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A Voice from Old New York: A Memoir of My Youth

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A Voice from Old New York: A Memoir of My Youth Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

At the time of his death, Louis Auchincloss—enemy of bores, self-pity, and gossip less than fresh—had just finished taking on a subject he had long avoided: himself. His memoir confirms that, despite the spark of his fiction, Auchincloss himself was the most entertaining character he has created. No traitor to his class but occasionally its critic, he returns us to his Society which was, he maintains, less interesting than its members admitted. You may differ as he unfurls his life with dignity, summoning his family (particularly his father who suffered from depression and forgave him for hating sports) and intimates. Brooke Astor and her circle are here, along with glimpses of Jacqueline Onassis. Most memorable, though, is his way with those outside the salon: the cranky maid; the maiden aunt, perpetually out of place; the less-than-well-born boy who threw himself from a window over a woman and a man. Here is Auchincloss, an American master, being Auchincloss, a rare eye, a generous and lively spirit to the end.

 

 

Review:

"Auchincloss, who had offered glimpses of his own life in the pages of his massive body of work, posthumously opens a window into his formative years in this graceful and entertaining memoir of his life from childhood through the early years of his marriage to the death of his mother. With wry humor he admits that he was unprepared for life at the Groton School; he was not athletic and avoided sports, and he made poor choices of friends--all of which made his first two years at the school a miserable experience. He recalls the moment when he decided to become a novelist; in his French course during his sophomore year at Yale, Auchincloss was 'electrified' by Madame Bovary and The Red and the Black, and, as a result, he sat down and wrote and completed his own novel in a matter of a few months. Although the novel was rejected by Scribner's, Auchincloss had found his destiny. He recalls his working relationships with John Foster Dulles and brother Allen, during his early years as a lawyer, as well as his relationship with Jackie Onassis, then an editor at Doubleday. Above all in this excellent memoir, Auchincloss leaves readers with an observation that sums up his own life and work: 'Society matters not so much. Words are everything.' (Jan.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)

Synopsis:

At the time of his death, Auchincloss had just finished taking on a subject he had long avoided: "himself. His memoir confirms that, despite the spark of his fiction, Auchincloss himself was the most entertaining character he has created.

Synopsis:

The last book from the late, beloved Louis Auchincloss—a moving but witty memoir that details his remarkable life and recreates Society with charm and a stylish bite.

About the Author

Louis Auchincloss was honored in the year 2000 as a “Living Landmark” by the New York Landmarks Conservancy. During his long career he wrote more than sixty books, including the story collection Manhattan Monologues and the novel The Rector of Justin. The former president of the Academy of Arts and Letters, he resided in New York City until his death in January 2010.

Table of Contents

CONTENTS

Introduction: Turning Back ix

Part I: How It Was

 1 | Genealogy, et cetera 3

 2 | John and Priscilla 9

 3 | What Some Call “Society” 17

 4 | A Few Words About Women 27

Part II: Education and After

 5 | Teachers, Beloved and Otherwise 39

 6 | My Life in Crime 47

 7 | Bar Harbor 55

 8 | Bad Sports 61

 9 | Religion 73

10 | The Great Depression 79

11 | The Brits 85

12 | Cohorts 91

13 | A Hang-up 97

14 | I Begin to Write 107

15 | Sea Duty 113

16 | Fear 117

17 | A Return to Society 123

18 | The Firm 129

19 | Fleeing the Law 141

20 | A Few More Words About Women 147

21 | Animal Encounters 155

Part III: The Writing Life

22 | Writerly Types 163

23 | Class 169

24 | Burdens 175

25 | A Would-be Writer, Not Forgotten 181

Part IV: Farewells

26 | My Mother 187

27 | And Please Do Not Forget 195

Epilogue: Words 201

 

Product Details

ISBN:
9780547341538
Author:
Auchincloss, Louis
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (HMH)
Author:
Auchincloss, Louis
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
Biography-Literary
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
20101231
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
224
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in 0.74 lb

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Related Subjects

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Biography » Literary
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
History and Social Science » World History » General

A Voice from Old New York: A Memoir of My Youth Used Hardcover
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Product details 224 pages Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (HMH) - English 9780547341538 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Auchincloss, who had offered glimpses of his own life in the pages of his massive body of work, posthumously opens a window into his formative years in this graceful and entertaining memoir of his life from childhood through the early years of his marriage to the death of his mother. With wry humor he admits that he was unprepared for life at the Groton School; he was not athletic and avoided sports, and he made poor choices of friends--all of which made his first two years at the school a miserable experience. He recalls the moment when he decided to become a novelist; in his French course during his sophomore year at Yale, Auchincloss was 'electrified' by Madame Bovary and The Red and the Black, and, as a result, he sat down and wrote and completed his own novel in a matter of a few months. Although the novel was rejected by Scribner's, Auchincloss had found his destiny. He recalls his working relationships with John Foster Dulles and brother Allen, during his early years as a lawyer, as well as his relationship with Jackie Onassis, then an editor at Doubleday. Above all in this excellent memoir, Auchincloss leaves readers with an observation that sums up his own life and work: 'Society matters not so much. Words are everything.' (Jan.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)
"Synopsis" by , At the time of his death, Auchincloss had just finished taking on a subject he had long avoided: "himself. His memoir confirms that, despite the spark of his fiction, Auchincloss himself was the most entertaining character he has created.
"Synopsis" by ,
The last book from the late, beloved Louis Auchincloss—a moving but witty memoir that details his remarkable life and recreates Society with charm and a stylish bite.
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