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1 Beaverton Children's Young Adult- General

Trouble

by

Trouble Cover

ISBN13: 9780618927661
ISBN10: 0618927662
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Henry Smith's father told him that if you build your house far enough away from Trouble, then Trouble will never find you.

But Trouble comes careening down the road one night in the form of a pickup truck that strikes Henry's older brother, Franklin. In the truck is Chay Chouan, a young Cambodian from Franklin's preparatory school, and the accident sparks racial tensions in the school — and in the well-established town where Henry's family has lived for generations.

Caught between anger and grief, Henry sets out to do the only thing he can think of: climb Mt. Katahdin, the highest mountain in Maine, which he and Franklin were going to climb together. Along with Black Dog, whom Henry has rescued from drowning, and a friend, Henry leaves without his parents' knowledge. The journey, both exhilarating and dangerous, turns into an odyssey of discovery about himself, his older sister, Louisa, his ancestry, and why one can never escape from Trouble.

Review:

"Tautly constructed, metaphorically rich, emotionally gripping and seductively told,Schmidt's (The Wednesday Wars) novel opens in the 300-year-old ancestral home of Henry Smith, whose father has raised him to believe that 'if you build your house far enough away from Trouble, then Trouble will never find you.' With such an opening, it is inevitable that Trouble does find the aristocratic Smiths: Henry's older brother, Franklin, is critically injured by a truck. A Cambodian refugee named Chay, who attends the same school as Franklin, acknowledges responsibility, but over the course of Chay's trial it occurs, to Henry at least, that it was Franklin who sought Trouble: the racism he directed toward Chay specifically and Cambodian immigrants generally has been so widely shared in the community that no one challenged it. Twin sequences of events plunge the Smiths and Chay into further tragedy, also revealing the ravages of Chay's childhood under the Khmer Rouge. At the same time, a storm exposes a charred slave ship long buried on the Smiths' private beach: it emerges that their house has been close to Trouble all along. For all the fine crafting, the novel takes a disturbingly broad-brush approach to racism. Characters are either thuggish or willfully blind or saintly, easily pegged on a moral scale — and therefore untrue to life. Ages 12-up." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Although the worst violence is not graphically described, the tragedy of Franklin's death and the atrocities committed against Chay's family during the war in Cambodia may be a little much for younger teens, making the book most appropriate for readers fourteen and older." VOYA

Review:

"[A]dds much to the discussion of how tragedy and racism affect individuals, families, and whole communities." Horn Book Magazine

About the Author

Gary D. Schmidt is the author of the Newbery Honor and Printz Honor book Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster Boy. His most recent novel is The Wednesday Wars. He is a professor of English at Calvin College in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

DSKM, November 10, 2008 (view all comments by DSKM)
This book is a very good book.
I've read the book before, it's a story about a troubled boy whos losing his brother .I give this book
a five star rating!
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 6 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780618927661
Author:
Schmidt, Gary D.
Publisher:
HMH Books for Young Readers
Subject:
Non-Classifiable
Subject:
Dogs
Subject:
Prejudices
Subject:
Social Issues - Prejudice & Racism
Subject:
Social Issues - Death & Dying
Subject:
Situations / Death & Dying
Subject:
Death
Subject:
Family - General
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction-Prejudice and Racism
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
20100412
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
from 7
Language:
English
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in 0.65 lb
Age Level:
09-12

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Related Subjects


Young Adult » Fiction » Social Issues » Death and Dying
Young Adult » Fiction » Social Issues » Prejudice and Racism
Young Adult » General

Trouble Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$7.95 In Stock
Product details 304 pages Clarion Books - English 9780618927661 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Tautly constructed, metaphorically rich, emotionally gripping and seductively told,Schmidt's (The Wednesday Wars) novel opens in the 300-year-old ancestral home of Henry Smith, whose father has raised him to believe that 'if you build your house far enough away from Trouble, then Trouble will never find you.' With such an opening, it is inevitable that Trouble does find the aristocratic Smiths: Henry's older brother, Franklin, is critically injured by a truck. A Cambodian refugee named Chay, who attends the same school as Franklin, acknowledges responsibility, but over the course of Chay's trial it occurs, to Henry at least, that it was Franklin who sought Trouble: the racism he directed toward Chay specifically and Cambodian immigrants generally has been so widely shared in the community that no one challenged it. Twin sequences of events plunge the Smiths and Chay into further tragedy, also revealing the ravages of Chay's childhood under the Khmer Rouge. At the same time, a storm exposes a charred slave ship long buried on the Smiths' private beach: it emerges that their house has been close to Trouble all along. For all the fine crafting, the novel takes a disturbingly broad-brush approach to racism. Characters are either thuggish or willfully blind or saintly, easily pegged on a moral scale — and therefore untrue to life. Ages 12-up." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Although the worst violence is not graphically described, the tragedy of Franklin's death and the atrocities committed against Chay's family during the war in Cambodia may be a little much for younger teens, making the book most appropriate for readers fourteen and older."
"Review" by , "[A]dds much to the discussion of how tragedy and racism affect individuals, families, and whole communities."
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