Murakami Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Interviews | Today, 10:19am

Jill Owens: IMG David Mitchell: The Powells.com Interview



David MitchellDavid Mitchell's newest mind-bending, time-skipping novel may be his most accomplished work yet. Written in six sections, one per decade, The Bone... Continue »
  1. $21.00 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    The Bone Clocks

    David Mitchell 9781400065677

spacer

This item may be
out of stock.

Click on the button below to search for this title in other formats.


Check for Availability
Add to Wishlist

This title in other editions

Our Town: A Heartland Lynching, a Haunted Town, and the Hidden History of White America

by

Our Town: A Heartland Lynching, a Haunted Town, and the Hidden History of White America Cover

ISBN13: 9780517705063
ISBN10: 0517705060
All Product Details

 

Review-A-Day

"Cynthia Carr has written a book not about the subject ostensibly at hand but about herself. Everything is me, me, me....Like too many other journalists writing books these days, Carr is under the impression that how she got her story and how she feels about it are more interesting (and, implicitly, more important) than the story itself. She could not be more wrong." Jonathan Yardley, The Washington Post (read the entire Washington Post review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The brutal lynching of two young black men in Marion, Indiana, on August 7, 1930, cast a shadow over the town that still lingers. It is only one event in the long and complicated history of race relations in Marion, a history much ignored and considered by many to be best forgotten. But the lynching cannot be forgotten. It is too much a part of the fabric of Marion, too much ingrained even now in the minds of those who live there. In Our Town, journalist Cynthia Carr explores the issues of race, loyalty, and memory in America through the lens of a specific hate crime that occurred in Marion but could have happened anywhere.

Marion is our town, America's town, and its legacy is our legacy.

Like everyone in Marion, Carr knew the basic details of the lynching even as a child: three black men were arrested for attempted murder and rape, and two of them were hanged in the courthouse square, a fate the third miraculously escaped. Meeting James Cameron — the man who'd survived — led her to examine how the quiet Midwestern town she loved could harbor such dark secrets. Spurred by the realization that, like her, millions of white Americans are intimately connected to this hidden history, Carr began an investigation into the events of that night, racism in Marion, the presence of the Ku Klux Klan — past and present — in Indiana, and her own grandfather's involvement. She uncovered a pattern of white guilt and indifference, of black anger and fear that are the hallmark of race relations across the country.

In a sweeping narrative that takes her from the angry energy of a white supremacist rally to the peaceful fields of Weaver — once an all-black settlement neighboring Marion — in search of the good and the bad in the story of race in America, Carr returns to her roots to seek out the fascinating people and places that have shaped the town. Her intensely compelling account of the Marion lynching and of her own family's secrets offers a fresh examination of the complex legacy of whiteness in America. Part mystery, part history, part true crime saga, Our Town is a riveting read that lays bare a raw and little-chronicled facet of our national memory and provides a starting point toward reconciliation with the past.

Review:

"Former Village Voice arts writer Carr has crafted a searing look at race in America that combines investigative journalism with an intensely personal family history. She uses the 1930 lynching of two African-American men in Marion, Ind., where her father and grandfather grew up, as a prism to examine not only the psychology of the lynch mob members but the thousands of bystanders, some of whom were immortalized in a revolting and haunting photograph, which shows townspeople gathering to stare at the mutilated corpses, still dangling from their nooses. Carr's discovery that her beloved grandfather belonged to the Ku Klux Klan and may have been involved in the hate crime leads her to return to Marion and ask questions that many on both sides of the racial divide find uncomfortable. Carr's sense that she bears — that we all bear — a burden of guilt allows her an empathy that enables her to gain access to present-day Klan members, who talk freely about their ideology; her refusal to view herself as morally superior to them lends power to her observations, and her lack of self-righteousness is refreshing. This outstanding narrative is an excellent companion to last year's Blood Done Sign My Name and Arc of Justice, which also used a crime as an entry point into the struggle for civil rights. With the Hurricane Katrina catastrophe reviving the debate on the state of race relations in this country, this book will have an extra topicality in addition to its narrative power that should deservedly attract a wide audience." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Carr's Marion, with its family and racial secrets, provides a glimpse at a complex America, not so distant in our past that its ghosts aren't capable of haunting us today." Booklist

Review:

"[M]ost powerfully, [Carr] considers the question of the guilt one feels for deeds done — and not done — by beloved relatives....An exhaustive, courageous examination of racism's horrifying but sometimes very familiar face." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"We need reminders of where we once were, so we don't go back. In bringing these events to the attention of a wider audience, Carr has done an important service." Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Review:

"[A] stunning book....This beautifully written, detail-filled work brings together the historical and personal in a powerful and moving fashion and belongs on the shelves of every U.S. library." Library Journal

Review:

"Unfortunately, [the] intriguing developments too often receive only limited attention in Our Town, making it a less useful, illuminating book than it might have been." San Francisco Chronicle

Review:

"[A] great shaggy beast of a book, far longer than it needed to be....[Carr] gets bogged down in family history unrelated to her themes. Mounds of raw, unassimilated data clog the storytelling." Seattle Times

Review:

"One of the great books written about race in America....Carr's great accomplishment in this courageous, compelling work of reporting and reflection is to show with absolute clarity that bloody trees stood in more than one place in this country." Cleveland Plain Dealer

Synopsis:

Intensely compelling, Our Town is Carr's epic account of a brutal lynching that took place in 1930 in Marion, Indiana, and the town's struggle to forget the events of that terrible night. 8-page photo insert.

Synopsis:

On August 7, 1930, three black teenagers were dragged from their jail cells in Marion, Indiana, and beaten before a howling mob. Two of them were hanged; by fate the third escaped. A photo taken that night shows the bodies hanging from the tree but focuses on the faces in the crowd — some enraged, some laughing, and some subdued, perhaps already feeling the first pangs of regret.

Sixty-three years later, journalist Cynthia Carr began searching the photo for her grandfather's face.

About the Author

Cynthia Carr was for many years an arts writer for The Village Voice, writing as C.Carr. She lives in New York.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Dave King, May 11, 2006 (view all comments by Dave King)
Race is still the most controversial topic in America, so it?s easy to see why this book has touched a few nerves. Still, I?m inclined to agree with the many reviewers who found in Our Town a profound and interesting investigation of our national character. For though this book begins with a lynching, its broader theme is certainly the question of how we live together, how we get along, and whether we still deserve the ?melting pot? label we?re so very proud of. Ultimately, Carr?s conclusion is hopeful, and along the way she delivers a journalistic detective story that?s nothing short of a page turner. Essential reading for anyone interested in the state of America today.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(7 of 12 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780517705063
Subtitle:
A Heartland Lynching, a Haunted Town, and the Hidden History of White America
Publisher:
Crown
Author:
Carr, Cindy
Author:
Carr, C.
Author:
Cynthia Carr
Subject:
General
Subject:
History
Subject:
Race relations
Subject:
Minority Studies - Race Relations
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - African American Studies - Histor
Subject:
United States - State & Local - Midwest
Subject:
General History
Copyright:
Publication Date:
March 2006
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
1 8-PAGE BandW INSERT
Pages:
512
Dimensions:
9.28x6.56x1.66 in. 1.77 lbs.

Related Subjects


History and Social Science » Americana » Midwest

Our Town: A Heartland Lynching, a Haunted Town, and the Hidden History of White America
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 512 pages Crown Publishers - English 9780517705063 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Former Village Voice arts writer Carr has crafted a searing look at race in America that combines investigative journalism with an intensely personal family history. She uses the 1930 lynching of two African-American men in Marion, Ind., where her father and grandfather grew up, as a prism to examine not only the psychology of the lynch mob members but the thousands of bystanders, some of whom were immortalized in a revolting and haunting photograph, which shows townspeople gathering to stare at the mutilated corpses, still dangling from their nooses. Carr's discovery that her beloved grandfather belonged to the Ku Klux Klan and may have been involved in the hate crime leads her to return to Marion and ask questions that many on both sides of the racial divide find uncomfortable. Carr's sense that she bears — that we all bear — a burden of guilt allows her an empathy that enables her to gain access to present-day Klan members, who talk freely about their ideology; her refusal to view herself as morally superior to them lends power to her observations, and her lack of self-righteousness is refreshing. This outstanding narrative is an excellent companion to last year's Blood Done Sign My Name and Arc of Justice, which also used a crime as an entry point into the struggle for civil rights. With the Hurricane Katrina catastrophe reviving the debate on the state of race relations in this country, this book will have an extra topicality in addition to its narrative power that should deservedly attract a wide audience." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review A Day" by , "Cynthia Carr has written a book not about the subject ostensibly at hand but about herself. Everything is me, me, me....Like too many other journalists writing books these days, Carr is under the impression that how she got her story and how she feels about it are more interesting (and, implicitly, more important) than the story itself. She could not be more wrong." (read the entire Washington Post review)
"Review" by , "Carr's Marion, with its family and racial secrets, provides a glimpse at a complex America, not so distant in our past that its ghosts aren't capable of haunting us today."
"Review" by , "[M]ost powerfully, [Carr] considers the question of the guilt one feels for deeds done — and not done — by beloved relatives....An exhaustive, courageous examination of racism's horrifying but sometimes very familiar face."
"Review" by , "We need reminders of where we once were, so we don't go back. In bringing these events to the attention of a wider audience, Carr has done an important service."
"Review" by , "[A] stunning book....This beautifully written, detail-filled work brings together the historical and personal in a powerful and moving fashion and belongs on the shelves of every U.S. library."
"Review" by , "Unfortunately, [the] intriguing developments too often receive only limited attention in Our Town, making it a less useful, illuminating book than it might have been."
"Review" by , "[A] great shaggy beast of a book, far longer than it needed to be....[Carr] gets bogged down in family history unrelated to her themes. Mounds of raw, unassimilated data clog the storytelling."
"Review" by , "One of the great books written about race in America....Carr's great accomplishment in this courageous, compelling work of reporting and reflection is to show with absolute clarity that bloody trees stood in more than one place in this country."
"Synopsis" by , Intensely compelling, Our Town is Carr's epic account of a brutal lynching that took place in 1930 in Marion, Indiana, and the town's struggle to forget the events of that terrible night. 8-page photo insert.
"Synopsis" by , On August 7, 1930, three black teenagers were dragged from their jail cells in Marion, Indiana, and beaten before a howling mob. Two of them were hanged; by fate the third escaped. A photo taken that night shows the bodies hanging from the tree but focuses on the faces in the crowd — some enraged, some laughing, and some subdued, perhaps already feeling the first pangs of regret.

Sixty-three years later, journalist Cynthia Carr began searching the photo for her grandfather's face.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.