Master your Minecraft
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Tour our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    What I'm Giving | December 3, 2014

    Mary Oliver: IMG Mary Oliver: What I'm Giving



    At Powell's, we feel the holidays are the perfect time to share our love of books with those close to us. For this special blog series, we reached... Continue »

    spacer

This item may be
out of stock.

Click on the button below to search for this title in other formats.


Check for Availability
Add to Wishlist

They Would Never Hurt a Fly: War Criminals on Trial in the Hague

They Would Never Hurt a Fly: War Criminals on Trial in the Hague Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In her novel S., Slavenka Drakulic´ explored the horror of genocide and the lives that were ripped apart during the Bosnian conflict of the early 1990s. Now, in They Would Never Hurt a Fly, she confronts one of the consequences of that war—the prisoners being tried at The Hague for their war crimes by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia.

During that terrible and bloody clash, countless humans were tortured, raped, and murdered—unspeakable acts committed in the name of“ethnic cleansin” and all authorized by the government. Drakulic´ introduces readers to the accused—from the infamous to the unknown to the unquestionably guilty, including former Serbian president Slobodan Milosevic´—seeking to understand the people behind the horrific crimes. She asserts that the trials are important not just because of the dead, but also because of the living.“In the end” she writes about the war criminals,“what matters... is one single important question: what would I do in their situation”

Review:

"What causes people to participate in genocide? Respected Croatian journalist Drakulic (How We Survived Communism and Even Laughed) set out to explore the psyches of the people who turned her former country, Yugoslavia, into a killing field in the early 1990s. Observing them on trial for war crimes before the International Tribunal in the Hague, Drakulic depicts the perpetrators, from Radomir Kovac, who raped young girls, to the delusional former Serb president Slobodan Milosevic, often from the point of view of the perpetrators themselves. The novelistic imputation of imagined thoughts can be distracting. Nevertheless, with a few exceptions, the snapshots are powerful and horrifying: they include a chilling description of the slaughter at Srebrenica through the eyes of a reluctant Bosnian soldier forced to kill or be killed, and a portrayal of an entire town's complicity in the murder of a Croatian militiaman after he courageously testified before the tribunal. Drakulic's analysis of why people choose evil — fear, opportunism, propaganda, lust for power and identity, historical grievances — offers little that's new, and her conclusion — 'if ordinary people committed war crimes, it means that any of us begs the question of why some found the courage to say no. But her focus on the perpetrators and their apparently inexplicable moral choices forces us to face the questions of good and evil these crimes raise." Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

"Who were they? Ordinary people like you or me—or monsters?” asks internationally acclaimed author Slavenka Drakulic as she sets out to understand the people behind the horrific crimes committed during the war that tore apart Yugoslavia in the 1990s. Drawing on firsthand observations of the trials, as well as on other sources, Drakulic portrays some of the individuals accused of murder, rape, torture, ordering executions, and more during one of the most brutal conflicts in Europe in the twentieth century, including former Serbian president Slobodan Miloševic; Radislav Krstic, the first to be sentenced for genocide; Biljana Plavšic, the only woman accused of war crimes; and Ratko Mladic, now in hiding. With clarity and emotion, Drakulic  paints a wrenching portrait of a country needlessly torn apart.

Synopsis:

Drakulic introduces readers to the accused individuals from the Bosnian conflict of the early 1990s--from the infamous to the unknown to the unquestionably guilty--seeking to understand the people behind the horrific crimes.

About the Author

Slavenka Drakulic was born in Croatia in 1949. The author of several works of nonfiction and novels, she has written for The New York Times, The Nation, The New Republic, and numerous publications around the world.

Table of Contents

Introduction: Not a Fairy Tale

1. Why The Hague

2. Justice Is Boring

3. A Suicide Scenario

4. A Quiet Night in October

5. Boys Just Had Fun

6. He Would Never Hurt a Fly

7. "Triumph of Evil"

8. One Day in the Life of Drazen Erdemovic

9. A Beast in a Cage

10. Ribbons and Bows

11. Punished by the Gods

12. The Metamorphosis of Biljana Plavsic

13. Why We Need Monsters

Epilogue: Brotherhood and Unity

Acknowledgments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780670033324
Subtitle:
War Criminals on Trial in The Hague
Publisher:
Viking Adult
Author:
Drakulic, Slavenka
Location:
New York
Subject:
Eastern Europe - Yugoslavia
Subject:
War criminals
Subject:
Nationalism
Subject:
Political culture
Subject:
Yugoslav war, 1991-1995
Subject:
Yugoslav War Crime Trials, Hague, Netherlands, 1994-
Subject:
Eastern Europe - Balkan Republics
Subject:
General History
Subject:
Europe - Eastern
Edition Description:
Hardback
Series Volume:
TA 62
Publication Date:
20040803
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Illustrations:
b/w map on pages viii-ix
Pages:
224
Dimensions:
8.32x5.78x.85 in. .74 lbs.
Age Level:
from 18

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Europe » Eastern Europe » Former Yugoslavia

They Would Never Hurt a Fly: War Criminals on Trial in the Hague
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 224 pages Viking Books - English 9780670033324 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "What causes people to participate in genocide? Respected Croatian journalist Drakulic (How We Survived Communism and Even Laughed) set out to explore the psyches of the people who turned her former country, Yugoslavia, into a killing field in the early 1990s. Observing them on trial for war crimes before the International Tribunal in the Hague, Drakulic depicts the perpetrators, from Radomir Kovac, who raped young girls, to the delusional former Serb president Slobodan Milosevic, often from the point of view of the perpetrators themselves. The novelistic imputation of imagined thoughts can be distracting. Nevertheless, with a few exceptions, the snapshots are powerful and horrifying: they include a chilling description of the slaughter at Srebrenica through the eyes of a reluctant Bosnian soldier forced to kill or be killed, and a portrayal of an entire town's complicity in the murder of a Croatian militiaman after he courageously testified before the tribunal. Drakulic's analysis of why people choose evil — fear, opportunism, propaganda, lust for power and identity, historical grievances — offers little that's new, and her conclusion — 'if ordinary people committed war crimes, it means that any of us begs the question of why some found the courage to say no. But her focus on the perpetrators and their apparently inexplicable moral choices forces us to face the questions of good and evil these crimes raise." Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by ,

"Who were they? Ordinary people like you or me—or monsters?” asks internationally acclaimed author Slavenka Drakulic as she sets out to understand the people behind the horrific crimes committed during the war that tore apart Yugoslavia in the 1990s. Drawing on firsthand observations of the trials, as well as on other sources, Drakulic portrays some of the individuals accused of murder, rape, torture, ordering executions, and more during one of the most brutal conflicts in Europe in the twentieth century, including former Serbian president Slobodan Miloševic; Radislav Krstic, the first to be sentenced for genocide; Biljana Plavšic, the only woman accused of war crimes; and Ratko Mladic, now in hiding. With clarity and emotion, Drakulic  paints a wrenching portrait of a country needlessly torn apart.

"Synopsis" by , Drakulic introduces readers to the accused individuals from the Bosnian conflict of the early 1990s--from the infamous to the unknown to the unquestionably guilty--seeking to understand the people behind the horrific crimes.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.