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Ballywhinney Girl

by

Ballywhinney Girl Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A body? Buried in the bog where Grandpa was digging peat for the fire? Maeve is scared--and excited, too. Who is he, and how long has he been lying there? The police come, the villagers gather, and then the archaeologists arrive.It's not a he, it's a she, say the scientists, and she has been preserved in the bog soil for a thousand years! They take the mummified body away to study and to show in the museum. This girl from a thousand years ago--"a girl like me, maybe"--was partly Maeve's discovery, and Maeve feels a strong connection to this unknown being from the past. If that girl could choose, would she like being displayed in a glass case? Or would she miss the green meadow where she had lain undisturbed for so many hundred years? Numerous mummies have been discovered in Ireland's bogs, and Eve Bunting has captured the layers of thought and feeling that a child would experience, faced with such an awe-inspiring and mysterious discovery.

Review:

"In a haunting outing that treads on perhaps even more chilling turf than Bunting and McCully's previous collaboration, The Banshee (2009), the author whisks readers to the expansive countryside of her native Ireland. It's there, in a peat bog, that young Maeve and her grandfather make a startling discovery: the ancient mummified remains of a girl. Drama and suspense dovetail as the family and authorities follow procedures and come to grips with the significance of what they've found. 'I wasn't sure exactly how I felt,' Maeve thinks. 'There was fear/ and curiosity,/ but there was more./ Something I could not/ put my name to.' McCully's watercolor-and-ink compositions offer a front-row seat to the proceedings, though readers get just a few glimpses of the mummy. Maeve's delicately drawn face tells a tale all its own, filled with shock, concern, and sadness as she explores the connection she feels to the mummified girl. Though not for sensitive children, this memento mori has much to offer readers who are up to the challenge. An afterword provides information on the (fictional) story's real-life inspiration. Ages 4 — 8." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

A young girl witnesses the discovery of the mummified body of another girl in an Irish bog and feels a strong connection to this unknown being from the past.

Synopsis:

After the police come, a family is forced to flee their Caribbean island and set sail for America in a small fishing boat.

Synopsis:

A homeless boy who lives in an airport with his father, moving from terminal to terminal trying not to be noticed, is given hope when a trapped bird finally finds its freedom.

Synopsis:

Anna and Grandma are planning a surprise for Dad's birthday. Dad thinks he has received all his presents, but Grandma stands up and gives him the best one of all: she reads aloud the stories that Anna has taught her.

Synopsis:

Each button on Lauras memory string represents a piece of her family history. The buttons Laura cherishes the most belonged to her mother—a button from her prom dress, a white one off her wedding dress, and a single small button from the nightgown she was wearing on the day she died. When the string breaks, Lauras new stepmother, Jane, is there to comfort Laura and search for a missing button, just as Lauras mother would have done. But its not the same—Jane isnt Mom. In Eve Buntings moving story, beautifully illustrated by Ted Rand, Laura discovers that a memory string is not just for remembering the past: its also for recording new memories.

Synopsis:

Francisco, a young Mexican-American boy, helps his grandfather find work as a gardener, even though the old man cannot speak English and knows nothing about gardening.

Synopsis:

A young boy and his father visit the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

Synopsis:

The three leprechauns Ari, Boo, and Col have a job to do. They must race to where theyve buried the pot of gold and dig it up before the rainbow comes. The clouds are already gathering, so therell be no time for mischief along the way.

But Mrs. Ballybunions cow, Miss Maud Murphys hen, and Old Jamie soon find out that the three clever fellows cant resist having a little fun on the road to Paddywhackers Bog. For, in addition to putting a pot of gold at the end of a rainbow, mischief is what leprechauns do!

Delightful illustrations from a Caldecott medalist and a playful text written in a lilting Irish style make this a perfect story for St. Patricks Day or any other time of year. Includes an authors note about leprechauns and rainbows.

Synopsis:

From skiing in January, to surfing in July, to giving in December, two energetic piglets romp through the months of the year in this delightful calendar in verse.

At year's end, the piglets sum up their experiences:

Sing a song of seasons, Lots of things to do.

They would be fun With only one But I'm so glad we're two!

Synopsis:

Marianne, heading west with fourteen other children on an Orphan Train, is sure her mother will show up at one of the stations along the way. When her mother left Marianne at the orphanage, hadn't she promised she'd come for her after making a new life in the West? Stop after stop goes by, and there's no sign of her mother in the crowds that come to look over the children. No one shows any interest in adopting shy, plain Marianne, either. But that's all right: She has to be free for her mother to claim her. Then the train pulls into its final stop, a town called Somewhere . . .

Synopsis:

Laura Iwasaki and her family are paying what may be their last visit to Laura's grandfather's grave. The grave is at Manzanar, where thousands of Americans of Japanese heritage were interned during World War II. Among those rounded up and taken to the internment camp were Laura's father, then a small boy, and his parents. Now Laura says goodbye to Grandfather in her own special way, with a gesture that crosses generational lines and bears witness to the patriotism that survived a shameful episode in America's history. Eve Bunting's poignant text and Chris K. Soentpiet's detailed, evocative paintings make the story of this family's visit to Manzanar, and of the memories stirred by the experience, one that will linger in readers' minds and hearts. Afterword.

Synopsis:

Farah feels alone, even when surrounded by her classmates. She listens and nods but doesnand#8217;t speak. Itand#8217;s hard being the new kid in school, especially when youand#8217;re from another country and donand#8217;t know the language. Then, on a field trip to an apple orchard, Farah discovers there are lots of things that sound the same as they did at home, from dogs crunching their food to the ripple of friendly laughter. As she helps the class make apple cider, Farah connects with the other students and begins to feel that she belongs.

Ted Lewinand#8217;s gorgeous sun-drenched paintings and Eve Buntingand#8217;s sensitive text immediately put the reader into another childand#8217;s shoes in this timely story of a young Muslim immigrant.

Synopsis:

Esteemed author Eve Bunting brings all her insight, empathy, and storytelling skill to this powerful allegorical tale, set in the streets of an unnamed city and illustrated with striking woodcuts. Danny, new to town, is proud when a glittery-eyed tiger invites him for a ride. He climbs up onto the tigers massive back, and together they cruise the neighborhood. Everyone gives them respect—shopkeepers and passersby, even other kids. Danny feels powerful and much older than ten. Soon, though, he realizes it isnt respect people feel for him and the tiger—its fear. And when he decides to get down off the tigers back, he discovers its a lot harder than climbing on.

Whether the tiger is interpreted to represent gangs, drugs, or something else altogether, this poetically told, dramatically illustrated book is sure to provoke discussions about temp-tation, peer pressure, and conformity.

Synopsis:

Walking to school can be hard if you live in Belfast, Northern Ireland. It's downright dangerous if you're a Catholic, like Allison, and the shortest route to your school goes through a Protestant neighborhood. But sometimes a ray of kindness cuts through the violence. That's what happens when a demonstrator rips a brass button off Allison's new school blazer, and a Protestant girl not only retrieves the button but returns it to Allison.

Once again, as in FLY AWAY HOME and the caldecott-winning SMOKY NIGHT, Eve Bunting finds a way to explore a complicated contemporary situation in terms that any young reader can immediately grasp.

Synopsis:

"The Indian in us must disappear, they say. It must be tamed." In the late 1880s, ten-year-old Young Bull is sent to boarding school to learn the white man's ways. Eve Bunting's sensitive and poetic text recreates an experience shared by many Native American children in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Irving Toddy's dramatic paintings capture the beauty and color of the world Young Bull has left behind- and the vivid memories he preserves in his ledger drawings.

Synopsis:

andldquo;SCREE . . . SCREE . . .andrdquo;

Terry is half asleep when he hears the wailing, rising and falling like the waves of the sea. He wishes it were a dream, but he knows it isnandrsquo;t. It isnandrsquo;t an owl screeching, either. Or the Flannerysandrsquo; old cat. Could it be the Bansheeandmdash;the ghostly figure of Irish legend who wails outside a house when death is near?

Why would she come here?

In spite of his fears, Terry goes out to confront her. Is it really the Banshee, or . . . something else?

About the Author

EVE BUNTING has writtenandnbsp;over two hundredandnbsp;books for children, including the Caldecott Medal-winning Smoky Night, illustrated by David Diaz, The Wall, Fly Away Home, and Train to Somewhere. She lives in Southern California.

Emily Arnold McCully received the Caldecottandnbsp;Medal for Mirette on the High Wire. The illustrator of more than 40 books for young readers, she has a lifelong interest in history and feminist issues. She divides her time between Chatham, New York, and New York City.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780547558431
Author:
Bunting, Eve
Publisher:
Clarion Books
Author:
Soentpiet, Chris K.
Author:
McCully, Emily Arnold
Author:
Dooling, Michael
Author:
Carrick, Donald
Author:
Christiana, David
Author:
Toddy, Irving
Author:
Rand, Ted
Author:
Lewin, Ted
Author:
Peck, Beth
Author:
Diaz, David
Author:
Frampton, David
Author:
Himler, Ronald
Subject:
Historical - Prehistory
Subject:
Children s-General
Subject:
Situations / New Experience
Subject:
Holidays & Festivals - Thanksgiving
Subject:
Boys / Men
Subject:
Family - Multigenerational
Subject:
Family - Stepfamilies
Subject:
Situations / Violence
Subject:
Military - Veterans
Subject:
Holidays & Festivals - Other - Non-religious
Subject:
Animals - Pigs
Subject:
Family - Adoption
Subject:
Ethnic - Asian American
Subject:
Historical - Africa
Subject:
Historical - United States - 20th Century
Subject:
Situations / Peer Pressure
Subject:
People & Places - Europe
Subject:
Horror & Ghost Stories
Subject:
Ethnic - Native American
Edition Description:
Picture book
Publication Date:
20120331
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from P up to 3
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Full-color illustrations
Pages:
32
Dimensions:
10 x 8 in
Age Level:
from 5 up to 8

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Related Subjects

Children's » Clothing and Dress
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Children's » Picture Books » A to Z
Children's » Picture Books » General

Ballywhinney Girl New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$16.99 In Stock
Product details 32 pages Clarion Books - English 9780547558431 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In a haunting outing that treads on perhaps even more chilling turf than Bunting and McCully's previous collaboration, The Banshee (2009), the author whisks readers to the expansive countryside of her native Ireland. It's there, in a peat bog, that young Maeve and her grandfather make a startling discovery: the ancient mummified remains of a girl. Drama and suspense dovetail as the family and authorities follow procedures and come to grips with the significance of what they've found. 'I wasn't sure exactly how I felt,' Maeve thinks. 'There was fear/ and curiosity,/ but there was more./ Something I could not/ put my name to.' McCully's watercolor-and-ink compositions offer a front-row seat to the proceedings, though readers get just a few glimpses of the mummy. Maeve's delicately drawn face tells a tale all its own, filled with shock, concern, and sadness as she explores the connection she feels to the mummified girl. Though not for sensitive children, this memento mori has much to offer readers who are up to the challenge. An afterword provides information on the (fictional) story's real-life inspiration. Ages 4 — 8." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,
A young girl witnesses the discovery of the mummified body of another girl in an Irish bog and feels a strong connection to this unknown being from the past.
"Synopsis" by ,
After the police come, a family is forced to flee their Caribbean island and set sail for America in a small fishing boat.
"Synopsis" by ,
A homeless boy who lives in an airport with his father, moving from terminal to terminal trying not to be noticed, is given hope when a trapped bird finally finds its freedom.
"Synopsis" by ,
Anna and Grandma are planning a surprise for Dad's birthday. Dad thinks he has received all his presents, but Grandma stands up and gives him the best one of all: she reads aloud the stories that Anna has taught her.
"Synopsis" by ,
Each button on Lauras memory string represents a piece of her family history. The buttons Laura cherishes the most belonged to her mother—a button from her prom dress, a white one off her wedding dress, and a single small button from the nightgown she was wearing on the day she died. When the string breaks, Lauras new stepmother, Jane, is there to comfort Laura and search for a missing button, just as Lauras mother would have done. But its not the same—Jane isnt Mom. In Eve Buntings moving story, beautifully illustrated by Ted Rand, Laura discovers that a memory string is not just for remembering the past: its also for recording new memories.
"Synopsis" by ,
Francisco, a young Mexican-American boy, helps his grandfather find work as a gardener, even though the old man cannot speak English and knows nothing about gardening.
"Synopsis" by ,
A young boy and his father visit the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.
"Synopsis" by ,
The three leprechauns Ari, Boo, and Col have a job to do. They must race to where theyve buried the pot of gold and dig it up before the rainbow comes. The clouds are already gathering, so therell be no time for mischief along the way.

But Mrs. Ballybunions cow, Miss Maud Murphys hen, and Old Jamie soon find out that the three clever fellows cant resist having a little fun on the road to Paddywhackers Bog. For, in addition to putting a pot of gold at the end of a rainbow, mischief is what leprechauns do!

Delightful illustrations from a Caldecott medalist and a playful text written in a lilting Irish style make this a perfect story for St. Patricks Day or any other time of year. Includes an authors note about leprechauns and rainbows.

"Synopsis" by ,
From skiing in January, to surfing in July, to giving in December, two energetic piglets romp through the months of the year in this delightful calendar in verse.

At year's end, the piglets sum up their experiences:

Sing a song of seasons, Lots of things to do.

They would be fun With only one But I'm so glad we're two!

"Synopsis" by ,
Marianne, heading west with fourteen other children on an Orphan Train, is sure her mother will show up at one of the stations along the way. When her mother left Marianne at the orphanage, hadn't she promised she'd come for her after making a new life in the West? Stop after stop goes by, and there's no sign of her mother in the crowds that come to look over the children. No one shows any interest in adopting shy, plain Marianne, either. But that's all right: She has to be free for her mother to claim her. Then the train pulls into its final stop, a town called Somewhere . . .
"Synopsis" by ,
Laura Iwasaki and her family are paying what may be their last visit to Laura's grandfather's grave. The grave is at Manzanar, where thousands of Americans of Japanese heritage were interned during World War II. Among those rounded up and taken to the internment camp were Laura's father, then a small boy, and his parents. Now Laura says goodbye to Grandfather in her own special way, with a gesture that crosses generational lines and bears witness to the patriotism that survived a shameful episode in America's history. Eve Bunting's poignant text and Chris K. Soentpiet's detailed, evocative paintings make the story of this family's visit to Manzanar, and of the memories stirred by the experience, one that will linger in readers' minds and hearts. Afterword.
"Synopsis" by ,
Farah feels alone, even when surrounded by her classmates. She listens and nods but doesnand#8217;t speak. Itand#8217;s hard being the new kid in school, especially when youand#8217;re from another country and donand#8217;t know the language. Then, on a field trip to an apple orchard, Farah discovers there are lots of things that sound the same as they did at home, from dogs crunching their food to the ripple of friendly laughter. As she helps the class make apple cider, Farah connects with the other students and begins to feel that she belongs.

Ted Lewinand#8217;s gorgeous sun-drenched paintings and Eve Buntingand#8217;s sensitive text immediately put the reader into another childand#8217;s shoes in this timely story of a young Muslim immigrant.

"Synopsis" by ,
Esteemed author Eve Bunting brings all her insight, empathy, and storytelling skill to this powerful allegorical tale, set in the streets of an unnamed city and illustrated with striking woodcuts. Danny, new to town, is proud when a glittery-eyed tiger invites him for a ride. He climbs up onto the tigers massive back, and together they cruise the neighborhood. Everyone gives them respect—shopkeepers and passersby, even other kids. Danny feels powerful and much older than ten. Soon, though, he realizes it isnt respect people feel for him and the tiger—its fear. And when he decides to get down off the tigers back, he discovers its a lot harder than climbing on.

Whether the tiger is interpreted to represent gangs, drugs, or something else altogether, this poetically told, dramatically illustrated book is sure to provoke discussions about temp-tation, peer pressure, and conformity.

"Synopsis" by ,
Walking to school can be hard if you live in Belfast, Northern Ireland. It's downright dangerous if you're a Catholic, like Allison, and the shortest route to your school goes through a Protestant neighborhood. But sometimes a ray of kindness cuts through the violence. That's what happens when a demonstrator rips a brass button off Allison's new school blazer, and a Protestant girl not only retrieves the button but returns it to Allison.

Once again, as in FLY AWAY HOME and the caldecott-winning SMOKY NIGHT, Eve Bunting finds a way to explore a complicated contemporary situation in terms that any young reader can immediately grasp.

"Synopsis" by ,
"The Indian in us must disappear, they say. It must be tamed." In the late 1880s, ten-year-old Young Bull is sent to boarding school to learn the white man's ways. Eve Bunting's sensitive and poetic text recreates an experience shared by many Native American children in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Irving Toddy's dramatic paintings capture the beauty and color of the world Young Bull has left behind- and the vivid memories he preserves in his ledger drawings.
"Synopsis" by ,
andldquo;SCREE . . . SCREE . . .andrdquo;

Terry is half asleep when he hears the wailing, rising and falling like the waves of the sea. He wishes it were a dream, but he knows it isnandrsquo;t. It isnandrsquo;t an owl screeching, either. Or the Flannerysandrsquo; old cat. Could it be the Bansheeandmdash;the ghostly figure of Irish legend who wails outside a house when death is near?

Why would she come here?

In spite of his fears, Terry goes out to confront her. Is it really the Banshee, or . . . something else?

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