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Children in the Visual Arts of Ancient Rome

by

Children in the Visual Arts of Ancient Rome Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Modern approaches to Roman imperialism have characterized Romanization as a benign or neutral process of cultural exchange between Roman and non-Roman, conqueror and conquered. Though supported by some literary and archaeological evidence, these theories are not reflected in the visual imagery of the Roman ruling elite. In official imperial art, Roman children are most often shown in depictions of peaceful public gatherings before the emperor, whereas non-Roman children appear only in scenes of submission, triumph, or violent military activity. Images of children, those most fraught with potential in Roman art, underscore the contrast between Roman and non-Roman and as a group present a narrative of Roman identity. As Jeannine Uzzi argues in this study, the stark contrast between images of Roman and non-Roman children conveys the ruling elite's notions of what it meant to be Roman.

Synopsis:

In this study, Jeannine Uzzi examines the ruling elite's notions of what it meant to be Roman by examining images of children in Roman imperial art. Roman children are most often shown in depictions of peaceful public gatherings before the emperor, whereas non-Roman children appear only in scenes of submission, triumph, or violent military activity.

Synopsis:

In this study, Jeannine Uzzi uses the stark contrast between images of Roman and non-Roman children in imperial Roman art to explore the ruling elite's notions of what it meant to be Roman. In official imperial art, Roman children are most often shown in depictions of peaceful public gatherings before the emperor, whereas non-Roman children appear only in scenes of submission, triumph, or violent military activity. Images of children, those most fraught with potential in Roman art, underscore the contrast between Roman and non-Roman and as a group present a narrative of Roman identity.

Synopsis:

Examines the ruling elite's notions of what it meant to be Roman by examining images of children in Roman art.

About the Author

Jeannine Uzzi is assistant professor of classics at the University of Southern Maine.

Table of Contents

1. Introduction: the question; 2. Evidence, methodology, and the child image; 3. Imperial largesse; 4. Public gathering; 5. Anaglypha Traiani/Hadriani; 6. Submission; 7. Triumph; 8. Battle ground; 9. Ara Pacis; 10. Conclusion: a narrative of identity; Appendix: Children in nonofficial imagery.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780521820264
Author:
Uzzi, Jeannine Diddl
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Author:
Uzzi, Jeannine
Author:
Uzzi, Jeannine Diddle
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
General Art
Subject:
Subjects & Themes - General
Subject:
Children in art
Subject:
Art and state
Subject:
Identity (Psychology) in art
Subject:
Art - General
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20050631
Binding:
Hardcover
Grade Level:
Professional and scholarly
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
266

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Art » General
Arts and Entertainment » Art » Roman
History and Social Science » Linguistics » Specific Languages and Groups
Reference » Words Phrases and Language

Children in the Visual Arts of Ancient Rome Sale Hardcover
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Product details 266 pages Cambridge University Press - English 9780521820264 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , In this study, Jeannine Uzzi examines the ruling elite's notions of what it meant to be Roman by examining images of children in Roman imperial art. Roman children are most often shown in depictions of peaceful public gatherings before the emperor, whereas non-Roman children appear only in scenes of submission, triumph, or violent military activity.
"Synopsis" by , In this study, Jeannine Uzzi uses the stark contrast between images of Roman and non-Roman children in imperial Roman art to explore the ruling elite's notions of what it meant to be Roman. In official imperial art, Roman children are most often shown in depictions of peaceful public gatherings before the emperor, whereas non-Roman children appear only in scenes of submission, triumph, or violent military activity. Images of children, those most fraught with potential in Roman art, underscore the contrast between Roman and non-Roman and as a group present a narrative of Roman identity.
"Synopsis" by , Examines the ruling elite's notions of what it meant to be Roman by examining images of children in Roman art.
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