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House of Stone: A Memoir of Home, Family, and a Lost Middle East

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House of Stone: A Memoir of Home, Family, and a Lost Middle East Cover

ISBN13: 9780547134666
ISBN10: 0547134665
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In 2006, Shadid—an Arab-American raised in Oklahoma—was covering Israels attack on Lebanon when he heard that an Israeli rocket had crashed into the house his great-grandfather built—his familys ancestral home. Not long after, Shadid (who had covered three wars in the Middle East) realized that he had lost his passion for a region that had lost its soul. He had seen too much violence and death; his career had destroyed his marriage. Seeking renewal, he set out to rebuild the house that held his familys past in the town they had helped settle long ago. Although the course of the reconstruction is complicated by craftsmen with too much personality, squabbles with his extended family, and Lebanons political strife, Shadid is restored along with the house and finds that his understanding of the Middle East—which he had known chiefly in wartime—has been deepened by his immersion in smalltown life. Coming to terms with his familys emigrant experience and their towns history, the "homeless" Shadid finds home and comes to understand the emotions behind the turbulence of the Middle East. In a moving epilogue, Shadid describes returning to this house after a nearly disastrous week as a prisoner of war in Libya along with the first visit of his daughter. Combining the human interest of The Bookseller of Kabul and Three Cups of Tea with the light touch of an expert determined, first, to tell a story, Shadid tells the story of a reconstruction effort that would have sent Frances Mayes to a psychiatric hospital as he brings to life unforgettable characters who lives help explain not just the modern Middle East but the legacy of those who have survived generations of war. He flashes back to his familys loss of home, their suffering during their countrys dark days, and their experiences as newcomers in Oklahoma. This is a book about what propels the Middle East's rage—loss of home—and what it must examine and re-find—the sense of shared community. Far surpassing the usual reporters "tour of duty," books, House of Stone is more humane and compelling and will please students of the region, those whose families have emigrated from other nations, and all readers engaged by engrossing storytelling.

Review:

"Shadid — a New York Times correspondent, Pulitzer Prize winner, and grandson of immigrants — took a leave of absence to renovate his ancestral home in Lebanon. Shadid's 'quixotic mission' was a search for identity. His great-grandfather left the house to his family to 'join us with the past, to sustain us.' Shadid went in search of that past, claiming, 'I understood questions of identity, how being torn in two often leaves something less than one.' He writes sentimentally of Lebanon, but his confession that the house was 'memories of what I had imagined over many years' reveal a constructed emotion. The sentimentality sometimes borders on maudlin, and his identity quest is often lost among mundane construction details. Shadid claims to understand the 'desire of those whose place had been taken away.' He is presumably referring to his divorce, but his home renovation doesn't convince as healing process. History buffs, however, will appreciate the family and Middle Eastern historical asides." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

A compelling saga of redemption and renewal from two-time Pulitzer Prize-winner Anthony Shadid tells the story of rebuilding his family's ancestral home in Lebanon amid political strife, and his eventual understanding of the emotions behind the turbulence in the Middle East.

Synopsis:

A crowning achievement in the career of revered journalist Anthony Shadid—who died while on assignment in Syria in February 2012—House of Stone tells the story of rebuilding Shadid's ancestral home in Lebanon amid political strife.

Synopsis:

From the New York Times-bestselling author of The Places in Between, an exploration of the landscape of his home on the borderland between England and Scotland - known as the Marches — and the history, people, and conflicts that shape it

Synopsis:

The inspiring story of a young Armenian manandrsquo;s harrowing escape from the massacre of his people and of his granddaughterandrsquo;s quest to retrace his steps

Synopsis:

The inspiring story of a young Armenianandrsquo;s harrowing escape from genocide and of his granddaughterandrsquo;s quest to retrace his steps

Growing up, Dawn MacKeen heard fragments of her grandfather Stepanandrsquo;s story, of how he was swept up in the deadly mass deportation of Armenians during World War I and of how he miraculously managed to escape. Longing for a fuller picture of Stepanandrsquo;s lifeandmdash;and the lost home her family fledandmdash;Dawn travels alone to Turkey and Syria, across a landscape still rife with tension. Using his long-lost journals as a guide, she reconstructs her grandfatherand#39;s odyssey to the far reaches of the Ottoman Empire, where he found himself in the midst of unspeakable atrocities.and#160;

and#160;
Part reportage, part memoir, The Hundred-Year Walk alternates between Stepanandrsquo;s tale of resilience and Dawnandrsquo;s remarkable journey, giving us a rare firsthand account of the twentieth centuryandrsquo;s first genocide. Itandrsquo;s filled with edge-of-your-seat escapes and accounts of lifesaving kindnesses in the harsh desert. And itandrsquo;s in the desert that Dawn finds the unexpected: the secret to Stepanandrsquo;s survival.

Synopsis:

From the best-selling author of The Places in Between, “a flat-out masterpiece” (New York Times Book Review), an exploration of the Marches—the borderland between England and Scotland—and the people, history, and conflicts that have shaped it

In The Places in Between Rory Stewart walked through the most dangerous borderlands in the world. Now he walks along the border he calls home—where political turmoil and vivid lives have played out for centuries across a magnificent natural landscape—to tell the story of the Marches.

In his thousand-mile journey, Stewart sleeps on mountain ridges and in housing estates, in hostels and in farmhouses. Following lines of ancient neolithic standing stones, wading through floods and ruined fields, he walks Hadrian’s Wall with soldiers who have fought in Afghanistan, and visits the Buddhist monks who outnumber Christian monks in the Scottish countryside today. He melds the stories of the people he meets with the region’s political and economic history, tracing the creation of Scotland from ancient tribes to the independence referendum. And he discovers another country buried in history, a vanished Middleland: the lost kingdom of Cumbria.

With every step, Stewart reveals the force of myths and traditions and the endurance of ties that are woven into the fabric of the land itself. A meditation on deep history, the pull of national identity, and home, The Marches is a transporting work from a powerful and original writer.

About the Author

Anthony Shadid, an unparalleled chronicler of the human stories behind the news, gained attention and awards, including the Pulitzer, for his front-page reports in the Washington Post from Iraq there. He was the only American reporter in Iraq who spoke Arabic. Currently he is Senior Middle East correspondent for the New York Times. He recently earned his second Pulitzer. He lives in Boston and Beirut but was raised in Oklahoma City.

Table of Contents

Introduction: Bayt xiii

PART ONE: RETURNING

1. What the Silence Knows, July 30, 2006 3

2. Little Olive, August 10, 2007 14

3. Three Birds 35

4. Our Last Gentleman 49

5. Gold 65

6. Early Harvest 77

7. Dont Tell the Neighbors 88

8. Abu Jean, Does This Please You? 99

9. Mr. Chaya Appears 112

10. Last Whispers 128

11. Khairallas Oud 142

12. Citadels 155

PART TWO: AT HOME

13. Homesick 171

14. A Bush Called Rozana 181

15. Stupid Cat 197

16. Sitara 205

17. Salted Miqta 216

18. Passing Danger 232

19. Home 240

20. Worse Times 249

21. In the Name of the Father 259

22. Coming Home 269

23. Oh Laila 278

24. My Jedeida 286

Epilogue 303

Note to Readers 309

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

jlamf, January 20, 2013 (view all comments by jlamf)
In rebuilding his family house, Shadid searches for his roots in the land of his father, yet the Lebanon of then no longer exists. But the people, they exist. At times this memoir is reminiscent of "A Year in Provence", more bittersweet, but revealing of an essence of the Middle East.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
Lindsay Waite, August 13, 2012 (view all comments by Lindsay Waite)
In 2011, Anthony Shaddad, a New York Times reporter, was captured in Libya. He was beaten and his interpreter was killed. When he was freed, he headed to his ancestral home in Marjayoun, Lebanon. He had been working on renovating his great grandfather's home, and wanted to complete the work. "House of Stone" is the story of his efforts, and blended in this story of reconstruction are reflections on his family, his country, his neighbors, and the Middle East. Reading this poignant memoir, filled with hope about this house of stone, is particularly sad since Shaddad died in Feb 2012 while in Syria (of acute asthma). His death is a loss to his family, his country and the world.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
View all 2 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780547134666
Author:
Shadid, Anthony
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin
Author:
STEWART, RORY
Author:
MacKeen, Dawn Anahid
Subject:
Biography - General
Subject:
Middle East - General
Subject:
Europe - Great Britain
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
20120331
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from 9
Language:
English
Illustrations:
8-pp bandw insert
Pages:
320
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 1 lb
Age Level:
from 14

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Related Subjects


Biography » General
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Health and Self-Help » Child Care and Parenting » General
History and Social Science » Current Affairs » General
History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Immigration
History and Social Science » Middle East » Lebanon
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » General
History and Social Science » World History » Middle East
Travel » Middle East

House of Stone: A Memoir of Home, Family, and a Lost Middle East Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$12.50 In Stock
Product details 320 pages Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (HMH) - English 9780547134666 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Shadid — a New York Times correspondent, Pulitzer Prize winner, and grandson of immigrants — took a leave of absence to renovate his ancestral home in Lebanon. Shadid's 'quixotic mission' was a search for identity. His great-grandfather left the house to his family to 'join us with the past, to sustain us.' Shadid went in search of that past, claiming, 'I understood questions of identity, how being torn in two often leaves something less than one.' He writes sentimentally of Lebanon, but his confession that the house was 'memories of what I had imagined over many years' reveal a constructed emotion. The sentimentality sometimes borders on maudlin, and his identity quest is often lost among mundane construction details. Shadid claims to understand the 'desire of those whose place had been taken away.' He is presumably referring to his divorce, but his home renovation doesn't convince as healing process. History buffs, however, will appreciate the family and Middle Eastern historical asides." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , A compelling saga of redemption and renewal from two-time Pulitzer Prize-winner Anthony Shadid tells the story of rebuilding his family's ancestral home in Lebanon amid political strife, and his eventual understanding of the emotions behind the turbulence in the Middle East.
"Synopsis" by , A crowning achievement in the career of revered journalist Anthony Shadid—who died while on assignment in Syria in February 2012—House of Stone tells the story of rebuilding Shadid's ancestral home in Lebanon amid political strife.
"Synopsis" by , From the New York Times-bestselling author of The Places in Between, an exploration of the landscape of his home on the borderland between England and Scotland - known as the Marches — and the history, people, and conflicts that shape it
"Synopsis" by ,
The inspiring story of a young Armenian manandrsquo;s harrowing escape from the massacre of his people and of his granddaughterandrsquo;s quest to retrace his steps
"Synopsis" by ,
The inspiring story of a young Armenianandrsquo;s harrowing escape from genocide and of his granddaughterandrsquo;s quest to retrace his steps

Growing up, Dawn MacKeen heard fragments of her grandfather Stepanandrsquo;s story, of how he was swept up in the deadly mass deportation of Armenians during World War I and of how he miraculously managed to escape. Longing for a fuller picture of Stepanandrsquo;s lifeandmdash;and the lost home her family fledandmdash;Dawn travels alone to Turkey and Syria, across a landscape still rife with tension. Using his long-lost journals as a guide, she reconstructs her grandfatherand#39;s odyssey to the far reaches of the Ottoman Empire, where he found himself in the midst of unspeakable atrocities.and#160;

and#160;
Part reportage, part memoir, The Hundred-Year Walk alternates between Stepanandrsquo;s tale of resilience and Dawnandrsquo;s remarkable journey, giving us a rare firsthand account of the twentieth centuryandrsquo;s first genocide. Itandrsquo;s filled with edge-of-your-seat escapes and accounts of lifesaving kindnesses in the harsh desert. And itandrsquo;s in the desert that Dawn finds the unexpected: the secret to Stepanandrsquo;s survival.

"Synopsis" by ,
From the best-selling author of The Places in Between, “a flat-out masterpiece” (New York Times Book Review), an exploration of the Marches—the borderland between England and Scotland—and the people, history, and conflicts that have shaped it

In The Places in Between Rory Stewart walked through the most dangerous borderlands in the world. Now he walks along the border he calls home—where political turmoil and vivid lives have played out for centuries across a magnificent natural landscape—to tell the story of the Marches.

In his thousand-mile journey, Stewart sleeps on mountain ridges and in housing estates, in hostels and in farmhouses. Following lines of ancient neolithic standing stones, wading through floods and ruined fields, he walks Hadrian’s Wall with soldiers who have fought in Afghanistan, and visits the Buddhist monks who outnumber Christian monks in the Scottish countryside today. He melds the stories of the people he meets with the region’s political and economic history, tracing the creation of Scotland from ancient tribes to the independence referendum. And he discovers another country buried in history, a vanished Middleland: the lost kingdom of Cumbria.

With every step, Stewart reveals the force of myths and traditions and the endurance of ties that are woven into the fabric of the land itself. A meditation on deep history, the pull of national identity, and home, The Marches is a transporting work from a powerful and original writer.

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