Magnificent Marvel Supersale
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Visit our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Original Essays | April 6, 2015

    Mary Norris: IMG Voracious



    In the summer of 2012, I got a contract for a book about language, based on my experiences of more than 30 years as a copy editor at The New Yorker.... Continue »

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$12.50
List price: $17.99
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Local Warehouse Children's- Native American General

More copies of this ISBN

The Horse and the Plains Indians: A Powerful Partnership

by

The Horse and the Plains Indians: A Powerful Partnership Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Countless herds of majestic buffalo once roamed across the plains and prairies of North America. For at least 10,000 years, the native people hunted the buffalo and depended upon its meat and hide for their survival. But to the Indians, the buffalo was also considered sacred. They saw this abundant, powerful animal as another tribe, one that was closely related to them, and they treated it with great respect and admiration.

Here, an award-winning nonfiction team traces the history of this relationship, from its beginnings in prehistory to the present. Deftly weaving social history and science, Dorothy Hinshaw Patent discusses how European settlers slaughtered the buffalo almost to extinction, breaking the back of Indian cultures. And she shows how today, as Indians are reviving their cultures, they are also restoring buffalo herds to the land. Featuring William Munozand#8217;s stunning full-color photographs, supplemented with paintings by well-known artists, this book is an inspiring tale of a successful conservation effort. Authorand#8217;s note, suggestions for further reading, index.

Synopsis:

From the award-winning nonfiction team that brought you The Buffalo and the Indians comes a new companion work that tells of the transformative period in the early 16th century when the Spaniards introduced horses to the Great Plains, and how horses became, and remain, a key part of the Plains Indians' culture.

Synopsis:

In 1804 Meriwether Lewis and William Clark were sent by President Thomas Jefferson to explore the largely uncharted western territory of North America, and thus became critical figures in Americas expansion and major contributors to its scientific scholarship. They observed and documented scores of animals, including the Great Plains wolf, mule deer, prairie dogs, grizzly bears, and salmon. Several species and subspecies of mammals, birds, and fish previously unknown to science were recorded for the first time; the information gathered would serve as the basis of scientific study for years to come.

Collected here are stunning photographs by William Munoz that catalog the diverse array of wildlife witnessed by Lewis and Clark. Nature lovers and history buffs alike will be intrigued by this unusual account of the journey, whose bicentennial will soon be celebrated. Route maps, suggestions for further reading, chronology of animals sighted, index.

Synopsis:

Mustangs have thrived for thousands of generations. But now they are under attack from people who see them as pests. The lucky ones are adopted. Some are sent to long-term holding pens; more and more are sold for slaughter. But courageous young people are trying to stop the round-ups and the senseless killings. They are standing up to the government and big business to save these American icons. With eye witness accounts, cutting-edge science, and full-color photographs, Terri Farley and Melissa Farlow invite readers into the world of mustangs in all its beauty, and profile the young people leading the charge to keep horses wild and free. Includes notes and sources, index, and glossary.

Synopsis:

The image of a Native American on horseback has become ingrained in the American consciousness. But the Plains Indians and the horse were not always inseparable. Once, Native Americans used dogs to help carry their goods, and even after the Spaniards introduced the horse to the Americas, horses were considered so valuable that the Spanish would not allow the Indians to have them. But soon horses escaped from Spanish settlements, and Native Americans quickly learned how valuable the horse could be as a hunting mount, beast of burden, and military steed. Follow the story of this transformative partnership, starting in the early sixteenth century and continuing today.

About the Author

William Munoz has an avid interest in ecology and the environment and has taken the photographs for a number of books written by Dorothy Hinshaw Patent. Mr. Munoz lives in Hamilton, Montana.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780547125510
Subtitle:
Mustangs and the Young People Fighting to Save Them
Author:
Patent, Dorothy Hinshaw
Author:
Oz
Author:
Farlow, Melissa
Author:
oz, William
Author:
&
Author:
Munoz, William
Author:
Farley, Terri
Author:
Mu
Author:
William Muand#241
Author:
William Mu
Author:
Muand#241
Author:
ntilde
Publisher:
HMH Books for Young Readers
Subject:
Animals - Birds
Subject:
Rocks & Minerals
Subject:
Ethnic - Native American
Subject:
Exploration & Discovery
Subject:
Animals - General
Subject:
Children s Nonfiction-Animals
Subject:
Children s-People and Cultures
Subject:
Animals - Horses
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
20150922
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 3 up to 5
Language:
English
Illustrations:
full-color photographs
Pages:
208
Dimensions:
9 x 7 in 0.95 lb
Age Level:
from 7 up to 10

Related Subjects

Children's » Animals » General
Children's » History » United States » General
Children's » Native American » General
Children's » Nonfiction » Animals
Children's » Nonfiction » Native America
Children's » Nonfiction » US History
Children's » Nonfiction » World Cultures
Children's » People and Cultures

The Horse and the Plains Indians: A Powerful Partnership Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$12.50 In Stock
Product details 208 pages Clarion Books - English 9780547125510 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
From the award-winning nonfiction team that brought you The Buffalo and the Indians comes a new companion work that tells of the transformative period in the early 16th century when the Spaniards introduced horses to the Great Plains, and how horses became, and remain, a key part of the Plains Indians' culture.
"Synopsis" by ,
In 1804 Meriwether Lewis and William Clark were sent by President Thomas Jefferson to explore the largely uncharted western territory of North America, and thus became critical figures in Americas expansion and major contributors to its scientific scholarship. They observed and documented scores of animals, including the Great Plains wolf, mule deer, prairie dogs, grizzly bears, and salmon. Several species and subspecies of mammals, birds, and fish previously unknown to science were recorded for the first time; the information gathered would serve as the basis of scientific study for years to come.

Collected here are stunning photographs by William Munoz that catalog the diverse array of wildlife witnessed by Lewis and Clark. Nature lovers and history buffs alike will be intrigued by this unusual account of the journey, whose bicentennial will soon be celebrated. Route maps, suggestions for further reading, chronology of animals sighted, index.

"Synopsis" by ,
Mustangs have thrived for thousands of generations. But now they are under attack from people who see them as pests. The lucky ones are adopted. Some are sent to long-term holding pens; more and more are sold for slaughter. But courageous young people are trying to stop the round-ups and the senseless killings. They are standing up to the government and big business to save these American icons. With eye witness accounts, cutting-edge science, and full-color photographs, Terri Farley and Melissa Farlow invite readers into the world of mustangs in all its beauty, and profile the young people leading the charge to keep horses wild and free. Includes notes and sources, index, and glossary.
"Synopsis" by ,
The image of a Native American on horseback has become ingrained in the American consciousness. But the Plains Indians and the horse were not always inseparable. Once, Native Americans used dogs to help carry their goods, and even after the Spaniards introduced the horse to the Americas, horses were considered so valuable that the Spanish would not allow the Indians to have them. But soon horses escaped from Spanish settlements, and Native Americans quickly learned how valuable the horse could be as a hunting mount, beast of burden, and military steed. Follow the story of this transformative partnership, starting in the early sixteenth century and continuing today.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.