The Fictioning Horror Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Powell's Q&A | September 3, 2014

Emily St. John Mandel: IMG Powell’s Q&A: Emily St. John Mandel



Describe your latest book. My new novel is called Station Eleven. It's about a traveling Shakespearean theatre company in a post-apocalyptic North... Continue »
  1. $17.47 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    Station Eleven

    Emily St. John Mandel 9780385353304

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$4.95
List price: $13.95
Used Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Hawthorne Literature- A to Z

Dear American Airlines

by

Dear American Airlines Cover

ISBN13: 9780547237909
ISBN10: 0547237901
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $4.95!

 

Staff Pick

Creatively constructed, this novel-in-a-letter has more to do with the main character's complaints about his own life than his missed flight. Dear American Airlines, the first novel by the New York Times cocktail columnist Jonathan Miles was surely written while sitting in an airport bar. If you are flying anywhere this holiday season, arrive at the airport early — and pack this book.
Recommended by Carson, Powells.com

For a tiny little book, this sure packed a big wallop. I expected humor and angst (which it had), but I sure didn't expect a poignant and beautiful little study on the meaning of life and, surprisingly, suicide. While Bennie, an alcoholic, washed-up poet, is desperately trying to get to his daughter's wedding, he writes a rambling, scathing letter to American Airlines detailing his frustration at his delayed flight. Blistering humor and some pretty fabulous literary linguistics follow. But, it's the secondary plot line that tears pretty quickly at your heart. Bennie is translating a Polish novel about a wounded war veteran. He inserts pieces of this novel into his tome to AA (and no, that acronym is not lost on Bennie). It is an amazingly tender and haunting story.  It's hard to even reconcile that the two stories are from the same writer. I'm now thoroughly intrigued about Jonathan Miles and must seek out more!
Recommended by Dianah, Powells.com

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Bennie Ford, a fifty-three-year-old failed poet turned translator, is traveling to his estranged daughters wedding when his flight is canceled. Stuck with thousands of fuming passengers in the purgatory of O'Hare International Airport, he watches the clock tick and realizes that he will miss the ceremony. Frustrated, irate, and helpless, Bennie does the only thing he can: he starts to write a letter. But what begins as a hilariously excoriating demand for a refund soon becomes a lament for a life gone awry, for years misspent, talent wasted, and happiness lost. Bennie's writing is infused with a sense of remorse for the actions of a lifetime — and made all the more urgent by the fading hope that if he can just make it to the wedding, he might have a chance to do something right.

A margarita blend of outrage, humor, vulnerability, intelligence, and regret, Dear American Airlines gives new meaning to the term "airport novel" and announces the emergence of a major new talent in American fiction.

Review:

"This crisp yowl of a first novel from Miles, who covers books for Men's Journal and cocktails for the New York Times, finds despairing yet effusive litterateur Benjamin Ford midair in midlife crisis. Bennie is en route from New York, where he shares a cramped apartment with his stroke-disabled mother and her caretaker, to L.A., where he will attend his daughter Stella's wedding. He gets stranded at O'Hare when his connecting flight — along with all others — is unaccountably canceled. In the long, empty hours amid a marooned crowd, Bennie's demand for a refund quickly becomes a scathing yet oddly joyful reflection on his difficult life, and on the Polish novel he is translating. Bennie writes lightly of his 'dark years' of drinking, of his failed marriages, about his mother's descent into suicidal madness and about her marriage to Bennie's father, a survivor of a Nazi labor camp. Bennie's father recited Polish poetry for solace during Bennie's childhood, inadvertently setting Bennie's life course; Bennie's command of language as he describes his fellow strandees and his riotous embrace of his own feelings will have readers rooting for him. By the time flights resume, Miles has masterfully taken Bennie from grim resignation to the dazzling exhilaration of the possible. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"One of the many pleasures of Dear American Airlines is watching Benjamin's and Walenty's stories finally dovetail in a way that's not just philosophically but emotionally rewarding. Ah, but the digressions! Not every reader will love them as I did." Richard Russo, New York Times

Review:

"Mr. Miles is a superb writer and learned, too. Allusions, literary and otherwise, abound." Dallas Morning News

Review:

"This is writing that pulls no punches....It's also very funny." Los Angeles Times

Review:

"Miles has done a beautiful job of moderating Benny's riffs and rants, so that we get to know him gradually, circularly, as one might do a loquacious town crank who tells good stories." Boston Globe

Review:

"Turn to nearly any page and you'll find a funny, smart, touching, wonderfully caustic or well-turned sentence or paragraph." Chicago Tribune

Synopsis:

From the cocktails columnist at the The New York Times comes the scathingly funny, deeply moving story of a stranded airline passenger, whose enraged letter of complaint transforms into a lament for a life gone awry.

Synopsis:

“Why are you so unhappy?” Thats the question that Zeke Pappas, a thirty-three-year-old scholar, asks almost everybody he meets as part of an obsessive project, “The Inventory of American Unhappiness.” The answers he receivesa mix of true sadness and absurd complaintcreate a collage of woe. Zeke, meanwhile, remains delightfully oblivious to the increasingly harsh realities that threaten his daily routine, opting instead to focus his energy on finding the perfect mate so that he can gain custody of his orphaned nieces. Following steps outlined in a womens magazine, the ever-optimistic Zeke identifies some “prospects”: a newly divorced neighbor, a coffeehouse barista, his administrative assistant, and Sofia Coppola (“Why not aim high?”). 

A clairvoyant when it comes to the Starbucks orders of strangers, a quixotic renegade when it comes to the federal bureaucracy, and a devoted believer in the afternoon cocktail and the evening binge, Zeke has an irreverent voice that is a marvel of lacerating wit and heart-on-sleeve emotion, underscored by a creeping paranoia and made more urgent by the hope that if he can only find a wife, he might have a second chance at life.

About the Author

Jonathon Miles is the cocktails columnist for the New York Times. His journalism, essays, and literary criticism have appeared in many publications, including the New York Times Book Review, GQ, the New York Observer, and the Oxford American. A former longtime resident of Oxford, Mississippi, he lives in New York.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

carriewriter, September 11, 2011 (view all comments by carriewriter)
I'm reading this now and really enjoying it. I love the framework of the narrator being stuck in an airport and using that as a platform to expand on his life and relationships -kind of like "Up in the Air" without the flying part. I'm curious to learn more about Jonathan Miles and what he's planning next.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9780547237909
Author:
Miles, Jonathan
Publisher:
Mariner Books
Author:
Bakopoulos, Dean
Subject:
Non-Classifiable
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
General
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Publication Date:
20090631
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
One halftone
Pages:
192
Dimensions:
9.00 x 6.00 in

Other books you might like

  1. Chasing Harry Winston Sale Hardcover $1.00
  2. Eat, Pray, Love: One Woman's Search...
    Used Trade Paper $3.95
  3. Only Love Can Break Your Heart Used Hardcover $9.95
  4. The Runner: A True Account of the...
    Sale Trade Paper $10.50
  5. Beautiful Children: A Novel
    Used Hardcover $3.50
  6. Out Stealing Horses
    Used Trade Paper $3.50

Related Subjects


Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » Featured Titles
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » Sale Books

Dear American Airlines Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$4.95 In Stock
Product details 192 pages Mariner Books - English 9780547237909 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

Creatively constructed, this novel-in-a-letter has more to do with the main character's complaints about his own life than his missed flight. Dear American Airlines, the first novel by the New York Times cocktail columnist Jonathan Miles was surely written while sitting in an airport bar. If you are flying anywhere this holiday season, arrive at the airport early — and pack this book.

"Staff Pick" by ,

For a tiny little book, this sure packed a big wallop. I expected humor and angst (which it had), but I sure didn't expect a poignant and beautiful little study on the meaning of life and, surprisingly, suicide. While Bennie, an alcoholic, washed-up poet, is desperately trying to get to his daughter's wedding, he writes a rambling, scathing letter to American Airlines detailing his frustration at his delayed flight. Blistering humor and some pretty fabulous literary linguistics follow. But, it's the secondary plot line that tears pretty quickly at your heart. Bennie is translating a Polish novel about a wounded war veteran. He inserts pieces of this novel into his tome to AA (and no, that acronym is not lost on Bennie). It is an amazingly tender and haunting story.  It's hard to even reconcile that the two stories are from the same writer. I'm now thoroughly intrigued about Jonathan Miles and must seek out more!

"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "This crisp yowl of a first novel from Miles, who covers books for Men's Journal and cocktails for the New York Times, finds despairing yet effusive litterateur Benjamin Ford midair in midlife crisis. Bennie is en route from New York, where he shares a cramped apartment with his stroke-disabled mother and her caretaker, to L.A., where he will attend his daughter Stella's wedding. He gets stranded at O'Hare when his connecting flight — along with all others — is unaccountably canceled. In the long, empty hours amid a marooned crowd, Bennie's demand for a refund quickly becomes a scathing yet oddly joyful reflection on his difficult life, and on the Polish novel he is translating. Bennie writes lightly of his 'dark years' of drinking, of his failed marriages, about his mother's descent into suicidal madness and about her marriage to Bennie's father, a survivor of a Nazi labor camp. Bennie's father recited Polish poetry for solace during Bennie's childhood, inadvertently setting Bennie's life course; Bennie's command of language as he describes his fellow strandees and his riotous embrace of his own feelings will have readers rooting for him. By the time flights resume, Miles has masterfully taken Bennie from grim resignation to the dazzling exhilaration of the possible. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "One of the many pleasures of Dear American Airlines is watching Benjamin's and Walenty's stories finally dovetail in a way that's not just philosophically but emotionally rewarding. Ah, but the digressions! Not every reader will love them as I did."
"Review" by , "Mr. Miles is a superb writer and learned, too. Allusions, literary and otherwise, abound."
"Review" by , "This is writing that pulls no punches....It's also very funny."
"Review" by , "Miles has done a beautiful job of moderating Benny's riffs and rants, so that we get to know him gradually, circularly, as one might do a loquacious town crank who tells good stories."
"Review" by , "Turn to nearly any page and you'll find a funny, smart, touching, wonderfully caustic or well-turned sentence or paragraph."
"Synopsis" by , From the cocktails columnist at the The New York Times comes the scathingly funny, deeply moving story of a stranded airline passenger, whose enraged letter of complaint transforms into a lament for a life gone awry.
"Synopsis" by , “Why are you so unhappy?” Thats the question that Zeke Pappas, a thirty-three-year-old scholar, asks almost everybody he meets as part of an obsessive project, “The Inventory of American Unhappiness.” The answers he receivesa mix of true sadness and absurd complaintcreate a collage of woe. Zeke, meanwhile, remains delightfully oblivious to the increasingly harsh realities that threaten his daily routine, opting instead to focus his energy on finding the perfect mate so that he can gain custody of his orphaned nieces. Following steps outlined in a womens magazine, the ever-optimistic Zeke identifies some “prospects”: a newly divorced neighbor, a coffeehouse barista, his administrative assistant, and Sofia Coppola (“Why not aim high?”). 

A clairvoyant when it comes to the Starbucks orders of strangers, a quixotic renegade when it comes to the federal bureaucracy, and a devoted believer in the afternoon cocktail and the evening binge, Zeke has an irreverent voice that is a marvel of lacerating wit and heart-on-sleeve emotion, underscored by a creeping paranoia and made more urgent by the hope that if he can only find a wife, he might have a second chance at life.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.