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1 Burnside Music- World Music

Music of the African Diaspora #11: Mek Some Noise: Gospel Music and the Ethics of Style in Trinidad

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Music of the African Diaspora #11: Mek Some Noise: Gospel Music and the Ethics of Style in Trinidad Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"Mek Some Noise", Timothy Rommens ethnographic study of Trinidadian gospel music, engages the multiple musical styles circulating in the nations Full Gospel community and illustrates the carefully negotiated and contested spaces that they occupy in relationship to questions of identity. By exploring gospelypso, jamoo (“Jehovahs music”), gospel dancehall, and North American gospel music, along with the discourses that surround performances in these styles, he illustrates the extent to which value, meaning, and appropriateness are continually circumscribed and reinterpreted in the process of coming to terms with what it looks and sounds like to be a Full Gospel believer in Trinidad. The local, regional, and transnational implications of these musical styles, moreover, are read in relationship to their impact on belief (and vice versa), revealing the particularly nuanced poetics of conviction that drive both apologists and detractors of these styles.

Rommen sets his investigation against a concisely drawn, richly historical narrative and introduces a theoretical approach which he calls the "ethics of style"—a model that privileges the convictions embedded in this context and that emphasizes their role in shaping the terms upon which identity is continually being constructed in Trinidad. The result is an extended meditation on the convictions that lie behind the creation and reception of style in Full Gospel Trinidad.

Copub: Center for Black Music Research

Synopsis:

""'Mek Some Noise'" combines rich ethnographic details with a conceptually innovative perspective on the embattled field that music represents for Full Gospel Christians in Trinidad. Compelling, incisive, and original, this book makes a superb contribution to an understanding of music, identity, and spirituality in and beyond the Caribbean."--Jocelyne Guilbault, author of "Zouk: World Music in the West Indies"

Synopsis:

"'Mek Some Noise' combines rich ethnographic details with a conceptually innovative perspective on the embattled field that music represents for Full Gospel Christians in Trinidad. Compelling, incisive, and original, this book makes a superb contribution to an understanding of music, identity, and spirituality in and beyond the Caribbean."—Jocelyne Guilbault, author of Zouk: World Music in the West Indies

"Timothy Rommen's persuasive argument about the ethics of style in Trinidadian Full Gospel worship possesses not only regional but global implications for the study of music in community. Significantly expanding on subcultural theory, Rommen captures the power of belief and conviction in musical life. This book guides us on an exploration of the role that musical style plays in moral and ethical discourse, skillfully illustrating how our musical choices reveal our ethical judgments."—Gage Averill, Dean of Music, University of Toronto

Synopsis:

Mek Some Noise, Timothy Rommen's highly personal ethnographic study of Caribbean gospel music, engages the musical world of contemporary Christians in Trinidad and Tobago at the nexus where music and religion meet. In Trinidad and Tobago the Full Gospel Pentecostal churches are negotiating a wide range of musical styles, many of which are more closely associated in the minds of outsiders with dance halls and the revels of carnival than with worship. Rommen focuses on four main styles: gospelypso, North American gospel, dancehall, and jamoo (Jehovah's music). He explores the powerful role that music plays in the lives of Full Gospel believers and the way in which music helps to convince and to actualize belief.

Rommen sets his investigation against a concisely drawn, richly historical narrative. He writes about music and its power to persuade, but he also gives deep consideration to the fact of people making music in order to say something. Using a wealth of materials previously ignored by scholars, Rommen arrives at a new theoretical approach which he calls the ethics of style, and which situates this group of believers both in their faith and in a Trinidadian context. The result is an extended meditation on the convictions, or ethical concerns, that lie behind the creation and reception of style in Full Gospel Trinidad.

About the Author

Timothy Rommen is Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology at the University of Pennsylvania.

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations

Acknowledgments

Introduction

1. Music, Memory, and Identity in Full Gospel Trinidad

2. The Ethics of Style

3. Nationalism and the Soul: Gospelypso as Independence

4. Transnational Dreams, Global Desires: North America as Sound

5. Regionalisms: Performances beyond a Boundary

6. Jehovahs Music: Jammin at the Margins of Trinidadian Gospel Music

7. Reenvisioning Ethics, Revisiting Style

Epilogue

Notes

Selected Bibliography

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780520250680
Author:
Rommen, Timothy
Publisher:
University of California Press
Subject:
History and criticism
Subject:
Ethnomusicology
Subject:
Gospel music
Subject:
Religious - Gospel
Subject:
Gospel music - Trinidad and Tobago -
Subject:
MUSIC / Ethnomusicology
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Music of the African Diaspora
Series Volume:
11
Publication Date:
20070431
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
Professional and scholarly
Language:
English
Illustrations:
4 b/w photographs, 5 line illustrations,
Pages:
230
Dimensions:
9 x 6 x 0.5 in 11 oz

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Music » Ethnomusicology
Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Religious » Gospel
Arts and Entertainment » Music » Latin America
Arts and Entertainment » Music » World Music
Religion » Comparative Religion » General

Music of the African Diaspora #11: Mek Some Noise: Gospel Music and the Ethics of Style in Trinidad Used Trade Paper
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Product details 230 pages University of California Press - English 9780520250680 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , ""'Mek Some Noise'" combines rich ethnographic details with a conceptually innovative perspective on the embattled field that music represents for Full Gospel Christians in Trinidad. Compelling, incisive, and original, this book makes a superb contribution to an understanding of music, identity, and spirituality in and beyond the Caribbean."--Jocelyne Guilbault, author of "Zouk: World Music in the West Indies"
"Synopsis" by ,
"'Mek Some Noise' combines rich ethnographic details with a conceptually innovative perspective on the embattled field that music represents for Full Gospel Christians in Trinidad. Compelling, incisive, and original, this book makes a superb contribution to an understanding of music, identity, and spirituality in and beyond the Caribbean."—Jocelyne Guilbault, author of Zouk: World Music in the West Indies

"Timothy Rommen's persuasive argument about the ethics of style in Trinidadian Full Gospel worship possesses not only regional but global implications for the study of music in community. Significantly expanding on subcultural theory, Rommen captures the power of belief and conviction in musical life. This book guides us on an exploration of the role that musical style plays in moral and ethical discourse, skillfully illustrating how our musical choices reveal our ethical judgments."—Gage Averill, Dean of Music, University of Toronto

"Synopsis" by , Mek Some Noise, Timothy Rommen's highly personal ethnographic study of Caribbean gospel music, engages the musical world of contemporary Christians in Trinidad and Tobago at the nexus where music and religion meet. In Trinidad and Tobago the Full Gospel Pentecostal churches are negotiating a wide range of musical styles, many of which are more closely associated in the minds of outsiders with dance halls and the revels of carnival than with worship. Rommen focuses on four main styles: gospelypso, North American gospel, dancehall, and jamoo (Jehovah's music). He explores the powerful role that music plays in the lives of Full Gospel believers and the way in which music helps to convince and to actualize belief.

Rommen sets his investigation against a concisely drawn, richly historical narrative. He writes about music and its power to persuade, but he also gives deep consideration to the fact of people making music in order to say something. Using a wealth of materials previously ignored by scholars, Rommen arrives at a new theoretical approach which he calls the ethics of style, and which situates this group of believers both in their faith and in a Trinidadian context. The result is an extended meditation on the convictions, or ethical concerns, that lie behind the creation and reception of style in Full Gospel Trinidad.

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