Nonficionado Sale
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Visit our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Lists | May 12, 2015

    Mark Bittman: IMG Six Things You Can Do to Join the Food Movement Today



    People ask me all the time what they can do to help improve the food system. Given that some of the problems that need fixing (like unsustainable... Continue »
    1. $18.20 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$10.99
New Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Burnside Children's- History World History
9 Local Warehouse World History- European History General
25 Remote Warehouse Children's Nonfiction- World History

This title in other editions

The War to End All Wars: World War I

by

The War to End All Wars: World War I Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

As he did for frontier children in his enormously popular Children of the Wild West, Russell Freedman illuminates the lives of the American children affected by the economic and social changes of the Great Depression. Middle-class urban youth, migrant farm laborers, boxcar kids, children whose families found themselves struggling for survival . . . all Depression-era young people faced challenges like unemployed and demoralized parents, inadequate food and shelter, schools they couldnand#8217;t attend because they had to go to work, schools that simply closed their doors. Even so, life had its bright spotsand#151;like favorite games and radio showsand#151;and many young people remained upbeat and optimistic about the future.

Drawing on memoirs, diaries, letters, and other firsthand accounts, and richly illustrated with classic archival photographs, this book by one of the most celebrated authors of nonfiction for children places the Great Depression in context and shows young readers its human face. Endnotes, selected bibliography, index.

Synopsis:

Newbery Medal winner Russell Freedman recounts Abraham Lincoln's brief friendship with African American leader Frederick Douglass before and during the Civil War, narrated against the backdrop of race relations and politics. Includes 70 archival photographs.

Synopsis:

In this clear and authoritative account, Russell Freedman illuminates for young readers the complex and rarely discussed subject of World War I, showing the ways in which the seeds of a second world war were sown in the first.

Synopsis:

A description of the boyhood, marriage, and young professional life of Abraham Lincoln includes his presidential years and also reflects on the latest scholarly thoughts about our Civil War president. Winner of the 1988 Newbery Medal.

Synopsis:

Photobiography of early twentieth-century photographer and schoolteacher Lewis Hine, using his own work as illustrations. Hines's photographs of children at work were so devastating that they convinced the American people that Congress must pass child labor laws.

Synopsis:

Historical photographs show what life was like for pioneer and Indian children growing up in the American West during the late nineteenth century.

Synopsis:

A biography of the 19th century Frenchman who developed Braille. The book spans Braille's life from childhood through his days at the Royal Institute for Blind Youth and into his final years, when the alphabet he invented was finally gaining acceptance.

Synopsis:

The intriguing story of Eleanor Roosevelt traces the life of the former First Lady from her early childhood through the tumultuous years in the White House to her active role in the founding of the United Nations after World War II. A Newberry Honor Book.

Synopsis:

Traces the life of Franklin Delano Roosevelt from his birth in 1882 through his youth, early political career, and presidency to his death in Warm Springs, Georgia, in 1945.

Synopsis:

*“Freedman sets the record straight.”—Publishers Weekly, starred review

Vaqueros, from vaca, the Spanish word for cow, were Native Americans conscripted by wealthy Spaniards to herd cattle on the Mexican plains. Often barefoot and wearing whatever clothes they had, the vaqueros became spectacular riders and masters of the art of cow herding. Three hundred years later, they taught the settlers to the American West how to round up cattle, bring down a steer, and break a wild bronco. Cowboys picked up their clothing, saddles, and lingo from the vaqueros. But it is the cowboy whose fabled reputation we remember, while the vaquero has all but disappeared from history.

*“Freedman tells the story with depth, clarity, and a vigor that conveys the thrilling excitement of the work and the macho swagger of the culture.”—Booklist, starred review

Synopsis:

Introduces readers to the proud young men who inspired a legend — the trail-driving cow herders of the late nineteenth century.

Synopsis:

In the summer of 1776, Joseph Plumb Martin was a fifteen-year-old Connecticut farm boy who considered himself "as warm a patriot as the best of them." He enlisted that July and stayed in the revolutionary army until hostilities ended in 1783. Martin fought under Washington, Lafayette, and Steuben. He took part in major battles in New York, Monmouth, and Yorktown. He wintered at Valley Forge and then at Morristown, considered even more severe. He wrote of his war years in a memoir that brings the American Revolution alive with telling details, drama, and a country boy's humor. Jim Murphy lets Joseph Plumb Martin speak for himself throughout the text, weaving in historical backfround details wherever necessary, giving voice to a teenager who was an eyewitness to the fight that set America free from the British Empire.

Synopsis:

Illustrated with archival photographs and drawings, this account reveals how this crushing evil was allowed to thrive.

Synopsis:

Boys, let us get up a club. With those words, six restless young men raided the linens at a friendand#8217;s mansion, pulled pillowcases over their heads, hopped on horses, and cavorted through the streets of Pulaski, Tennessee in 1866. The six friends named their club the Ku Klux Klan, and, all too quickly, their club grew into the self-proclaimed Invisible Empire with secret dens spread across the South. This is the story of how a secret terrorist group took root in Americaand#8217;s democracy. Filled with chilling and vivid personal accounts unearthed from oral histories, congressional documents, and diaries, this account from Newbery Honor-winning author Susan Campbell Bartoletti is a book to read and remember. A YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults Finalist.

Synopsis:

When this award-winning husband-and-wife team discovered that they each had sugar in their family history, they were inspired to trace the globe-spanning story of the sweet substance and to seek out the voices of those who led bitter sugar lives. The trail ran like a bright band from religious ceremonies in India to Europeand#8217;s Middle Ages, then on to Columbus, who brought the first cane cuttings to the Americas. Sugar was the substance that drove the bloody slave trade and caused the loss of countless lives but it also planted the seeds of revolution that led to freedom in the American colonies, Haiti, and France. With songs, oral histories, maps, and over 80 archival illustrations, here is the story of how one product allows us to see the grand currents of world history in new ways. Time line, source notes, bibliography, index.

About the Author

Russell Freedman received the Newbery Medal for Lincoln: A Photobiography. He is also the recipient of three Newbery Honors, a National Humanities Medal, the Sibert Medal, the Orbis Pictus Award, and the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award, and was selected to give the 2006 May Hill Arbuthnot Honor Lecture. Mr. Freedman lives in New York City and travels widely to research his books.

Table of Contents

ONE: A Crusader with a Camera TWO: Becoming a Photographer THREE: Seeing Is Believing FOUR: Spinners, Doffers, and Sweepers FIVE: Breaker Boys SIX: Street Kids and Farm Kids SEVEN: Making a Difference Declaration of Dependence Child Labor Then and Now Bibliography Acknowledgments and Picture Credits Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780544021716
Author:
Freedman, Russell
Publisher:
Harcourt Brace and Company
Author:
Kiesler, Kate
Author:
Bartoletti, Susan Campbell
Author:
Budhos, Marina
Author:
Aronson, Marc
Author:
Hine, Lewis
Author:
Murphy, Jim
Subject:
Political
Subject:
Military & Wars
Subject:
World History-European History General
Subject:
United States - 20th Century
Subject:
Business & Economics
Subject:
Ethnic - Native American
Subject:
General
Subject:
Women
Subject:
United States - 19th Century
Subject:
Military - United States
Subject:
Situations / Prejudice & Racism
Edition Description:
Cloth
Series Volume:
The American Revolut
Publication Date:
20130431
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 4 up to 7
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Archival photographs
Pages:
112
Dimensions:
9.5 x 9.5 in 1 lb
Age Level:
9

Other books you might like

  1. The Guns of August
    Used Mass Market $4.95

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Photography » Anthologies and History
Children's » History » World History
Children's » Nonfiction » World History » General
History and Social Science » Military » World War I
History and Social Science » World History » European History General
Young Adult » Nonfiction » History and Sociology

The War to End All Wars: World War I New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$10.99 In Stock
Product details 112 pages Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (HMH) - English 9780544021716 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
Newbery Medal winner Russell Freedman recounts Abraham Lincoln's brief friendship with African American leader Frederick Douglass before and during the Civil War, narrated against the backdrop of race relations and politics. Includes 70 archival photographs.
"Synopsis" by , In this clear and authoritative account, Russell Freedman illuminates for young readers the complex and rarely discussed subject of World War I, showing the ways in which the seeds of a second world war were sown in the first.
"Synopsis" by ,
A description of the boyhood, marriage, and young professional life of Abraham Lincoln includes his presidential years and also reflects on the latest scholarly thoughts about our Civil War president. Winner of the 1988 Newbery Medal.
"Synopsis" by ,
Photobiography of early twentieth-century photographer and schoolteacher Lewis Hine, using his own work as illustrations. Hines's photographs of children at work were so devastating that they convinced the American people that Congress must pass child labor laws.
"Synopsis" by ,
Historical photographs show what life was like for pioneer and Indian children growing up in the American West during the late nineteenth century.
"Synopsis" by ,
A biography of the 19th century Frenchman who developed Braille. The book spans Braille's life from childhood through his days at the Royal Institute for Blind Youth and into his final years, when the alphabet he invented was finally gaining acceptance.
"Synopsis" by ,
The intriguing story of Eleanor Roosevelt traces the life of the former First Lady from her early childhood through the tumultuous years in the White House to her active role in the founding of the United Nations after World War II. A Newberry Honor Book.
"Synopsis" by ,
Traces the life of Franklin Delano Roosevelt from his birth in 1882 through his youth, early political career, and presidency to his death in Warm Springs, Georgia, in 1945.
"Synopsis" by ,
*“Freedman sets the record straight.”—Publishers Weekly, starred review

Vaqueros, from vaca, the Spanish word for cow, were Native Americans conscripted by wealthy Spaniards to herd cattle on the Mexican plains. Often barefoot and wearing whatever clothes they had, the vaqueros became spectacular riders and masters of the art of cow herding. Three hundred years later, they taught the settlers to the American West how to round up cattle, bring down a steer, and break a wild bronco. Cowboys picked up their clothing, saddles, and lingo from the vaqueros. But it is the cowboy whose fabled reputation we remember, while the vaquero has all but disappeared from history.

*“Freedman tells the story with depth, clarity, and a vigor that conveys the thrilling excitement of the work and the macho swagger of the culture.”—Booklist, starred review

"Synopsis" by ,
Introduces readers to the proud young men who inspired a legend — the trail-driving cow herders of the late nineteenth century.
"Synopsis" by ,
In the summer of 1776, Joseph Plumb Martin was a fifteen-year-old Connecticut farm boy who considered himself "as warm a patriot as the best of them." He enlisted that July and stayed in the revolutionary army until hostilities ended in 1783. Martin fought under Washington, Lafayette, and Steuben. He took part in major battles in New York, Monmouth, and Yorktown. He wintered at Valley Forge and then at Morristown, considered even more severe. He wrote of his war years in a memoir that brings the American Revolution alive with telling details, drama, and a country boy's humor. Jim Murphy lets Joseph Plumb Martin speak for himself throughout the text, weaving in historical backfround details wherever necessary, giving voice to a teenager who was an eyewitness to the fight that set America free from the British Empire.
"Synopsis" by ,
Illustrated with archival photographs and drawings, this account reveals how this crushing evil was allowed to thrive.
"Synopsis" by , Boys, let us get up a club. With those words, six restless young men raided the linens at a friendand#8217;s mansion, pulled pillowcases over their heads, hopped on horses, and cavorted through the streets of Pulaski, Tennessee in 1866. The six friends named their club the Ku Klux Klan, and, all too quickly, their club grew into the self-proclaimed Invisible Empire with secret dens spread across the South. This is the story of how a secret terrorist group took root in Americaand#8217;s democracy. Filled with chilling and vivid personal accounts unearthed from oral histories, congressional documents, and diaries, this account from Newbery Honor-winning author Susan Campbell Bartoletti is a book to read and remember. A YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults Finalist.
"Synopsis" by ,

When this award-winning husband-and-wife team discovered that they each had sugar in their family history, they were inspired to trace the globe-spanning story of the sweet substance and to seek out the voices of those who led bitter sugar lives. The trail ran like a bright band from religious ceremonies in India to Europeand#8217;s Middle Ages, then on to Columbus, who brought the first cane cuttings to the Americas. Sugar was the substance that drove the bloody slave trade and caused the loss of countless lives but it also planted the seeds of revolution that led to freedom in the American colonies, Haiti, and France. With songs, oral histories, maps, and over 80 archival illustrations, here is the story of how one product allows us to see the grand currents of world history in new ways. Time line, source notes, bibliography, index.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.