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The Medieval Village

by

The Medieval Village Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Renowned medievalist offers exceptionally detailed, comprehensive and vivid picture of medieval peasant life, including nature of serfdom, manorial customs, village discipline, peasant revolts, the Black Death, justice, tithing, games and dance, much more. Much on exploitation of peasant classes. "...a remarkable book..." — Times (London) Literary Supplement.

Synopsis:

Exceptionally well-documented vivid study of serfdom, manorial customs, abbeys, village discipline, peasant revolts, justice, religious education, tithing, much more. Illustrated. "...a remarkable book..."—Times (London) Literary Supplement.

Synopsis:

Renowned medievalist offers exceptionally detailed, comprehensive and vivid picture of medieval peasant life, including nature of serfdom, manorial customs, village discipline, peasant revolts, the Black Death, justice, tithing, games and dance, much more. Much on exploitation of peasant classes. "...a remarkable book..."—Times (London) Literary Supplement.

Table of Contents

CHAPTER I. THE OPEN ROAD

  The workman's lot as seen by the workman

  Necessity of scientific study of medieval society

  The rural glory and the rural gloom

CHAPTER II. VILLAGE DEVELOPMENT

  Beginnings of serfdom

  The fully-developed serf

  Sales of serfs

  And of their brood

  Modern and medieval testimony to servile misery

CHAPTER III. A FEW CROSS-LIGHTS

  Janssen's untrustworthy counterpleas

  Rough indulgences for the serf

  Scot-ales

  Power of money in the Middle Ages

  The lawyer-class and the serf

CHAPTER IV. A GALSTONBURY MANOR

  Wealth of medieval abbeys

  Manorial customs

  The peasant's holding

  Minute subdivision

  Consequent confusion

CHAPTER V. THE SPORTING CHANCE

  Uncertainty of measures

  "Natural measures"

  Sporting chances

  Corporal chastisement

  "Compulsory "gifts"

CHAPTER VI. BANS AND MONOPOLIES

  Manorial monopolies: mill

  Oven

  Wine-ban

  Evasions of justice

  Tithes

  Uncertainty of status

CHAPTER VII. THE MANOR COURT

  The village self-sufficing

  The lord's court

  Its proceedings

  The lord's mill

  "Beating the bounds"

CHAPTER VIII. LIFE ON A MONASTIC MANOR

  "The "heriot" system"

  Manorial dovecotes

  Rabbits

  "The serf "buys his own blood"

  Jus primae noctis

  Breeding in and in

  "Leywite"

  Forced marriages

  The mill again

  Ale-tolls

  Rackrenting

  Village discipline

CHAPTER IX. FATHERLY GOVERNMENT

  Village discipline (continued)

  "Villein" as a term of abuse"

  Games and dance repressed

  The rough side of football

  Other affrays

  A peasant's cottage and effects

  Clothing

  Arcadian simplicity

CHAPTER X. THE LORD'S POWER

  Oppressive lords

  Especially on the Continent

  Worst on lay estates

  Bad even in England

  Wars and plagues

  Game-preserving

  Gradual improvement

  Manorial help for the poor

CHAPTER XI. EARLIER REVOLTS

  Comparative proseperity in England

  Yet far short of modern

  "The main factors, economic"

  Peasant revolts

  Communistic ideas

  "Riots at Dunstable, Burton, and Vale Royal"

  At Meaux

  Froissart's testimony

  The Black Death

  Flights of peasants

  Gradual emancipation

CHAPTER XII. MONKS AND SERFS

  Attempts to represent the Reformation as the main factor in reaction

  "The monk scarcely better, as landlord, than the layman"

  A cardinal and a bishop paint him as even worse

  Monastic conservatism here counterbalance monastic charity

  Emptiness and inaccuracy of Montalembert's arguments

CHAPTER XIII. THE CHANCES OF LIBERATION

  "Gregory the Great as "liberator"

  No medieval philosopher condemns serfdom except Wyclif

  Incomparably more serfs were freed by layfolk than by churchmen

  The serf had nearly always to buy his freedom

  Especially on monastic estates

  And it was under monks that serfdom lingered longest

CHAPTER XIV. LEGAL BARRIERS TO ENFRANCHISEMENT

  "For the churchman was forbidden by canon law to free serfs, except under severe restrictions"

  And the Church actually made fresh slaves

  "And the popes encouraged slavery, especially in sixteenth and seventeenth centuries"

  Nor did the Church even fight against servile injustices in detail

CHAPTER XV. KINDLY CONCESSIONS

  Yet we find kindly concessions a little more frequently on monastic estates

  Especially in cases of pregancy and child-birth

CHAPTER XVI. JUSTICE

  Justice and money in the Middle Ages

  The monks and gallows-rights

  And the trial by battle

  They are always unfriendly to town liberties

  "They exact heavy "tallages"

  And resort to rackrenting

  Do not always allow for holy-days or sickness or weather

  Evict tenants wholesale

  Judgements of Leadam and Hanotaux

CHAPTER XVII. CLEARINGS AND ENCLOSURES

  "Nor did they, except very rarely, set an example of labour"

  They were often sportsmen

  "In their best days, they planned and superintended a great deal of clearing and drainage; but perhaps less, on the whole, than lay lords"

  Evidence from England

  From Italy

  From France

  From Germany

  They enclosed land for parks and sheep-runs

  Balance between lay and monastic landlordism

CHAPTER XVIII. CHURCH ESTIMATES OF THE PEASANT

  "Churchman, here and there, praise the peasant and his lot"

  But medieval egalitarianism was scarcely even skin-deep

  The overwhelming majority of churchmen speak of the peasant with dislike and reprobation

  The extreme rarity of peasant saints

  Barbarous punishments

  Wives lent out by law

  Aucassin and Nicolete

CHAPTER XIX. RELIGIOUS EDUCATION

  Aquinas desiderates an ignorant and mutually distrustful peasantry

  Village ignorance and quarrels

  Vast gap between theory and practice in medieval education

  Work and dance on holy-days

  The peasant ignorant even of the Mass

  Startling ignorance even among the clergy

  Rich absentee clergy

  Poverty of the curates

  Villon and Jeanne d'Arc on village education

  The peasant's irreligion

  Except where he and his clergy agree in superstition

  Excommunication of caterpillars

  Pagan survivals

  Witchcraft

  Holdy-day scandals

  The village inn

  Vendettas

CHAPTER XX. TITHES AND FRICTION

  Paganism of the Dark Ages

  Clergy and capitalism

  Church pews and privilege

  Monastic banking

  Clerical usurers

  Sale of the sacraments

  Consequent unpopularity of the clergy

  Tithe quarrels

  Scene at tithegathering

CHAPTER XXI. TITHES AND FRICTION (CONTINUED)

  Poverty and dependence of lower priesthood

  Parson-squires

  Parishioners assert financial control

  The real poor neglected

  Robbery of parochial tithes by the monasteries

  Two medieval bishops' criticisms of parochial conditions

  Jessopp's verdict

  Lamprecht's

CHAPTER XXII. POVERTY UNADORNED

  The peasant of Saxon times

  His descendant in the thirteenth century

  His food and drink

  A serf's dinner

  His dress

  The rough side of his life

  His sports

CHAPTER XXIII. LABOUR AND CONSIDERATION

  Long hours of work

  Ravage of war

  Famine

  Growth of capitalism and plague of usury

  All men despise the serf

  And he himself feels the moral grievance of his status

  Evidence of cold-blooded business documents

  Sordid conditions of parish life

  Persecution by tax-collectors and royal officers

CHAPTER XXIV. THE REBELLION OF THE POOR

  "As the peasant improves, his discontent grows"

  Medieval society inelastic; growth means revolt

  Preachers and pamphleteers in the later fifteenth century

  Mystic exaltation of the rebels

  "Frequency of revolts, especially in Germany"

  The rebel's claims

  Lord Acton's verdict

CHAPTER XXV. THE REBELLION OF THE POOR (CONTINUED)

  Monastic no less unpopular than lay landlords

  Their conservatism

  The prince-abbot of Kempten

  The great revolt of 1524-5 (Bauernkrieg)

  Social and religious d

  Failure of the revolt

CHAPTER XXVI. THE DISSOLUTION OF THE MONASTERIES

  The Lincolnshire Rising and the Pilgrimage of Grace exceptional in their comparative favour to the monasteries

  Other factors than the Reformation worked against the peasant

  Elizabeth's selfish policy

  Not essentially different from that of Catholic rulers

  Unpopularity of the later monks in Germany

  Evidence from France and England

  Cobbett's false assertions about the Poor-Laws

  Sufferings of the post-Reformation continental peasantry

CHAPTER XXVII. CONCLUSION

  The peasant's progress was fitful and unequal

  "Difficulty, but necessity, of attempting comparisons"

  Let us make a point of starting from verifiable facts

  The peasant was a child compared with the townsman

  Paradise Lost and Paradise Regained

APPENDIXES:

1. The worker's lot

2. The French custom of désaveu

3. Complication of services

4. Interested misstatements

5. Chirstmas at Tynemouth

6. Younger sons

7. Backward tillage

8. Killing of serfs

9. Medieval population

10. The Durham Halmote Rolls

11. Justice and money

12. Heriot and mortuary

13. "Skelton, "Ware the Hauke"

14. Fus primae noctis

15. Notes on marriage

16. Marriage and kinship

17. Leyrwite

18. Gleaning

19. Games

20. Illegal oppressions

21. Freemen reduced to bondage

22. The customs of Darnell and Over

23. Slavery in the Roman Church

24. Records of bondage

25. Manumission and money

26. Lay and ecclesiastical manumissions

27. Incomplete manumissions

28. Gratian's authority

29. Monks and hunting

30. Lay and monastic clearings

31. Peasant civilisation

32. Peasant saints

33. Punishments

34. Sabbatarianism

35. Peasant and priest in Italy

36. Priests and people

37. Janssen on the Peasants' Revolt

38. Natural Law

39. Post-Reformation peasantry

40. Farther corroborative evidence

INDEX

Product Details

ISBN:
9780486260020
Author:
Coulton, G. G.
Publisher:
Dover Publications
Author:
Coulton, G. G.
Location:
New York :
Subject:
History
Subject:
Medieval
Subject:
Continental european
Subject:
Europe - General
Subject:
Social history
Subject:
Sociology, rural
Subject:
Civilization, medieval
Subject:
Villeinage.
Subject:
General History
Subject:
Sociology - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Series Volume:
v. 21
Publication Date:
19890631
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
603
Dimensions:
8.5 x 5.38 in 1.17 lb

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Sociology » General
History and Social Science » Western Civilization » Medieval
History and Social Science » World History » General
History and Social Science » World History » Medieval and Renaissance

The Medieval Village Used Trade Paper
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Product details 603 pages Dover Publications - English 9780486260020 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
Exceptionally well-documented vivid study of serfdom, manorial customs, abbeys, village discipline, peasant revolts, justice, religious education, tithing, much more. Illustrated. "...a remarkable book..."—Times (London) Literary Supplement.

"Synopsis" by ,
Renowned medievalist offers exceptionally detailed, comprehensive and vivid picture of medieval peasant life, including nature of serfdom, manorial customs, village discipline, peasant revolts, the Black Death, justice, tithing, games and dance, much more. Much on exploitation of peasant classes. "...a remarkable book..."—Times (London) Literary Supplement.

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