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Makers: All Kinds of People Making Amazing Things in Garages, Basements, and Backyards

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Makers: All Kinds of People Making Amazing Things in Garages, Basements, and Backyards Cover

 

Staff Pick

Get rid of your TV set and make something instead. This book, released by the publishers of Make magazine, rules. It features ordinary people making extraordinary things, like a personal submarine, a washtub Tesla coil, a go-kart with a turbine jet engine, and an eight-inch Dobson telescope built by three Girl Scouts. This inspiring look at DIY inventors makes my creative habit itch.
Recommended by Carole R., Powells.com

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Make magazine, launched in February 2005 as the first magazine devoted to Tech DIY projects, hardware hacks, and DIY inspiration, has been hailed as "a how-to guide for the opposable thumb set" and "Popular Mechanics for the modern age." Itching to build a cockroach-controlled robot, a portable satellite radio or your very own backyard monorail? Hankering to hack a game boy or your circadian rhythms? Rather read about people who fashion laptop bags from recycled wetsuits and build shopping cart go-karts? Make is required reading.

Now, following on the heels of Make's wildly popular inaugural issues, O'Reilly offers Makers, a beautiful hardbound book celebrating creativity, resourcefulness and the DIY spirit. Author Bob Parks profiles 100 people and their homebrew projects-people who make ingenious things in their backyards, basements and garages with a lot of imagination and a little applied skill.

Makers features technologies old and new used in service of the serious and the amusing, the practical and the outrageous. The makers profiled are driven by a combination of curiosity, passion and plain old stick-to-itiveness to create the unique and astonishing. Most are simply hobbyists who'll never gain notoriety for their work, but that's not what motivates them to tinker. The collection explores both the projects and the characters behind them, and includes full-color photographs and instructions to inspire weekend hackers.

Parks is just the man to track the quirky and outlandish in their natural maker habitats. A well-known journalist and author who covers the personalities behind the latest technologies, Parks' articles on innovations of all kinds have appeared in Wired, Outside, Business 2.0 and Make. He has contributed essays to "All Things Considered" on public radio and discussed trends in technology devices with Regis Philbin and Russ Mitchell on television. As a Wired editor, Parks directed coverage of new consumer technologies and contributed feature articles.

All those who love to tinker or who fancy themselves kindred DIY spirits will appreciate Parks' eclectic and intriguing collection of independent thinkers and makers.

Book News Annotation:

A man in Melbourne builds ultrasonic bat detectors for about US$23. Inspired by videos about birthing foals, a New York college professor has created a motorized walking table. In Virginia, someone has created a homemade nuclear fusor from such high-tech items as salad bowls and a half a pint of hydrogen isotope bought online. Journalist Parks, who is obviously pretty handy himself, describes the various tinkerers, tweakers and hackers who have devised everything from a necktie-tying machine to a car with a chemical toilet, a cellphone jammer and a go-kart with a turbine jet engine. Lest readers think these folks are only after the cheap thrills, he also describes such items as baby warmers made from scrap materials that have saved dozens of tiny lives. The inventions are well-illustrated, and some of the inventors appear here riding, operating, or shouting at their creations as appropriate.
Annotation 2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Book News Annotation:

A man in Melbourne builds ultrasonic bat detectors for about US$23. Inspired by videos about birthing foals, a New York college professor has created a motorized walking table. In Virginia, someone has created a homemade nuclear fusor from such high-tech items as salad bowls and a half a pint of hydrogen isotope bought online. Journalist Parks, who is obviously pretty handy himself, describes the various tinkerers, tweakers and hackers who have devised everything from a necktie-tying machine to a car with a chemical toilet, a cellphone jammer and a go-kart with a turbine jet engine. Lest readers think these folks are only after the cheap thrills, he also describes such items as baby warmers made from scrap materials that have saved dozens of tiny lives. The inventions are well-illustrated, and some of the inventors appear here riding, operating, or shouting at their creations as appropriate. Annotation ©2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

About the Author

For more than 10 years, journalist and author Bob Parks has covered the quirky, fascinating personalities behind the latest technologies. His feature articles on innovation in business, sports, health, and the outdoors have appeared in magazines such as "Make", "Wired", "Outside", and "Business 2.0". He's read essays on National Public Radio's All Things Considered and discussed trends in consumer devices with the likes of Regis Philbin and Russ Mitchell on television. Parks worked as an editor for Wired magazine for five years, directing coverage in new consumer technologies and contributing feature articles. He received a BA cum laude in English in 1992 from Bates College. He lives in Brattleboro, Vermont, with his wife, Eileen, and children, Archer and Lucy.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780596101886
Author:
Parks, Bob
Publisher:
O'Reilly Media
Subject:
Computer Graphics - General
Subject:
Technological innovations
Subject:
Inventors
Subject:
Computer graphics
Subject:
Graphics-General
Subject:
MAKE Magazine;Make;build;diy;do it yourself;projects
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20051231
Binding:
Paperback
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
184
Dimensions:
8 x 8 x 0.77 in 1.62 lb

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Related Subjects

» Computers and Internet » Computers Reference » General
» Computers and Internet » Computers Reference » Hardware
» Computers and Internet » Graphics » General
» Engineering » Engineering » Inventions
» Hobbies, Crafts, and Leisure » Crafts » General

Makers: All Kinds of People Making Amazing Things in Garages, Basements, and Backyards Used Hardcover
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$4.50 In Stock
Product details 184 pages O'Reilly Media - English 9780596101886 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

Get rid of your TV set and make something instead. This book, released by the publishers of Make magazine, rules. It features ordinary people making extraordinary things, like a personal submarine, a washtub Tesla coil, a go-kart with a turbine jet engine, and an eight-inch Dobson telescope built by three Girl Scouts. This inspiring look at DIY inventors makes my creative habit itch.

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