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1 Burnside Music- Jazz Biography

The Ellington Century

by

The Ellington Century Cover

ISBN13: 9780520245877
ISBN10: 0520245873
All Product Details

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

andquot;In his brilliant new book, Richard Leppert examines the nexus of sound recording, opera, and film in the emergence of twentieth-century modernity and its subjectivities. Whether focusing on Pucciniand#39;s La fanciulla del West or the films of Terrence Malick, he finds unexpected tensions between the aspirations, pleasures, and traumas of the last hundred years. Only someone equally versed in music, cinema, and cultural theory could have produced such a feast.andquot;andmdash;Susan McClary, 1995 MacArthur Fellow; author of Desire and Pleasure in Seventeenth-Century Music

andquot;Leppert traces modernityandrsquo;s attempts to recover or reimagine a redemptive Nature in aand#160;series of works that span the twentieth century. Boldly confronting their modes ofand#160;production and reproduction as exemplifying a Technology that seems to oppose theand#160;natural, and also straddling the andlsquo;great divideandrsquo; between high and mass cultural forms, hisand#160;study marries taut critical theory with generous celebration of the music, operas, andand#160;films with which it deals. It brilliantly manages to unite ecological, philosophical, andand#160;political themes in an interdisciplinary fashion that is profound and provocative.andquot;andmdash;Peter Franklin, author of Seeing through Music: Gender and Modernism in Classic Hollywoodand#160;Film Scores and Reclaiming Late-Romantic Music: Singing Devils and Distantand#160;Sounds

andquot;Any book by Richard Leppert is a major intellectual event, but this one is especially indispensable at a time when our core conceptions of nature and technology have never been more important or more contested. Aesthetic Technologiesand#160;writes the modern pre-history of our current condition, with all the breadth of learning and clarity of expression at the command of its author, who is unsurpassed in both. Not since Friedrich Kittlerandrsquo;sand#160;Gramophone Film Typewriterand#160;has there been a book this important on the links between media and subjectivity. And not since, well, ever, has anyone shown how foundational music and the technologies of its delivery have been to the proliferation of those links. The details are fascinating; the argument is compelling. Read this book.andquot;andmdash;Lawrence Kramer, author of The Thought of Music andand#160;Expression and Truth

Review:

"Esteemed composer and musician Schiff (George Gershwin: Rhapsody in Blue) flexes his authorial muscles once again with a self-confessed 'bundle of love letters' to the late, great jazz pianist and big band leader Duke Ellington. In true jazz fashion, Schiff exults, 'I allowed myself to be disorderly and intuitive, as if I were improvising.' But Schiff is nevertheless rather methodical in walking the reader through Ellington's groundbreaking sound — counting bars, tapping tempos, expounding on transitions, and always reveling in the music. A gifted painter in his youth and an artist in every sense, 'Ellington called many of his compositions ‘tone parallels' or ‘portraits'; his music linked sounds and images.' Schiff compliments this notion with quotations from Copland, Schoenberg, Rilke, Rimbaud, and Zola to contextualize and highlight the 'complex web of sensory associations' and ultimately conceive a 'jazz panorama' made up of the technical elements of Ellington's unique style. Dissecting the form of perhaps his most famous 'mood' composition, 'Mood Indigo,' Schiff addresses the 'syntax' and 'imagery' of the piece; evoking 'love, tears, the railway.' Always musically rather than autobiographically focused (even links to Kandinsky are made on artistic terms, not social), Schiff plainly argues the accessibility of Ellington's 'Symbolist aesthetic.' Drawing parallels with the sophisticated, calculated compositions of Debussy, while still acknowledging the juxtaposition of improvisation and 'Arcane modernism,' Schiff's ode to Ellington is a joy. (Feb.)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

Virginia Woolf famously claimed that, around December 1910, human character changed. Aesthetic Technologies addresses how music (especially opera), the phonograph, and film served as cultural agents facilitating the many extraordinary social, artistic, and cultural shifts that characterized the new century and much of what followed long thereafter, even to the present. Three tropes are central: the tensions and traumasand#151;cultural, social, and personaland#151;associated with modernity; changes in human subjectivity and its engagement and representation in music and film; and the more general societal impact of modern media, sound recording (the development of the phonograph in particular), and the critical role played by early-century opera recording. A principal focus of the book is the conflicted relationship in Western modernity to nature, particularly as nature is perceived in opposition to culture and articulated through music, film, and sound as agents of fundamental, sometimes shocking transformation. The book considers the sound/vision world of modernity filtered through the lens of aesthetic modernism and rapid technological change, and the impact of both, experienced with the prescient sense that there could be no turning back.

Synopsis:

The Ellington Century is a wonderful journey through the world of music and art. If you are already an aficionado of Ellington's music, you will enjoy the author's informative and detailed analysis of the composer's work and musical influences. If you are less familiar, this book puts Ellington's music in perspective with the great ‘classical composers of the twentieth century. David Schiff's remarkable insight into the historical and musical parallels between these composers is a delight to read and his references are vast, from Schoenbergs Pierrot Lunaire and Stravinskys Agon to televisions Sesame Street. Schiff writes with a sense of humor and an enthusiasm for Ellington's music that comes out on every page.”—George Manahan, Music Director, American Composers Orchestra

“David Schiff points us forward, observing that ‘Ellingtons music asks us to see with our ears and hear with our eyes. Writing as a composer and scholar, he has a gift for making complex ideas strikingly clear. His insights move across a huge terrain of twentieth-century culture, as he builds bridges in his musical and cultural analysis where many have not seen a connection. Yet each musical work, each artist, is given his or her equal due. In this sense, he has met the spiritual and cultural challenge of Ellingtons life work.”—Marty Ehrlich, Composer/Instrumentalist, Associate Professor of Improvisation and Contemporary Music, Hampshire College

About the Author

David Alan Schiff is R.P. Wollenberg Professor of Music at Reed College. He is a composer, journalist whose articles have appeared in publications including the New York Times and the Atlantic, and the author of George Gershwin: Rhapsody in Blue and The Music of Elliot Carter.

Table of Contents

Preface

Acknowledgments

Part I: Overture: Such Sweet Thunder

1. “Blue Light”: Color

2. “Cotton Tail”: Rhythm

3. “Prelude to a Kiss”: Melody

4. “Satin Doll”: Harmony

Part II: Entracte: “Sepia Panorama”

5. “Warm Valley”: Love

6. Black, Brown and Beige: History

7. “Heaven”: God

Notes

Bibliography

Index

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

books, March 8, 2012 (view all comments by books)
Is there something about the century other than its music in the title choice? Is "Ellington Century" a metaphor for social history of 20th century, at same time it is a study of Ellington's music? Much went right in 20th century, such as his music, but where "voice" was not clear in music, nor clear in social policy, so much went wrong--or was painfully tolerated. Does Schiff chose this title because, except for results of rare clarity, 20th century was a series of accidents?
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9780520245877
Author:
Schiff, David
Publisher:
University of California Press
Author:
Leppert, Richard
Subject:
Music -- History and criticism.
Subject:
General Music
Subject:
Opera
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
20120231
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
81 color, 61 b/w, 19 music examples, 4 t
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
10 x 7 in

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Music » General
Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Jazz
Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Jazz » Biographies
Arts and Entertainment » Music » History and Criticism
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Featured Titles » Biography
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Medical Specialties
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The Ellington Century New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$36.95 In Stock
Product details 336 pages University of California Press - English 9780520245877 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Esteemed composer and musician Schiff (George Gershwin: Rhapsody in Blue) flexes his authorial muscles once again with a self-confessed 'bundle of love letters' to the late, great jazz pianist and big band leader Duke Ellington. In true jazz fashion, Schiff exults, 'I allowed myself to be disorderly and intuitive, as if I were improvising.' But Schiff is nevertheless rather methodical in walking the reader through Ellington's groundbreaking sound — counting bars, tapping tempos, expounding on transitions, and always reveling in the music. A gifted painter in his youth and an artist in every sense, 'Ellington called many of his compositions ‘tone parallels' or ‘portraits'; his music linked sounds and images.' Schiff compliments this notion with quotations from Copland, Schoenberg, Rilke, Rimbaud, and Zola to contextualize and highlight the 'complex web of sensory associations' and ultimately conceive a 'jazz panorama' made up of the technical elements of Ellington's unique style. Dissecting the form of perhaps his most famous 'mood' composition, 'Mood Indigo,' Schiff addresses the 'syntax' and 'imagery' of the piece; evoking 'love, tears, the railway.' Always musically rather than autobiographically focused (even links to Kandinsky are made on artistic terms, not social), Schiff plainly argues the accessibility of Ellington's 'Symbolist aesthetic.' Drawing parallels with the sophisticated, calculated compositions of Debussy, while still acknowledging the juxtaposition of improvisation and 'Arcane modernism,' Schiff's ode to Ellington is a joy. (Feb.)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,
Virginia Woolf famously claimed that, around December 1910, human character changed. Aesthetic Technologies addresses how music (especially opera), the phonograph, and film served as cultural agents facilitating the many extraordinary social, artistic, and cultural shifts that characterized the new century and much of what followed long thereafter, even to the present. Three tropes are central: the tensions and traumasand#151;cultural, social, and personaland#151;associated with modernity; changes in human subjectivity and its engagement and representation in music and film; and the more general societal impact of modern media, sound recording (the development of the phonograph in particular), and the critical role played by early-century opera recording. A principal focus of the book is the conflicted relationship in Western modernity to nature, particularly as nature is perceived in opposition to culture and articulated through music, film, and sound as agents of fundamental, sometimes shocking transformation. The book considers the sound/vision world of modernity filtered through the lens of aesthetic modernism and rapid technological change, and the impact of both, experienced with the prescient sense that there could be no turning back.
"Synopsis" by ,
The Ellington Century is a wonderful journey through the world of music and art. If you are already an aficionado of Ellington's music, you will enjoy the author's informative and detailed analysis of the composer's work and musical influences. If you are less familiar, this book puts Ellington's music in perspective with the great ‘classical composers of the twentieth century. David Schiff's remarkable insight into the historical and musical parallels between these composers is a delight to read and his references are vast, from Schoenbergs Pierrot Lunaire and Stravinskys Agon to televisions Sesame Street. Schiff writes with a sense of humor and an enthusiasm for Ellington's music that comes out on every page.”—George Manahan, Music Director, American Composers Orchestra

“David Schiff points us forward, observing that ‘Ellingtons music asks us to see with our ears and hear with our eyes. Writing as a composer and scholar, he has a gift for making complex ideas strikingly clear. His insights move across a huge terrain of twentieth-century culture, as he builds bridges in his musical and cultural analysis where many have not seen a connection. Yet each musical work, each artist, is given his or her equal due. In this sense, he has met the spiritual and cultural challenge of Ellingtons life work.”—Marty Ehrlich, Composer/Instrumentalist, Associate Professor of Improvisation and Contemporary Music, Hampshire College

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