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The Tale of the Heike

by

The Tale of the Heike Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A masterpiece of world literature; the samurai saga of pride, romance, and warfare of medieval Japan

With a reflection on the fleeting nature of power and glory begins The Tale of the Heike, an epic from twelfth-century Japan. Comparable in stature to The Tale of Genji, The Tale of the Heike narrates with wit, energy, and compassion the stories of such unforgettable characters as the ruthless warlord Kiyomori, who dies still burning with such rage that water poured on him boils; Hotoke, the beautiful young dancer who renounces wealth and fame to follow her conscience; Shigemori, the tyrantandrsquo;s righteous son, who struggles against all odds to uphold fairness and justice; and Yoshitsune, the daring commander who defeats the enemy in battle after battle, only to be condemned by his jealous, powerful brother.

The Tale of the Heike is a foundation stone of Japanese culture and a major masterpiece of world literature. Lavishly illustrated and accompanied by maps, character guides, and genealogies, this book is a volume to treasure.

Review:

"This modern translation of the Japanese medieval classic tracing the rise and fall of the Taira (Heike) clan reads like the Iliad filtered through Akira Kurosawa, with battlefield panoramas and personal tragedies captured in an exquisitely cinematic narrative. Eight centuries of oral tradition have transformed historical figures into legends, none more so than Taira no Kiyomori, the 12th-century warlord who, by suppressing rebellions and putting relatives into key positions, rises so quickly through the imperial hierarchy that he forgets fundamental principles of Japanese epics: earthly possessions are transient; fear the angry dead. Kiyomori dismisses his faithful mistress, destroys two temples, cuts off numerous heads, and moves the capital on a whim. While arrogance proves Kiyomori's downfall, success beguiles the Minamoto (Genji) brothers, who defeat the Heike, then turn against one another. Memorable passages include descriptions of the dancer Gio, the old warhorse Yoshihisa, and the brave soldier Kumagai. Stories-within-stories highlight customs as varied as achieving redemption through renunciation and dressing the fashion-forward hero. Despite its antique style, readers will find themselves drawn into the book's alternately delicate and brutal world, where there are degrees of emperor (emperor, retired emperor, cloistered emperor) and monks (esoteric monks, fighting monks, retired nobility who become monks). Following his noteworthy translation of The Tale of Genji, Tyler offers accessible language while observing literary tradition in names and format. To help both old hands and newcomers navigate the vibrant yet sometimes arduous masterpiece, he provides an introduction, character list, maps, genealogies, chronologies, footnotes, and glorious 19th-century illustrations." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

From the acclaimed translator of The Tale of Genji, a groundbreaking rendering of Japanand#8217;s great martial epic

The fourteenth-century Tale of the Heike is Japanand#8217;s Iliadand#151;a moving depiction of the late twelfth-century wars between the Heike and Genji clans. No work has had a greater impact on later Japanese literature, theater, music, film, and mangaand#151;indeed on the Japanese peopleand#8217;s sense of their own past. It has also been a major source for medieval-Japan-based fantasy in English. With woodcuts by nineteenth-century artist Teisai Hokuba, a major student of the great Hokusai, Royall Tylerand#8217;s stunning presentation of this touchstone of Japanese culture recreates the oral epic as it was actually performed and conveys the rich and vigorous language of the original.

Synopsis:

From the acclaimed translator of The Tale of Genji, a groundbreaking rendering of Japans great martial epic

The fourteenth-century Tale of the Heike is Japans Iliad—a moving depiction of the late twelfth-century wars between the Heike and Genji clans. No work has had a greater impact on later Japanese literature, theater, music, film, and manga—indeed on the Japanese peoples sense of their own past. It has also been a major source for medieval-Japan-based fantasy in English. With woodcuts by nineteenth-century artist Teisai Hokuba, a major student of the great Hokusai, Royall Tylers stunning presentation of this touchstone of Japanese culture recreates the oral epic as it was actually performed and conveys the rich and vigorous language of the original.

About the Author

Royall Tyler was born in London, England, and grew up in Massachusetts, England, Washington D.C., and Paris. He has a B.A. in Far Eastern Languages from Harvard, and an M.A. in Japanese History and Ph. D. in Japanese literature from Columbia University. He has taught Japanese language and culture at, among other places, Ohio State University, the University of Wisconsin, and the University of Oslo, in Norway. Beginning in 1990, he taught at the Australian National University, in Canberra, from which he retired at the end of 2000. He will spend the American academic year 2001-02 as a Visiting Professor at Harvard.

Royall Tyler and his wife Susan live in a rammed earth house on 100 acres in the bush about seventy miles from Canberra, where they breed alpacas as a hobby.

Royall Tyler’s previous works include Japanese Noh Dramas, a selection and translation of Noh plays published by Penguin; Japanese Tales and French Folktales, anthologies published by Pantheon; and The Miracles of the Kasuga Deity, a study of a medieval Japanese cult published by Columbia University Press.

Table of Contents

Translated by Royall Tyler

Acknowledgments

List of Maps and Diagrams

Introduction

1. The Paulownia Pavilion (Kiritsubo)

2. The Broom Tree (Hahakigi)

3. The Cicada Shell (Utsusemi)

4. The Twilight Beauty (Yugao)

5. Young Murasaki (Wakamurasaki)

6. The Safflower (Suetsumuhana)

7. Beneath the Autumn Leaves (Momiji no Ga)

8. Under the Cherry Blossoms (Hana no En)

9. Heart-to-Heart (Aoi)

10. The Green Branch (Sakaki)

11. Falling Flowers (Hanachirusato)

12. Suma (Suma)

13. Akashi (Akashi)

14. The Pilgrimage to Sumiyoshi (Miotsukushi)

15. A Waste of Weeds (Yomogiu)

16. At the Pass (Sekiya)

17. The Picture Contest (Eawase)

18. Wind in the Pines (Matsukaze)

19. Wisps of Cloud (Usugumo)

20. The Bluebell (Asagao)

21. The Maidens (Otome)

22. The Tendril Wreath (Tamakazura)

23. The Warbler's First Song (Hatsune)

24. Butterflies (Kocho)

25. The Fireflies (Hotaru)

26. The Pink (Tokonatsu)

27. The Cressets (Kagaribi)

28. The Typhoon (Nowaki)

29. The Imperial Progress (Miyuki)

30. Thoroughwort Flowers (Fujibakama)

31. The Handsome Pillar (Makibashira)

32. The Plum Tree Branch (Umegae)

33. New Wisteria Leaves (Fuji no Uraba)

34. Spring Shoots I (Wakana 1)

35. Spring Shoots II (Wakana 2)

36. The Oak Tree (Kashiwagi)

37. The Flute (Yokobue)

38. The Bell Cricket (Suzumushi)

39. Evening Mist (Yugiri)

40. The Law (Minori)

41. The Seer (Maboroshi)

Vanished into the Clouds (Kumogakure)

42. The Perfumed Prince (Niou Miya)

43. Red Plum Blossoms (Kobai)

44. Bamboo River (Takekawa)

45. The Maiden of the Bridge (Hashihime)

46. Beneath the Oak (Shiigamoto)

47. Trefoil Knots (Agemaki)

48. Bracken Shoots (Sawarabi)

49. The Ivy (Yadorigi)

50. The Eastern Cottage (Azumaya)

51. A Drifting Boat (Ukifune)

52. The Mayfly (Kagero)

53. Writing Practice (Tenarai)

54. The Floating Bridge of Dreams (Yume no Ukihashi)

Chronology

General Glossary

Clothing and Color

Offices and Titles

Summary of Poetic Allusions Identified in the Notes

Characters in The Tale of Genji

Further Reading

Product Details

ISBN:
9780670025138
Author:
Tyler, Royall
Publisher:
Penguin Classics
Author:
Various
Author:
Shikibu, Murasaki
Subject:
Classics
Subject:
Eastern
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
Folklore
Edition Description:
Paperback / softback
Series:
Penguin Classics Deluxe Editio
Publication Date:
20140325
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Illustrations:
b/w illustrations throughout
Pages:
784
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 1 lb
Age Level:
from 18

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Art » General
Fiction and Poetry » Classics » General Asian
Fiction and Poetry » Classics » Japanese
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » Sale Books
History and Social Science » World History » General
Pets » General
Religion » Comparative Religion » General
Religion » Eastern Religions » Japanese Religion and Literature

The Tale of the Heike Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$21.00 In Stock
Product details 784 pages Viking Books - English 9780670025138 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "This modern translation of the Japanese medieval classic tracing the rise and fall of the Taira (Heike) clan reads like the Iliad filtered through Akira Kurosawa, with battlefield panoramas and personal tragedies captured in an exquisitely cinematic narrative. Eight centuries of oral tradition have transformed historical figures into legends, none more so than Taira no Kiyomori, the 12th-century warlord who, by suppressing rebellions and putting relatives into key positions, rises so quickly through the imperial hierarchy that he forgets fundamental principles of Japanese epics: earthly possessions are transient; fear the angry dead. Kiyomori dismisses his faithful mistress, destroys two temples, cuts off numerous heads, and moves the capital on a whim. While arrogance proves Kiyomori's downfall, success beguiles the Minamoto (Genji) brothers, who defeat the Heike, then turn against one another. Memorable passages include descriptions of the dancer Gio, the old warhorse Yoshihisa, and the brave soldier Kumagai. Stories-within-stories highlight customs as varied as achieving redemption through renunciation and dressing the fashion-forward hero. Despite its antique style, readers will find themselves drawn into the book's alternately delicate and brutal world, where there are degrees of emperor (emperor, retired emperor, cloistered emperor) and monks (esoteric monks, fighting monks, retired nobility who become monks). Following his noteworthy translation of The Tale of Genji, Tyler offers accessible language while observing literary tradition in names and format. To help both old hands and newcomers navigate the vibrant yet sometimes arduous masterpiece, he provides an introduction, character list, maps, genealogies, chronologies, footnotes, and glorious 19th-century illustrations." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,
From the acclaimed translator of The Tale of Genji, a groundbreaking rendering of Japanand#8217;s great martial epic

The fourteenth-century Tale of the Heike is Japanand#8217;s Iliadand#151;a moving depiction of the late twelfth-century wars between the Heike and Genji clans. No work has had a greater impact on later Japanese literature, theater, music, film, and mangaand#151;indeed on the Japanese peopleand#8217;s sense of their own past. It has also been a major source for medieval-Japan-based fantasy in English. With woodcuts by nineteenth-century artist Teisai Hokuba, a major student of the great Hokusai, Royall Tylerand#8217;s stunning presentation of this touchstone of Japanese culture recreates the oral epic as it was actually performed and conveys the rich and vigorous language of the original.

"Synopsis" by ,
From the acclaimed translator of The Tale of Genji, a groundbreaking rendering of Japans great martial epic

The fourteenth-century Tale of the Heike is Japans Iliad—a moving depiction of the late twelfth-century wars between the Heike and Genji clans. No work has had a greater impact on later Japanese literature, theater, music, film, and manga—indeed on the Japanese peoples sense of their own past. It has also been a major source for medieval-Japan-based fantasy in English. With woodcuts by nineteenth-century artist Teisai Hokuba, a major student of the great Hokusai, Royall Tylers stunning presentation of this touchstone of Japanese culture recreates the oral epic as it was actually performed and conveys the rich and vigorous language of the original.

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