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The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrun

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The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrun Cover

ISBN13: 9780547273426
ISBN10: 0547273428
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Staff Pick

Tolkien fans don't need to be told that a new, previously unpublished work by The Master is a major event. The surprise here is that Tolkien narrates Norse mythology with the same energy, wit, and excitement with which he brings hobbits to life.
Recommended by Rico, Powells.com

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrún is a previously unpublished work by J.R.R. Tolkien, written while Tolkien was Professor of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford during the 1920s and '30s, before he wrote The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings.

It makes available for the first time Tolkien's extensive retelling in English narrative verse of the epic Norse tales of "Sigurd the Völsung" and "The Fall of the Niflungs." It includes an introduction by J. R. R. Tolkien, drawn from one of his own lectures on Norse literature, with commentary and notes on the poems by Christopher Tolkien.

Review:

In his classic essay "On Fairy-Stories," J.R.R. Tolkien wrote of his childhood reading experiences that "best of all (was) the nameless North of Sigurd of the Volsungs, and the prince of all dragons. Such lands were pre-eminently desirable. ... The world that contained even the imagination of Fafnir was richer and more beautiful, at whatever cost of peril." Tolkien's friend C.S. Lewis was likewise... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Review:

"A former lecturer in English at Oxford and editor of the many posthumously published volumes of his father's work, Christopher Tolkien brings a scholar's eye for nuance and interpretation to this dense yet fascinating volume." Elizabeth Hand, The Washington Post

Synopsis:

This previously unpublished work by Tolkien, written during the 1920s and '30s, makes available the author's extensive retelling in English narrative verse of the epic Norse tales of "Sigurd the Volsung" and "The Fall of the Niflungs."

Synopsis:

The translation of Beowulf by J.R.R. Tolkien was an early work, very distinctive in its mode, completed in 1926: he returned to it later to make hasty corrections, but seems never to have considered its publication. This edition is twofold, for there exists an illuminating commentary on the text of the poem by the translator himself, in the written form of a series of lectures given at Oxford in the 1930s; and from these lectures a substantial selection has been made, to form also a commentary on the translation in this book. From his creative attention to detail in these lectures there arises a sense of the immediacy and clarity of his vision. It is as if he entered into the imagined past: standing beside Beowulf and his men shaking out their mail-shirts as they beached their ship on the coast of Denmark, listening to the rising anger of Beowulf at the taunting of Unferth, or looking up in amazement at Grendels terrible hand set under the roof of Heorot. But the commentary in this book includes also much from those lectures in which, while always anchored in the text, he expressed his wider perceptions. He looks closely at the dragon that would slay Beowulf "snuffling in baffled rage and injured greed when he discovers the theft of the cup"; but he rebuts the notion that this is "a mere treasure story", "just another dragon tale". He turns to the lines that tell of the burying of the golden things long ago, and observes that it is "the feeling for the treasure itself, this sad history" that raises it to another level. "The whole thing is sombre, tragic, sinister, curiously real. The ‘treasure is not just some lucky wealth that will enable the finder to have a good time, or marry the princess. It is laden with history, leading back into the dark heathen ages beyond the memory of song, but not beyond the reach of imagination." Sellic spell, a "marvellous tale", is a story written by Tolkien suggesting what might have been the form and style of an Old English folk-tale of Beowulf, in which there was no association with the "historical legends" of the Northern kingdoms.

Synopsis:

Many years ago, J.R.R. Tolkien composed his own version of the great legend of Northern antiquity, recounted here in The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrún.
 
In the Lay of the Völsungs is told the ancestry of the great hero Sigurd, the slayer of Fáfnir, most celebrated of dragons; of his awakening of the Valkyrie Brynhild, who slept surrounded by a wall of fire, and of their betrothal; and of his coming to the court of the great princes who were named the Niflungs (or Nibelungs), with whom he entered into blood-brotherhood.
 
In scenes of dramatic intensity, of confusion of identity, thwarted passion, jealousy, and bitter strife, the tragedy of Sigurd and Brynhild, of Gunnar the Niflung and Gudrún his sister, mounts to its end in the murder of Sigurd, the suicide of Brynhild, and the despair of Gudrún.
 
The Lay of Gudrún recounts her fate after the death of Sigurd, her marriage against her will to the mighty Atli, ruler of the Huns (the Attila of history), his murder of her brothers, and her hideous revenge.

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About the Author

J.R.R. Tolkien (1892–1973) is the creator of Middle-Earth and author of such classic and extraordinary works of fiction as The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, The Silmarillion, and The Children of Hurin. His books have been translated into more than forty languages and have sold many millions of copies worldwide.

Christopher Tolkien is the third son of J. R. R. Tolkien. Appointed by Tolkien to be his literary executor, he has devoted himself to the editing and publication of unpublished writings, notably The Silmarillion, Unfinished Tales, The History of Middle-Earth, and The Children of Hurin.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

fafnir, May 7, 2009 (view all comments by fafnir)
For any true Tolkien fan, you must read this book to find the beginnings of the Mythology of Middle-Earth. I found the academic level hard to digest and the poetic format difficult to follow. Once you get the rythm of the poetics and immerse yourself in Norse mythology, you really can find answers to where Middle-Earth came from. A must read for anyone who has read the Appendices and the Simillarion.
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(10 of 11 readers found this comment helpful)
Jorge, April 13, 2009 (view all comments by Jorge)
I have rated this book without even reading it yet. I am so excited about this book being released. I have read almost everything Tolkien has written. I have tried several other authors, but none have had his ability to make you feel that you were truly there with the characters in the story. I have preordered this book and plan on reading it the day it comes in. Thanks you for releaseing this previously unreleased work.

Trust me this book will be well worth the read!
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(3 of 17 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 2 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780547273426
Author:
Tolkien, J. R. R.
Publisher:
Mariner Books
Editor:
Tolkien, Christopher
Author:
Tolkien, J.R.R.
Author:
Tolkien, Christopher
Subject:
Fantasy poetry.
Subject:
Fantasy - General
Subject:
Fairy Tales, Folklore & Mythology
Subject:
Legends
Subject:
Mythology, norse
Subject:
Fairy Tales, Folk Tales, Legends & Mythology
Subject:
Epic
Subject:
English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh
Subject:
General-General
Subject:
Fantasy - Epic
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20100910
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
384
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.50 in

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The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrun Used Hardcover
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$8.50 In Stock
Product details 384 pages Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (HMH) - English 9780547273426 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

Tolkien fans don't need to be told that a new, previously unpublished work by The Master is a major event. The surprise here is that Tolkien narrates Norse mythology with the same energy, wit, and excitement with which he brings hobbits to life.

"Review" by , "A former lecturer in English at Oxford and editor of the many posthumously published volumes of his father's work, Christopher Tolkien brings a scholar's eye for nuance and interpretation to this dense yet fascinating volume."
"Synopsis" by , This previously unpublished work by Tolkien, written during the 1920s and '30s, makes available the author's extensive retelling in English narrative verse of the epic Norse tales of "Sigurd the Volsung" and "The Fall of the Niflungs."
"Synopsis" by ,
The translation of Beowulf by J.R.R. Tolkien was an early work, very distinctive in its mode, completed in 1926: he returned to it later to make hasty corrections, but seems never to have considered its publication. This edition is twofold, for there exists an illuminating commentary on the text of the poem by the translator himself, in the written form of a series of lectures given at Oxford in the 1930s; and from these lectures a substantial selection has been made, to form also a commentary on the translation in this book. From his creative attention to detail in these lectures there arises a sense of the immediacy and clarity of his vision. It is as if he entered into the imagined past: standing beside Beowulf and his men shaking out their mail-shirts as they beached their ship on the coast of Denmark, listening to the rising anger of Beowulf at the taunting of Unferth, or looking up in amazement at Grendels terrible hand set under the roof of Heorot. But the commentary in this book includes also much from those lectures in which, while always anchored in the text, he expressed his wider perceptions. He looks closely at the dragon that would slay Beowulf "snuffling in baffled rage and injured greed when he discovers the theft of the cup"; but he rebuts the notion that this is "a mere treasure story", "just another dragon tale". He turns to the lines that tell of the burying of the golden things long ago, and observes that it is "the feeling for the treasure itself, this sad history" that raises it to another level. "The whole thing is sombre, tragic, sinister, curiously real. The ‘treasure is not just some lucky wealth that will enable the finder to have a good time, or marry the princess. It is laden with history, leading back into the dark heathen ages beyond the memory of song, but not beyond the reach of imagination." Sellic spell, a "marvellous tale", is a story written by Tolkien suggesting what might have been the form and style of an Old English folk-tale of Beowulf, in which there was no association with the "historical legends" of the Northern kingdoms.
"Synopsis" by ,
Many years ago, J.R.R. Tolkien composed his own version of the great legend of Northern antiquity, recounted here in The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrún.
 
In the Lay of the Völsungs is told the ancestry of the great hero Sigurd, the slayer of Fáfnir, most celebrated of dragons; of his awakening of the Valkyrie Brynhild, who slept surrounded by a wall of fire, and of their betrothal; and of his coming to the court of the great princes who were named the Niflungs (or Nibelungs), with whom he entered into blood-brotherhood.
 
In scenes of dramatic intensity, of confusion of identity, thwarted passion, jealousy, and bitter strife, the tragedy of Sigurd and Brynhild, of Gunnar the Niflung and Gudrún his sister, mounts to its end in the murder of Sigurd, the suicide of Brynhild, and the despair of Gudrún.
 
The Lay of Gudrún recounts her fate after the death of Sigurd, her marriage against her will to the mighty Atli, ruler of the Huns (the Attila of history), his murder of her brothers, and her hideous revenge.
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