Mega Dose
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Interviews | September 2, 2014

Jill Owens: IMG David Mitchell: The Powells.com Interview



David MitchellDavid Mitchell's newest mind-bending, time-skipping novel may be his most accomplished work yet. Written in six sections, one per decade, The Bone... Continue »
  1. $21.00 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    The Bone Clocks

    David Mitchell 9781400065677

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$6.95
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Burnside Nature Studies- Primates

This title in other editions

The Hunt for the Dawn Monkey

by

The Hunt for the Dawn Monkey Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Taking us back roughly 45 million years into the Eocene, "the dawn of recent life," Chris Beard, a world-renowned expert on the primate fossil record, offers a tantalizing new perspective on our deepest evolutionary roots. In a fast-paced narrative full of vivid stories from the field, he reconstructs our extended family tree, showing that the first anthropoids—the diverse and successful group that includes monkeys, apes, and humans—evolved millions of years earlier than was previously suspected and emerged in Asia rather than Africa.

In The Hunt for the Dawn Monkey, Beard chronicles the saga of two centuries of scientific exploration in search of anthropoid origins, from the early work of Georges Cuvier, the father of paleontology, to the latest discoveries in Asia, Africa, and North America's Rocky Mountains. Against this historical backdrop, he weaves the story of how his own expeditions have unearthed crucial fossils—including the controversial primate Eosimias—that support his compelling new vision of anthropoid evolution. The only book written for a wide audience that explores this remote phase of our own evolutionary history, The Hunt for the Dawn Monkey adds a fascinating new chapter to our understanding of humanity's relationship to the rest of life on earth.

Review:

"In recent years, paleontologists have feuded over the origins — long assumed to be African — of our very distant ancestors, the anthropoid primates. Fossil expert Beard presents his controversial case for Asia in this dense chronicle. Searching in central China for bones from the Eocene epoch, Beard's assistant Wen Chaohua, a local farmer, found an extraordinarily intact fossil jaw of the tiny prosimian Eosimias ('dawn monkey'). This jaw, Beard believes, will link small Asian primates such as tarsiers with the distant anthropoid ancestors of humans. Not exactly the Bigfoot-like missing link of popular imagination, but as Beard notes wryly, 'The dirty little secret of paleoanthropology is that, while there are plenty of missing links, they don't occur where most people think they do.' Knowing his findings will create an 'academic brouhaha,' Beard spends 300 pages building an intricate case for his tarsier theory. To establish context and popularize the subject, he describes the work of Georges Cuvier (1769 — 1832) and other noted paleontologists. But he also includes endless details about tiny skulls and their components, scientific conferences, global climate change hypotheses and the minutiae of Darwinist theory. Tales of harsh field expeditions make for good reading, and Beard's findings tell a startling scientific story, but information overload keeps this book from being suitable for most general readers. Illus." Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Book News Annotation:

The real missing link in paleoanthropology is not so much in the fossil record for early humans, but in the fossil record of the first anthropoids, the common ancestors of monkeys, apes, and people, according to Beard (Curator and Head of the Section of Vertebrate Paleontology at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History). He provides both an overview of 200 years of work looking for anthropoid origins and a recounting of his own work in the area, including the reaction to his controversial proposal that the earliest anthropoids originated in Asia (splitting of from Tarsiers in the Eocene). Writing for a general audience, he explains much of the basic science and competing theories of the paleoanthropology of early anthropoids and defends his Asia hypothesis, while simultaneously offering a window into the human drama that so often characterizes scientific competition and debate.
Annotation 2004 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

"This could be the ultimate book on our origins. For the first time, Chris Beard sheds light on a hitherto little-known yet highly controversial area of paleontology—the search for the ancestry of monkeys, apes and, ultimately, humans."—Henry Gee, author of In Search of Deep Time

"Beard's book is the Lucy of anthropoid origins--an adventure story of scientific discovery in exotic places that introduces the reader to some interesting personalities of primate paleontology."—John G. Fleagle, author of Primate Adaptation and Evolution

"The search for our origins does not stop with the first member of our own species, or even the first ape that stood upright. Our earliest primate ancestors also bequeathed us many of our most important features. Chris Beard offers a fascinating, personal survey of what we know about these delicate creatures, who ultimately gave rise to ourselves."—Carl Zimmer, author of Soul Made Flesh and Evolution

"Chris Beard's exciting fossil discoveries and his bold new ideas show us that our very early origins were in Asia and not, as previously thought, in Africa."—Alan Walker, coauthor of The Wisdom of the Bones

About the Author

Chris Beard is Curator and Head, Section of Vertebrate Paleontology, Carnegie Museum of Natural History and winner of a MacArthur "genius" grant.

Table of Contents

Preface

Chapter One. Missing Links and Dawn Monkeys

Chapter Two. Toward Egypts Sacred Bull

Chapter Three. A Gem from the Willwood

Chapter Four. The Forest in the Sahara

Chapter Five. Received Wisdom

Chapter Six. The Birth of a Ghost Lineage

Chapter Seven. Initial Hints from Deep Time

Chapter Eight. Ghost Busters

Chapter Nine. Resurrecting the Ghost

Chapter Ten. Into the African Melting Pot

Chapter Eleven. Paleoanthropology and Pithecophobia

Notes

Bibliography

Product Details

ISBN:
9780520233690
Subtitle:
Unearthing the Origins of Monkeys, Apes, and Humans
Author:
Klingler, Mark
Illustrator:
Klingler, Mark
Author:
Klinger, Mark
Author:
Beard, Christopher
Author:
Klingler, Mark
Publisher:
University of California Press
Location:
Berkeley
Subject:
General
Subject:
Paleontology
Subject:
Human beings
Subject:
Fossils
Subject:
Fossil hominids
Subject:
Primates, Fossil.
Subject:
Monkeys, Fossil.
Subject:
Paleoanthropology
Subject:
Life Sciences - Evolution
Subject:
Human beings -- Origin.
Subject:
Evolution
Subject:
Geology-Paleontology
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Series Volume:
3205
Publication Date:
20041220
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
14 color illustrations, 26 b/w photograp
Pages:
363
Dimensions:
9 x 6 x 1 in 1.05 lb

Other books you might like

  1. Singing to the Sound: Visions of... Used Hardcover $3.48
  2. A Sand County Almanac: And Sketches...
    Used Trade Paper $8.50
  3. The Ten Trusts: What We Must Do to... Used Trade Paper $6.50
  4. Lost Dinosaurs the Astonishing Discovery Used Trade Paper $6.50
  5. The Agile Gene: How Nature Turns on... Used Trade Paper $8.00
  6. Discovery Channel: Night Sky: An... Used Trade Paper $5.95

Related Subjects

Science and Mathematics » Biology » Evolution
Science and Mathematics » Geology » Paleontology
Science and Mathematics » Nature Studies » Mammals » Primates

The Hunt for the Dawn Monkey Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$6.95 In Stock
Product details 363 pages University of California Press - English 9780520233690 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In recent years, paleontologists have feuded over the origins — long assumed to be African — of our very distant ancestors, the anthropoid primates. Fossil expert Beard presents his controversial case for Asia in this dense chronicle. Searching in central China for bones from the Eocene epoch, Beard's assistant Wen Chaohua, a local farmer, found an extraordinarily intact fossil jaw of the tiny prosimian Eosimias ('dawn monkey'). This jaw, Beard believes, will link small Asian primates such as tarsiers with the distant anthropoid ancestors of humans. Not exactly the Bigfoot-like missing link of popular imagination, but as Beard notes wryly, 'The dirty little secret of paleoanthropology is that, while there are plenty of missing links, they don't occur where most people think they do.' Knowing his findings will create an 'academic brouhaha,' Beard spends 300 pages building an intricate case for his tarsier theory. To establish context and popularize the subject, he describes the work of Georges Cuvier (1769 — 1832) and other noted paleontologists. But he also includes endless details about tiny skulls and their components, scientific conferences, global climate change hypotheses and the minutiae of Darwinist theory. Tales of harsh field expeditions make for good reading, and Beard's findings tell a startling scientific story, but information overload keeps this book from being suitable for most general readers. Illus." Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by ,
"This could be the ultimate book on our origins. For the first time, Chris Beard sheds light on a hitherto little-known yet highly controversial area of paleontology—the search for the ancestry of monkeys, apes and, ultimately, humans."—Henry Gee, author of In Search of Deep Time

"Beard's book is the Lucy of anthropoid origins--an adventure story of scientific discovery in exotic places that introduces the reader to some interesting personalities of primate paleontology."—John G. Fleagle, author of Primate Adaptation and Evolution

"The search for our origins does not stop with the first member of our own species, or even the first ape that stood upright. Our earliest primate ancestors also bequeathed us many of our most important features. Chris Beard offers a fascinating, personal survey of what we know about these delicate creatures, who ultimately gave rise to ourselves."—Carl Zimmer, author of Soul Made Flesh and Evolution

"Chris Beard's exciting fossil discoveries and his bold new ideas show us that our very early origins were in Asia and not, as previously thought, in Africa."—Alan Walker, coauthor of The Wisdom of the Bones

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.