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2 Burnside Music- Folk Biographies

This title in other editions

Alan Lomax: The Man Who Recorded the World

by

Alan Lomax: The Man Who Recorded the World Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Folklorist, archivist, anthropologist, singer, political activist, talent scout, ethnomusicologist, filmmaker, concert and record producer, Alan Lomax is best remembered as the man who introduced folk music to the masses.

Lomax began his career making field recordings of rural music for the Library of Congress and by the late 1930s brought his discoveries to radio, including Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, and Burl Ives. By the 1940s he was producing concerts that brought white and black performers together, and in the 1950s he set out to record the whole world.

Lomax was also a controversial figure. When he worked for the U. S. government he was tracked by the FBI, and when he worked in Britain, MI5 continued the surveillance. In his last years he turned to digital media and developed technology that anticipated today's breakthroughs. Featuring a cast of characters including Eleanor Roosevelt, Leadbelly, Carl Sandburg, Carl Sagan, Jelly Roll Morton, Muddy Waters, and Bob Dylan, Szwed's fascinating biography memorably captures Lomax and provides a definitive account of an era as seen through the life of one extraordinary man.

Review:

"In this busy biography, Columbia music professor Szwed (So What: The Life of Miles Davis) recounts Lomax's six decades of field trips seeking out and recording folk music untainted by commercial jazz and pop influences, especially in the American South, where he discovered blues luminaries Muddy Waters and Lead Belly; his radio shows, concerts, lectures, books, and films; and his impecunious bohemian existence with the likes of Woody Guthrie and Bob Dylan. Szwed presents Lomax (1915 — 2002) as a major intellectual force who championed the cultures of impoverished and racially outcast groups against a homogenizing modernity, and developed wildly ambitious sociopsychological 'cantometrics' that theorized a Freudian link between a culture's level of sexual repression and the vowel patterns in its songs. Lomax was an indefatigable promoter of music and ideas, but Szwed's breathless, swirling chronicle of his activities can be fatiguing. One also wishes he had probed more deeply into Lomax's problematic notion of a pure, primitive musical culture sprouting organically from the lives of rural people in isolation from urban entertainment elites. (Jan. 3)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)

Synopsis:

Alan Lomax is best remembered as the man who introduced folk music to the masses. Featuring a cast of characters that includes Eleanor Roosevelt and Bob Dylan, Szwed's fascinating biography provides a remarkable account of an era as seen through the life of one extraordinary man.

Synopsis:

Published in celebration of Holidays centenary, the first biography to focus on the singers extraordinary musical talent

When Billie Holiday stepped into Columbias studios in November 1933, it marked the beginning of what is arguably the most remarkable and influential career in ?twentieth-century popular music. Her voice weathered countless shifts in public taste, and new reincarnations of her continue to arrive, most recently in the form of singers like Amy Winehouse and Adele.

Most of the writing on Holiday has focused on the tragic details of her life—her prostitution at the age of fourteen, her heroin addiction and alcoholism, her series of abusive relationships—or tried to correct the many fabrications of her autobiography.  But now, Billie Holiday stays close to the music, to her performance style, and to the self she created and put into print, on record and on stage.

Drawing on a vast amount of new material that has surfaced in the last decade, critically acclaimed jazz writer John Szwed considers how her life inflected her art, her influences, her uncanny voice and rhythmic genius, a number of her signature songs, and her legacy.

Synopsis:

The remarkable life and times of the man who popularized American folk music and created the science of song

Folklorist, archivist, anthropologist, singer, political activist, talent scout, ethnomusicologist, filmmaker, concert and record producer, Alan Lomax is best remembered as the man who introduced folk music to the masses. Lomax began his career making field recordings of rural music for the Library of Congress and by the late 1930s brought his discoveries to radio, including Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, and Burl Ives. By the 1940s he was producing concerts that brought white and black performers together, and in the 1950s he set out to record the whole world.

Lomax was also a controversial figure. When he worked for the U. S. government he was tracked by the FBI, and when he worked in Britain, MI5 continued the surveillance. In his last years he turned to digital media and developed technology that anticipated today's breakthroughs. Featuring a cast of characters including Eleanor Roosevelt, Leadbelly, Carl Sandburg, Carl Sagan, Jelly Roll Morton, Muddy Waters, and Bob Dylan, Szwed's fascinating biography memorably captures Lomax and provides a definitive account of an era as seen through the life of one extraordinary man.

About the Author

John Szwed has written biographies of Sun Ra and Miles Davis. He is professor of music and jazz studies at Columbia University.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780670021994
Subtitle:
The Man Who Recorded the World
Author:
Szwed, John
Publisher:
Penguin Books
Subject:
Composers & Musicians - General
Subject:
Genres & Styles - Folk & Traditional
Subject:
Composers & Musicians
Subject:
Biography-Composers and Musicians
Subject:
General Biography
Subject:
Entertainment & Performing Arts
Edition Description:
Paperback / softback
Publication Date:
20111227
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Illustrations:
b/w photo frontispiece
Pages:
448
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 1 lb
Age Level:
18-17

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Music » Ethnomusicology
Arts and Entertainment » Music » General Biographies
Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Blues and Rhythm and Blues
Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Folk » American Folk
Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Folk » Biographies
Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Folk » Folk and Traditional
Arts and Entertainment » Sale Books
Biography » Composers and Musicians

Alan Lomax: The Man Who Recorded the World Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$15.95 In Stock
Product details 448 pages Viking Books - English 9780670021994 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In this busy biography, Columbia music professor Szwed (So What: The Life of Miles Davis) recounts Lomax's six decades of field trips seeking out and recording folk music untainted by commercial jazz and pop influences, especially in the American South, where he discovered blues luminaries Muddy Waters and Lead Belly; his radio shows, concerts, lectures, books, and films; and his impecunious bohemian existence with the likes of Woody Guthrie and Bob Dylan. Szwed presents Lomax (1915 — 2002) as a major intellectual force who championed the cultures of impoverished and racially outcast groups against a homogenizing modernity, and developed wildly ambitious sociopsychological 'cantometrics' that theorized a Freudian link between a culture's level of sexual repression and the vowel patterns in its songs. Lomax was an indefatigable promoter of music and ideas, but Szwed's breathless, swirling chronicle of his activities can be fatiguing. One also wishes he had probed more deeply into Lomax's problematic notion of a pure, primitive musical culture sprouting organically from the lives of rural people in isolation from urban entertainment elites. (Jan. 3)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)
"Synopsis" by , Alan Lomax is best remembered as the man who introduced folk music to the masses. Featuring a cast of characters that includes Eleanor Roosevelt and Bob Dylan, Szwed's fascinating biography provides a remarkable account of an era as seen through the life of one extraordinary man.
"Synopsis" by ,
Published in celebration of Holidays centenary, the first biography to focus on the singers extraordinary musical talent

When Billie Holiday stepped into Columbias studios in November 1933, it marked the beginning of what is arguably the most remarkable and influential career in ?twentieth-century popular music. Her voice weathered countless shifts in public taste, and new reincarnations of her continue to arrive, most recently in the form of singers like Amy Winehouse and Adele.

Most of the writing on Holiday has focused on the tragic details of her life—her prostitution at the age of fourteen, her heroin addiction and alcoholism, her series of abusive relationships—or tried to correct the many fabrications of her autobiography.  But now, Billie Holiday stays close to the music, to her performance style, and to the self she created and put into print, on record and on stage.

Drawing on a vast amount of new material that has surfaced in the last decade, critically acclaimed jazz writer John Szwed considers how her life inflected her art, her influences, her uncanny voice and rhythmic genius, a number of her signature songs, and her legacy.

"Synopsis" by ,
The remarkable life and times of the man who popularized American folk music and created the science of song

Folklorist, archivist, anthropologist, singer, political activist, talent scout, ethnomusicologist, filmmaker, concert and record producer, Alan Lomax is best remembered as the man who introduced folk music to the masses. Lomax began his career making field recordings of rural music for the Library of Congress and by the late 1930s brought his discoveries to radio, including Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, and Burl Ives. By the 1940s he was producing concerts that brought white and black performers together, and in the 1950s he set out to record the whole world.

Lomax was also a controversial figure. When he worked for the U. S. government he was tracked by the FBI, and when he worked in Britain, MI5 continued the surveillance. In his last years he turned to digital media and developed technology that anticipated today's breakthroughs. Featuring a cast of characters including Eleanor Roosevelt, Leadbelly, Carl Sandburg, Carl Sagan, Jelly Roll Morton, Muddy Waters, and Bob Dylan, Szwed's fascinating biography memorably captures Lomax and provides a definitive account of an era as seen through the life of one extraordinary man.

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