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1 Home & Garden Cooking and Food- Historical Food and Cooking

This title in other editions

A Revolution in Taste: The Rise of French Cuisine, 1650-1800

by

A Revolution in Taste: The Rise of French Cuisine, 1650-1800 Cover

ISBN13: 9780521821995
ISBN10: 0521821991
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Modern French habits of cooking, eating, and drinking were born in the Ancien Regime, radically breaking with culinary traditions that originated in antiquity and creating a new aesthetic. This new culinary culture saw food and wine as important links between human beings and nature. Authentic foodstuffs and simple preparations became the hallmarks of the modern style. Pinkard traces the roots and development of this culinary revolution to many different historical trends, including changes in material culture, social transformations, medical theory and practice, and the Enlightenment. Pinkard illuminates the complex cultural meaning of food in her history of the new French cooking from its origins in the 1650s through the emergence of cuisine bourgeoise and the original nouvelle cuisine in the decades before 1789. This book also discusses the evolution of culinary techniques and includes historical recipes adapted for today 's kitchens.

Review:

"The French have been inextricably tied with fine cuisine, and Pinkard's accessible and often fascinating examination of the country's culinary evolution gives foodies a rich, savory treat. Beginning with medieval cooking, characterized by strong seasonings that gave food a singular flavor, Pinkard explains how cooking was greatly influenced by early medicine, which insisted that the body's 'humours' could be regulated by spices. As more fruits and vegetables made their way onto French tables, preparation methods evolved. By the mid 1600s, cooks began to emphasize tastes and textures, first incorporating the sauces now associated with classic French cooking. By the mid 1700s there was a drive toward lightness and simplicity called nouvelle cuisine, 'a style that could be just as expensive, subtle and exacting to execute as its twentieth-century namesake.' Though she rarely points out similarities to current trends like 'slow food' and organic ingredients, the parallels are clear and relevant. Digressions on eating patterns, typical meals, the evolution of the dinner party and classic recipes (reproduced in an appendix) add interest and depth. Despite occasional ventures into academic minutiae, anyone interested in the evolution of modern cooking and entertaining is sure to find Pinkard's history a wealth of lore and trivia." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

Pinkard traces the development of modern French habits of cooking, eating, and drinking from their roots in the Ancien Regime.

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Helen Cota, December 24, 2008 (view all comments by Helen Cota)
This isn't just about how French cuisine came to be the epitome of fine dining. It's also about how regular people ate during medieval and renaissance times. For instance, many working Parisians in 1700 ate "fast food" most days -- take-away bowls of soup or small meat pies. Not only did both men and women work all day, and were therefore too tired to cook, but they lived in small apartments without kitchens or room to store food. A Revolution in Taste is a fascinating social history with food as the focus.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780521821995
Author:
Pinkard, Susan
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Subject:
Europe - General
Subject:
Cookery, french
Subject:
Food habits
Subject:
Customs & Traditions
Subject:
Europe - France
Subject:
History
Subject:
Regional & Ethnic - French
Subject:
Cookery, French -- History -- 18th century.
Subject:
Cookery, French -- History -- 17th century.
Subject:
World History-France
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20081131
Binding:
Hardcover
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
317
Dimensions:
9.22x6.36x1.02 in. 1.31 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Cooking and Food » Reference and Etiquette » Historical Food and Cooking
Cooking and Food » Regional and Ethnic » French
History and Social Science » Europe » France » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » General
History and Social Science » World History » France » General
Science and Mathematics » Physics » General

A Revolution in Taste: The Rise of French Cuisine, 1650-1800 Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$9.95 In Stock
Product details 317 pages Cambridge University Press - English 9780521821995 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "The French have been inextricably tied with fine cuisine, and Pinkard's accessible and often fascinating examination of the country's culinary evolution gives foodies a rich, savory treat. Beginning with medieval cooking, characterized by strong seasonings that gave food a singular flavor, Pinkard explains how cooking was greatly influenced by early medicine, which insisted that the body's 'humours' could be regulated by spices. As more fruits and vegetables made their way onto French tables, preparation methods evolved. By the mid 1600s, cooks began to emphasize tastes and textures, first incorporating the sauces now associated with classic French cooking. By the mid 1700s there was a drive toward lightness and simplicity called nouvelle cuisine, 'a style that could be just as expensive, subtle and exacting to execute as its twentieth-century namesake.' Though she rarely points out similarities to current trends like 'slow food' and organic ingredients, the parallels are clear and relevant. Digressions on eating patterns, typical meals, the evolution of the dinner party and classic recipes (reproduced in an appendix) add interest and depth. Despite occasional ventures into academic minutiae, anyone interested in the evolution of modern cooking and entertaining is sure to find Pinkard's history a wealth of lore and trivia." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , Pinkard traces the development of modern French habits of cooking, eating, and drinking from their roots in the Ancien Regime.
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