to cast off worldly attachments in pursuit of happiness, for example, is backed up by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi's studies into pleasure. And Nietzsche's contention that what doesn't kill us makes us stronger is considered against research into post-traumatic growth. An exponent of the "positive psychology" movement, Haidt also offers practical advice on finding happiness and meaning. Riches don't matter much, he observes, but close relationships, quiet surroundings and short commutes help a lot, while meditation, cognitive psychotherapy and Prozac are equally valid remedies for constitutional unhappiness. Haidt sometimes seems reductionist, but his is an erudite, fluently written, stimulating reassessment of age-old issues. (Jan.) Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review:

"Balancing ancient wisdom and modern science, Haidt consults great minds of the past, from Buddha to Lao Tzu and from Plato to Freud, as well as some not-so-greats: even Dr. Phil is mentioned. Fascinating stuff, accessibly expressed." June Sawyers, Booklist

Synopsis:

An award-winning psychologist skillfully combines two genres-philosophical wisdom and scientific research-delighting the reader with surprising insights

Synopsis:

An award-winning psychologist examines the worlds philosophical wisdom through the lens of psychological science

Synopsis:

Happiness and the law. At first glance, these two concepts seem to have little to do with each another. To some, they may even seem diametrically opposed. Yet one of the things the law strives for is to improve peopleand#8217;s quality of life. To do this, it must first predict what will make people happy. Yet happiness research shows that, time and time again, people err in predicting what will make them happy, overestimating the import of money and mistaking the circumstances to which they can and cannot adapt.and#160;and#160;

Drawing on new research in psychology, neuroscience, and economics, the authors of Happiness and the Law assess how the law affects peopleand#8217;s quality of lifeand#151;and how it can do so in a better way. Taking readers through some of the common questions about and objections to the use of happiness research in law and policy, they consider two areas in depth: criminal punishment and civil lawsuits. More broadly, the book proposes a comprehensive approach to assessing human welfareand#151;well-being analysisand#151;that is a valuable alternative to the strictly economically based cost-benefit analyses currently dominating how we evaluate public policy. The study of happiness is the next step in the evolution from traditional economic analysis of the law to a behavioral approach. Happiness and the Law will serve as the definitive, yet accessible, guide to understanding this new paradigm.

Synopsis:

In his widely praised book, award-winning psychologist Jonathan Haidt examines the worlds philosophical wisdom through the lens of psychological science, showing how a deeper understanding of enduring maxims-like Do unto others as you would have others do unto you, or What doesnt kill you makes you stronger-can enrich and even transform our lives.

About the Author

Jonathan Haidt is an associate professor of psychology at the University of Virginia. His research has centered on morality and the moral emotions, particularly elevation and awe. He is the co-editor of Flourishing: Positive Psychology and the Life Well-Lived. He lives in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Introduction: What Happiness Has to Do with the Law

PART I.and#160;and#160;and#160; Analyzing Lawsand#8217; Effects on Well-Being

CHAPTER 1.and#160;and#160;and#160; Measuring Happiness

CHAPTER 2.and#160;and#160;and#160; Well-Being Analysis

CHAPTER 3.and#160;and#160;and#160; Well-Being Analysis vs. Cost-Benefit Analysis

PART II.and#160;and#160;and#160; Viewing Two Core Areas of the Law through the Lens of Hedonics

CHAPTER 4.and#160;and#160;and#160; Happiness and Punishment

CHAPTER 5.and#160;and#160;and#160; Adaptation, Affective Forecasting, and Civil Litigation

PART III.and#160;and#160;and#160; Well-Being

CHAPTER 6and#160;and#160;and#160; Some Problems with Preference Theories and Objective Theories

CHAPTER 7and#160;and#160;and#160; A Hedonic Theory of Well-Being

CHAPTER 8and#160;and#160;and#160; Addressing Objections to the Hedonic Theory

Conclusion: The Future of Happiness and the Law

Notes

Bibliography

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780465028016
Publisher:
University Of Chicago Press
Subject:
Happiness
Author:
Haidt, Jonathan
Author:
Buccafusco, Christopher
Author:
Masur, Jonathan S.
Author:
Bronsteen, John
Subject:
Personal Growth - Happiness
Subject:
General Psychology & Psychiatry
Subject:
General Law
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Publication Date:
20141229
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
from 9
Language:
English
Illustrations:
1 line drawing, 4 tables
Pages:
280
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in
Age Level:
from 18

Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Psychology » General

The Happiness Hypothesis: Finding Modern Truth in Ancient Wisdom
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 280 pages Basic Books - English 9780465028016 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , Starred Review. The spirit is willing but the flesh is weak, lamented St. Paul, and this engrossing scientific interpretation of traditional lore backs him up with hard data. Citing Plato, Buddha and modern brain science, psychologist Haidt notes the mind is like an "elephant" of automatic desires and impulses atop which conscious intention is an ineffectual "rider." Haidt sifts Eastern and Western religious and philosophical traditions for other nuggets of wisdom to substantiate?and sometimes critique?with the findings of neurology and cognitive psychology. The Buddhist-Stoic injunction to cast off worldly attachments in pursuit of happiness, for example, is backed up by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi's studies into pleasure. And Nietzsche's contention that what doesn't kill us makes us stronger is considered against research into post-traumatic growth. An exponent of the "positive psychology" movement, Haidt also offers practical advice on finding happiness and meaning. Riches don't matter much, he observes, but close relationships, quiet surroundings and short commutes help a lot, while meditation, cognitive psychotherapy and Prozac are equally valid remedies for constitutional unhappiness. Haidt sometimes seems reductionist, but his is an erudite, fluently written, stimulating reassessment of age-old issues. (Jan.) Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
"Review" by , "Balancing ancient wisdom and modern science, Haidt consults great minds of the past, from Buddha to Lao Tzu and from Plato to Freud, as well as some not-so-greats: even Dr. Phil is mentioned. Fascinating stuff, accessibly expressed."
"Synopsis" by ,
An award-winning psychologist skillfully combines two genres-philosophical wisdom and scientific research-delighting the reader with surprising insights
"Synopsis" by ,
An award-winning psychologist examines the worlds philosophical wisdom through the lens of psychological science
"Synopsis" by ,
Happiness and the law. At first glance, these two concepts seem to have little to do with each another. To some, they may even seem diametrically opposed. Yet one of the things the law strives for is to improve peopleand#8217;s quality of life. To do this, it must first predict what will make people happy. Yet happiness research shows that, time and time again, people err in predicting what will make them happy, overestimating the import of money and mistaking the circumstances to which they can and cannot adapt.and#160;and#160;

Drawing on new research in psychology, neuroscience, and economics, the authors of Happiness and the Law assess how the law affects peopleand#8217;s quality of lifeand#151;and how it can do so in a better way. Taking readers through some of the common questions about and objections to the use of happiness research in law and policy, they consider two areas in depth: criminal punishment and civil lawsuits. More broadly, the book proposes a comprehensive approach to assessing human welfareand#151;well-being analysisand#151;that is a valuable alternative to the strictly economically based cost-benefit analyses currently dominating how we evaluate public policy. The study of happiness is the next step in the evolution from traditional economic analysis of the law to a behavioral approach. Happiness and the Law will serve as the definitive, yet accessible, guide to understanding this new paradigm.

"Synopsis" by ,
In his widely praised book, award-winning psychologist Jonathan Haidt examines the worlds philosophical wisdom through the lens of psychological science, showing how a deeper understanding of enduring maxims-like Do unto others as you would have others do unto you, or What doesnt kill you makes you stronger-can enrich and even transform our lives.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.