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Original Essays | April 11, 2014

Paul Laudiero: IMG Shit Rough Draft



I was sitting in a British and Irish romantic drama class my last semester in college when the idea for Shit Rough Drafts hit me. I was working... Continue »
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And Then There's This: How Stories Live and Die in Viral Culture

by

And Then There's This: How Stories Live and Die in Viral Culture Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

An entertaining and eye-opening look into the new frontier of idea making.

Breaking news, fresh gossip, tiny scandals, trumped up crises — every day we are distracted by a culture that rings our doorbell and then runs away. Stories spread wildly and die out in mere days, quickly replaced by more stories with ever shorter shelflives. How we participate in these stories has changed, too. No longer do we sit on the sidelines waiting for monolithic media giants to tell us what's happening. Anyone on a computer in his or her local Starbucks can spread a story almost as easily as The New York Times, CNN, or People — in fact, blogs are now often the source for journalists working in big media.

And Then There's This is Bill Wasik's journey along the unexplored frontier of our churning and rambunctious viral culture. Covering this world — watching new bands promote themselves at South by Southwest; reporting on a Web site contest while secretly entering it; and creating a site that aggregates all blog smears against the presidential primary candidates — he ends up conducting six experiments himself. He doesn't always get the results he expected, but along the way he meets a cast of characters who are capable of getting their information into our brains — and they're not who you think.

And Then There's This reveals how our culture is now created from the ground up. Wasik proves that any one of us can cause a small ripple that can turn into a tsunami. Anyone involved in journalism, business, or information technology — and those who want to be — must read this book. And for the rest, Wasik's tour is great, eye-opening fun.

Review:

"Focusing on the phenomenon of viral culture, Wasik, senior editor at Harper's magazine, reflects on his own Internet experiments, beginning with the creation of 'flash mobs,' a pop phenomena of 2003. Wasik asked hundreds of people to gather in public for no apparent reason, and news of these gatherings that mysteriously coalesced and disbanded spread rabidly through blogs and e-mails. The groups were created by Wasik to explore the growing world of 'memes,' ideas that spread through culture, 'colonizing all as widely and ruthlessly as [they] can.' He examines other Internet sensations — the meteoric rise and fall of pop bands, guerrilla marketing and political blogs — relating how such 'nanostories' contribute to growing cynicism in a media-saturated and consumer-savvy public. He draws on the work of Steven Levitt and Malcolm Gladwell to demonstrate that the desire to interpret the analysis of culture has outstripped the desire to understand the culture itself. Wasik's examples are culled from the trivial — e.g., ephemeral indie bands and forgettable ad campaigns — but his deft style and provocative insights keep the book significant. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Wasik is fascinated by how the Internet and handheld wireless devices are changing basic social relationships....Wasik is well-informed and sharply addresses his slippery subject..." Kirkus Reviews

Synopsis:

Wasik journeys along the unexplored frontier of how stories live and die in viral culture to reveal how anyone on a computer can spread a story almost as easily as The New York Times, CNN, or People. 26 diagrams throughout.

Synopsis:

An engrossing, lively history of a fearsome and misunderstood virus that binds man and dog
and#160;
The most fatal virus known to science, rabiesandmdash;a disease that spreads avidly from animals to humansandmdash;kills nearly one hundred percent of its victims once the infection takes root in the brain. In this critically acclaimed exploration, journalist Bill Wasik and veterinarian Monica Murphy chart four thousand years of the history, science, and cultural mythology of rabies. From Greek myths to zombie flicks, from the laboratory heroics of Louis Pasteur to the contemporary search for a lifesaving treatment, Rabid is a fresh and often wildly entertaining look at one of humankindandrsquo;s oldest and most fearsome foes.

Synopsis:

An engrossing, lively history of a fearsome and misunderstood virus that binds man and dog
and#160;
The most fatal virus known to science, rabiesandmdash;a disease that spreads avidly from animals to humansandmdash;kills nearly one hundred percent of its victims once the infection takes root in the brain. In this critically acclaimed exploration, journalist Bill Wasik and veterinarian Monica Murphy chart four thousand years of the history, science, and cultural mythology of rabies. From Greek myths to zombie flicks, from the laboratory heroics of Louis Pasteur to the contemporary search for a lifesaving treatment, Rabid is a fresh and often wildly entertaining look at one of humankindandrsquo;s oldest and most fearsome foes.

About the Author

Bill Wasik is a senior editor at Harper's Magazine and the author of My Crowd: Experiments in Viral Culture. He lives in New York.

Roger D. Hodge is the editor of Harper's Magazine. He lives in New York.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780670020843
Subtitle:
How Stories Live and Die in Viral Culture
Author:
Wasik, Bill
Author:
Murphy, Monica
Publisher:
Penguin Books
Subject:
Social Aspects - General
Subject:
Psychology
Subject:
Information society
Subject:
Information technology
Subject:
Internet - Social aspects
Subject:
Information society - Psychological aspects
Subject:
Computers Reference-Social Aspects
Subject:
General science
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20100831
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Illustrations:
b/w diagrams throughout
Pages:
208
Dimensions:
9.00x5.90x1.00 in. .85 lbs.
Age Level:
17-17

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Related Subjects

Business » eCommerce
Computers and Internet » Computers Reference » Social Aspects » General
Religion » Comparative Religion » General
Religion » Western Religions » Theology
Science and Mathematics » Popular Science » Computer Science

And Then There's This: How Stories Live and Die in Viral Culture Sale Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$18.50 In Stock
Product details 208 pages Viking Books - English 9780670020843 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Focusing on the phenomenon of viral culture, Wasik, senior editor at Harper's magazine, reflects on his own Internet experiments, beginning with the creation of 'flash mobs,' a pop phenomena of 2003. Wasik asked hundreds of people to gather in public for no apparent reason, and news of these gatherings that mysteriously coalesced and disbanded spread rabidly through blogs and e-mails. The groups were created by Wasik to explore the growing world of 'memes,' ideas that spread through culture, 'colonizing all as widely and ruthlessly as [they] can.' He examines other Internet sensations — the meteoric rise and fall of pop bands, guerrilla marketing and political blogs — relating how such 'nanostories' contribute to growing cynicism in a media-saturated and consumer-savvy public. He draws on the work of Steven Levitt and Malcolm Gladwell to demonstrate that the desire to interpret the analysis of culture has outstripped the desire to understand the culture itself. Wasik's examples are culled from the trivial — e.g., ephemeral indie bands and forgettable ad campaigns — but his deft style and provocative insights keep the book significant. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Wasik is fascinated by how the Internet and handheld wireless devices are changing basic social relationships....Wasik is well-informed and sharply addresses his slippery subject..."
"Synopsis" by , Wasik journeys along the unexplored frontier of how stories live and die in viral culture to reveal how anyone on a computer can spread a story almost as easily as The New York Times, CNN, or People. 26 diagrams throughout.
"Synopsis" by ,
An engrossing, lively history of a fearsome and misunderstood virus that binds man and dog
and#160;
The most fatal virus known to science, rabiesandmdash;a disease that spreads avidly from animals to humansandmdash;kills nearly one hundred percent of its victims once the infection takes root in the brain. In this critically acclaimed exploration, journalist Bill Wasik and veterinarian Monica Murphy chart four thousand years of the history, science, and cultural mythology of rabies. From Greek myths to zombie flicks, from the laboratory heroics of Louis Pasteur to the contemporary search for a lifesaving treatment, Rabid is a fresh and often wildly entertaining look at one of humankindandrsquo;s oldest and most fearsome foes.

"Synopsis" by ,
An engrossing, lively history of a fearsome and misunderstood virus that binds man and dog
and#160;
The most fatal virus known to science, rabiesandmdash;a disease that spreads avidly from animals to humansandmdash;kills nearly one hundred percent of its victims once the infection takes root in the brain. In this critically acclaimed exploration, journalist Bill Wasik and veterinarian Monica Murphy chart four thousand years of the history, science, and cultural mythology of rabies. From Greek myths to zombie flicks, from the laboratory heroics of Louis Pasteur to the contemporary search for a lifesaving treatment, Rabid is a fresh and often wildly entertaining look at one of humankindandrsquo;s oldest and most fearsome foes.

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