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Lucky Planet: Why Earth Is Exceptional--And What That Means for Life in the Universe

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Humankind has long fantasized about life elsewhere in the universe. And as we discover countless exoplanets orbiting other stars—among them, rocky super-Earths and gaseous Hot Jupiters—we become ever more hopeful that we may come across extraterrestrial life. Yet even as we become aware of the vast numbers of planets outside our solar system, it has also become clear that Earth is exceptional. The question is: why?

In Lucky Planet, astrobiologist David Waltham argues that Earths climate stability is one of the primary factors that makes it able to support life, and that nothing short of luck made such conditions possible. The four-billion-year stretch of good weather that our planet has experienced is statistically so unlikely, he shows, that chances are slim that we will ever encounter intelligent extraterrestrial others.

Describing the three factors that typically control a planets average temperature—the heat received from its star, how much heat the planet absorbs, and the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere—Waltham paints a complex picture of how special Earths climate really is. He untangles the mystery of why, although these factors have shifted by such massive measures over the history of life on Earth, surface temperatures have never fluctuated so much as to make conditions hostile to life. Citing factors such as the size of our Moon and the effect of an ever-warming Sun, Waltham challenges the prevailing scientific consensus that other Earth-like planets have natural stabilizing mechanisms that allow life to flourish.

A lively exploration of the stars above and the ground beneath our feet, Lucky Planet seamlessly weaves the story of Earth and the worlds orbiting other stars to give us a new perspective of the surprising role chance plays in our place in the universe.

Review:

"Waltham, astrobiologist and geophysicist at the University of London, addresses the pressing question: How common is intelligent life in the universe? He examines the conditions necessary for life to begin and evolve into more complex forms, along the way exploring cosmological matters, such as star and planet formation, geological and meteorological concerns, as well as the nature of life itself. His basic, unsurprising premise is that vast amounts of time are required to produce intelligent life, but he goes further to explain that maintaining a relatively stable planetary climate for the bulk of that time is both essential and rare. 'If this book has a theme, it is that climate is destiny.' Earth, as he shows, has a multiplicity of factors that have yielded a stable climate and, he argues, it is unlikely that a similar combination of conditions will appear very often. There are an enormous number of planets in the universe, but only a small percentage will have the requisite conditions. Waltham's somewhat depressing conclusion is that 'advanced civilizations elsewhere are inevitable, but they will also be so far away that we will never be able to communicate with them or even observe influences they may have on their galactic neighborhoods.'" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

Why Earths life-friendly climate makes it exceptional—and what that means for the likelihood of finding intelligent extraterrestrial life

We have long fantasized about finding life on planets other than our own. Yet even as we become aware of the vast expanses beyond our solar system, it remains clear that Earth is exceptional. The question is: why? In Lucky Planet, astrobiologist David Waltham argues that Earths climate stability is what makes it able to support life, and it is nothing short of luck that made such conditions possible. The four billion year-stretch of good weather that our planet has experienced is statistically so unlikely that chances are slim that we will ever encounter intelligent extraterrestrial others. Citing the factors that typically control a planets average temperature—including the size of its moon, as well as the rate of the Universes expansion—Waltham challenges the prevailing scientific consensus that Earth-like planets have natural stabilizing mechanisms that allow life to flourish.

A lively exploration of the stars above and the ground beneath our feet, Lucky Planet seamlessly weaves the story of Earth and the worlds orbiting other stars to give us a new perspective of the surprising role chance plays in our place in the universe.

Synopsis:

Why Earths life-sustaining climate stability makes it exceptional—and what that means for the likelihood of finding intelligent extraterrestrial life

About the Author

David Waltham is an astrobiologist, geophysicist and head of the department of Earth Sciences at Royal Holloway College, the University of London. He is a Fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society as well as the Geological Society, a member of the American Geophysical Union, and treasurer of the Astrobiology Society of Britain. Walthams research has resulted in fifty peer-reviewed scientific articles in geological, geophysical and astronomical journals. More recently, Waltham has published five scientific papers on the topics covered in Lucky Planet and organized and ran a heavily-attended Royal Astronomical Society meeting entitled “Is the Earth Special?”

Product Details

ISBN:
9780465039999
Author:
Waltham, David
Publisher:
Basic Books a Member of Perseus Books Group
Subject:
Astronomy
Subject:
Astronomy - General
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
20140431
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from 13
Language:
English
Pages:
208
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.13 in

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Related Subjects


Science and Mathematics » Astronomy » Extraterrestrial
Science and Mathematics » Astronomy » General
Science and Mathematics » Biology » General
Science and Mathematics » Physics » Meteorology

Lucky Planet: Why Earth Is Exceptional--And What That Means for Life in the Universe Used Hardcover
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$18.50 In Stock
Product details 208 pages Basic Books a Member of Perseus Books Group - English 9780465039999 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Waltham, astrobiologist and geophysicist at the University of London, addresses the pressing question: How common is intelligent life in the universe? He examines the conditions necessary for life to begin and evolve into more complex forms, along the way exploring cosmological matters, such as star and planet formation, geological and meteorological concerns, as well as the nature of life itself. His basic, unsurprising premise is that vast amounts of time are required to produce intelligent life, but he goes further to explain that maintaining a relatively stable planetary climate for the bulk of that time is both essential and rare. 'If this book has a theme, it is that climate is destiny.' Earth, as he shows, has a multiplicity of factors that have yielded a stable climate and, he argues, it is unlikely that a similar combination of conditions will appear very often. There are an enormous number of planets in the universe, but only a small percentage will have the requisite conditions. Waltham's somewhat depressing conclusion is that 'advanced civilizations elsewhere are inevitable, but they will also be so far away that we will never be able to communicate with them or even observe influences they may have on their galactic neighborhoods.'" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,
Why Earths life-friendly climate makes it exceptional—and what that means for the likelihood of finding intelligent extraterrestrial life

We have long fantasized about finding life on planets other than our own. Yet even as we become aware of the vast expanses beyond our solar system, it remains clear that Earth is exceptional. The question is: why? In Lucky Planet, astrobiologist David Waltham argues that Earths climate stability is what makes it able to support life, and it is nothing short of luck that made such conditions possible. The four billion year-stretch of good weather that our planet has experienced is statistically so unlikely that chances are slim that we will ever encounter intelligent extraterrestrial others. Citing the factors that typically control a planets average temperature—including the size of its moon, as well as the rate of the Universes expansion—Waltham challenges the prevailing scientific consensus that Earth-like planets have natural stabilizing mechanisms that allow life to flourish.

A lively exploration of the stars above and the ground beneath our feet, Lucky Planet seamlessly weaves the story of Earth and the worlds orbiting other stars to give us a new perspective of the surprising role chance plays in our place in the universe.

"Synopsis" by ,
Why Earths life-sustaining climate stability makes it exceptional—and what that means for the likelihood of finding intelligent extraterrestrial life
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