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The Deportees: And Other Stories

by

The Deportees: And Other Stories Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Eight funny and poignant stories of immigrant experience in contemporary Ireland.

The eight tales in Roddy Doyles first-ever collection of stories have one thing in common: someone born in Ireland meets someone who has come to live there. In "Guess Who's Coming for the Dinner," a father who prides himself on his open-mindedness when his daughters talk about sex is forced to confront his feelings when one of them brings home a black man. "New Boy" describes the first day of school for a nine-year-old boy from Africa; while in "The Pram," a terrifying ghost story, a Polish nanny grows impatient with her charge's older sisters and decides — in a new phrase she has learned — to "scare them shitless." In "57% Irish," a man decides to devise a test of Irishness by measuring reactions to three things: Riverdance, the song "Danny Boy," and Robbie Keane's goal against Germany in the 2002 World Cup. And in the wonderful title story, Jimmy Rabbitte, the man who formed The Commitments, decides that its time to find a new band — a multicultural outfit that specializes not in soul music but in the folk songs of Woody Guthrie.

This is classic Roddy Doyle, full of his unmistakable wit and his acute ear for dialogue. With empathy and insight, The Deportees and Other Stories takes a new slant on the immigrant experience, something of increasing relevance in today's Ireland.

Review:

"Doyle's dynamic first collection of short stories offers light and heartfelt perspectives on the effects of immigration on Irish culture. Originally serialized for a Dublin newspaper, all eight stories draw from the conceit of 'someone born in Ireland [who] meets someone who has come to live' there. The opener, 'Guess Who's Coming for the Dinner,' covers familiar ground — a self-proclaimed 'modern' father is taken aback when his daughter invites a 'black fella' to dinner — but Doyle's wry sense of humor saves the narrative from triteness. Fans of Doyle's previous work will revel in the title story, a follow-up to The Commitments that finds Jimmy Rabbitte masterminding a multicultural revival of Woody Guthrie music. The later stories find Doyle experimenting with different styles and voices: 'New Boy' charts an unlikely friendship between a nine-year-old African immigrant and two 'small, angry Irish boys,' while 'Black Hoodie' finds a timid, indifferent teenager discovering his passion for civil rights and a Nigerian girl. There are some abrupt endings that veer toward the convenient, though this may be an unavoidable consequence of their serial origins. Doyle's immense talent as a writer is neatly showcased throughout, and his sharp wit adds a richness to every tale." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"In the mid-1980s, Roddy Doyle began publishing a trio of novels about the family of Jimmy Rabbitte Sr., a plasterer by trade who lives with his huge family in the fictional Dublin suburb of Barrytown and rather happily winds up on the dole. Like John Updike's Harry 'Rabbit' Angstrom, Jimmy Sr. is compellingly average. He is a loving dad and a good-natured chum when it's fair weather, and a petty,... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Review:

"[I]mbued with Doyle's trademark wit and insight into the Irish character." Booklist

Review:

"Every selection reflects the author's mastery at creating authentic dialog and a realistic sense of place." Library Journal

Review:

"[W]hat might have been entertaining as a newsprint monthly series seems slight in book form." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"Doyle's work is purposefully rough around its edges, textured with authentic dialogue and sooty sentimentality." San Diego Union-Tribune

Review:

"Doyle's fiction has always been a rich mix of profane humor and poignant drama, and he hits that balance in miniature in these stories." St. Petersburg Times

Review:

"Just when it seemed that the only author left who gives a pig's whistle about writing superb short stories is Alice Munro, along comes Doyle with this superlative book of short tales to pick up the slack." Minneapolis Star Tribune

Review:

"The stories take on different shadings...but they're uniformly infused with Doyle's infectious sense of humor and lovingly profane dialogue." Miami Herald

Review:

"[An] easy excursion into the new Irish culture, conveyed with Doyle's usual brilliant sense of originality, sly charm and wry wit." Seattle Times

Review:

"[A] worthy accomplishment." Christian Science Monitor

Review:

"Doyle's mastery of ordinary Dubliners' speech informs all these stories and lends them an urgent credibility." Los Angeles Times

Synopsis:

The eight tales in Doyle's first-ever collection of stories have one thing in common: someone born in Ireland meets someone who has come to live there. Full of the authors unmistakable wit and his acute ear for dialogue, this collection takes a new slant on the immigrant experience.

Synopsis:

Roddy Doyle has earned a devoted following amongst those who appreciate his sly humor, acute ear for dialogue, and deeply human portraits of contemporary Ireland. The Deportees is Doyle's first-ever collection of short stories, and each tale describes the cultural collision-often funny and always poignant-between a native and someone new to the fast-changing country. From a nine-year- old African boy's first day at school to a man who's devised a test for "Irishness"to the return of The Commitments's Jimmy Rabbitte and the debut of his new multicultural band, Doyle offers his signature take on the immigrant experience in a volume reminiscent of his beloved early novels.

About the Author

Roddy Doyle has written eight novels, including The Commitments, The Van, The Woman Who Walked into Doors, A Star Called Henry, and, most recently, Paula Spencer. He won the Man Booker Prize in 1993 for Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha. He has also written four screenplays as well as several stage plays and books for children and young adults, most recently Wilderness.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780670018451
Subtitle:
and Other Stories
Publisher:
Penguin Books
Author:
Doyle, Roddy
Subject:
Social life and customs
Subject:
Ireland
Subject:
English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh
Subject:
Short Stories (single author)
Subject:
Stories (single author)
Subject:
Ireland Social life and customs.
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20081230
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
8.47x5.94x.91 in. .81 lbs.
Age Level:
from 18

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

The Deportees: And Other Stories
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 256 pages Viking Books - English 9780670018451 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Doyle's dynamic first collection of short stories offers light and heartfelt perspectives on the effects of immigration on Irish culture. Originally serialized for a Dublin newspaper, all eight stories draw from the conceit of 'someone born in Ireland [who] meets someone who has come to live' there. The opener, 'Guess Who's Coming for the Dinner,' covers familiar ground — a self-proclaimed 'modern' father is taken aback when his daughter invites a 'black fella' to dinner — but Doyle's wry sense of humor saves the narrative from triteness. Fans of Doyle's previous work will revel in the title story, a follow-up to The Commitments that finds Jimmy Rabbitte masterminding a multicultural revival of Woody Guthrie music. The later stories find Doyle experimenting with different styles and voices: 'New Boy' charts an unlikely friendship between a nine-year-old African immigrant and two 'small, angry Irish boys,' while 'Black Hoodie' finds a timid, indifferent teenager discovering his passion for civil rights and a Nigerian girl. There are some abrupt endings that veer toward the convenient, though this may be an unavoidable consequence of their serial origins. Doyle's immense talent as a writer is neatly showcased throughout, and his sharp wit adds a richness to every tale." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "[I]mbued with Doyle's trademark wit and insight into the Irish character."
"Review" by , "Every selection reflects the author's mastery at creating authentic dialog and a realistic sense of place."
"Review" by , "[W]hat might have been entertaining as a newsprint monthly series seems slight in book form."
"Review" by , "Doyle's work is purposefully rough around its edges, textured with authentic dialogue and sooty sentimentality."
"Review" by , "Doyle's fiction has always been a rich mix of profane humor and poignant drama, and he hits that balance in miniature in these stories."
"Review" by , "Just when it seemed that the only author left who gives a pig's whistle about writing superb short stories is Alice Munro, along comes Doyle with this superlative book of short tales to pick up the slack."
"Review" by , "The stories take on different shadings...but they're uniformly infused with Doyle's infectious sense of humor and lovingly profane dialogue."
"Review" by , "[An] easy excursion into the new Irish culture, conveyed with Doyle's usual brilliant sense of originality, sly charm and wry wit."
"Review" by , "[A] worthy accomplishment."
"Review" by , "Doyle's mastery of ordinary Dubliners' speech informs all these stories and lends them an urgent credibility."
"Synopsis" by , The eight tales in Doyle's first-ever collection of stories have one thing in common: someone born in Ireland meets someone who has come to live there. Full of the authors unmistakable wit and his acute ear for dialogue, this collection takes a new slant on the immigrant experience.
"Synopsis" by ,
Roddy Doyle has earned a devoted following amongst those who appreciate his sly humor, acute ear for dialogue, and deeply human portraits of contemporary Ireland. The Deportees is Doyle's first-ever collection of short stories, and each tale describes the cultural collision-often funny and always poignant-between a native and someone new to the fast-changing country. From a nine-year- old African boy's first day at school to a man who's devised a test for "Irishness"to the return of The Commitments's Jimmy Rabbitte and the debut of his new multicultural band, Doyle offers his signature take on the immigrant experience in a volume reminiscent of his beloved early novels.

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