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1 Remote Warehouse Humor- General

The Memory of Running

by

The Memory of Running Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The Memory of Running tells the story of Smithson Ide, a 43-year-old, 279-pound supervisor at a GI Joe factory where his job is to make sure that the arms of the action figures are properly turned in, not out. After his parents die in a car crash, Smithson discovers that his beautiful, mentally disturbed older sister Bethany has also died, in California. Smithson retrieves his old Raleigh bicycle in the garage of his parents' Rhode Island home and begins a cross-country journey to reclaim Bethany's body. The novel moves back and forth in alternating chapters that give us the story of Smithson's family, particularly his sister's descent into madness, and the story of his epic odyssey across America. Keenly aware of how ridiculous he must appear on his bike, Smithson nevertheless perseveres through a long journey that is hilarious, luminous and extraordinary.

From Stephen King's "The Pop of King" column in Entertainment Weekly: "The Memory of Running is the story of 279-pound Smithson Ide, a smokes-too-much, drinks-too-much heart attack waiting to happen. I mean, this guy is a mess...Smithy is an American original, worthy of a place on the shelf just below your Hucks, your Holdens, and your Yossarians...this is a book that can do no more than walk; it has a chance to be a breakout bestseller. It's big-hearted and satisfying as one of your Mom's home-cooked Sunday dinners...So why not ride across America with Smith and root for him...you'll be striking a blow for the good old American novel. More important, you'll do the stuff good novels are supposed to make you do — laugh a little, cry a little, maybe ride(or jog) an extra time around the block in order to find out what happens next.You'll also discover a fine American voice."

Review:

"Smithy Ide is a really nice guy. But he's also an overweight, friendless, womanless, hard-drinking, 43-year-old self-professed loser with a breast fetish and a dead-end job, given to stammering 'I just don't know' in life's confusing moments. When Smithy's entire family dies, he embarks on a transcontinental bicycle trip to recover his sister's body and rediscover what it means to live. Along the way, he flashes back to his past and the hardships of his beloved sister's schizophrenia, while his dejection encourages strangers to share their life stories. The road redeems the innocent Smithy: he loses weight; rescues a child from a blizzard; rebuffs the advances of a nubile, 'apple-breasted' co-cyclist after seeing a vision of his dead sister; and nurtures a telephone romance with a paraplegic family friend as he processes his rocky past. McLarty, a playwright and television actor, propels the plot with glib mayhem — including three tragic car accidents in 31 pages and a death by lightning bolt — and a lot of bighearted and warm but faintly mournful humor. It's a funny, poignant, slightly gawky debut that aims, like its protagonist, to please — and usually does. Agent, Jeff Kleinman at Graybill & English. Forecast: Stephen King hailed this as 'the best book you can't read' (it was an audiobook only) in a now-famous 2003 Entertainment Weekly column; a 15-city tour and McLarty's certain stage presence should make plenty of folks sit up and take notice." Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

McLarty pens the story of Smithson Ide, a 43-year-old, 279-pound supervisor at a GI Joe factory, who begins a cross-country journey on his old Raleigh bicycle to retrieve the body of his beautiful, mentally disturbed sister.

Synopsis:

Every decade seems to produce a novel that captures the public’s imagination with a story that sweeps readers up and takes them on a thrilling, unforgettable ride. Ron McLarty’s The Memory of Running is this decade’s novel. By all accounts, especially his own, Smithson "Smithy" Ide is a loser. An overweight, friendless, chain-smoking, forty-three-year-old drunk, Smithy’s life becomes completely unhinged when he loses his parents and long-lost sister within the span of one week. Rolling down the driveway of his parents’ house in Rhode Island on his old Raleigh bicycle to escape his grief, the emotionally bereft Smithy embarks on an epic, hilarious, luminous, and extraordinary journey of discovery and redemption.

Synopsis:

Once in a great while, a story comes along that has everything: plot, setting, and, most important of all, the kind of characters that sweep readers up and take them on a thrilling, unforgettable ride. Well, get ready for Ron McLart‛s The Memory of Running because, as Stephen King wrote in Entertainment Weekly (Stephen Kin‛s“The Pop of Kin” column for Entertainment Weekly),“Smithy is an American original, worthy of a place on the shelf just below your Hucks, your Holdens, your Yossarians”

Meet Smithson“Smith” Ide, an overweight, friendless, chain-smoking, forty-three-year-old drunk who works as a quality control inspector at a toy action-figure factory in Rhode Island. By all accounts, including Smith‛s own, h‛s a loser. But when Smith‛s life of quiet desperation is brutally interrupted by tragedy, he stumbles across his old Raleigh bicycle and impulsively sets off on an epic journey that might give him one last chance to become the person he always wanted to be. As he pedals across America¬—with stops in New York City, St. Louis, Denver, and Phoenix, to name a few¬—he encounters humanity at its best and worst and adventures that are by turns hilarious, luminous, and extraordinary. Along the way, Smithy falls in love and back into life.

McLart‛s novel has already received significant attention for its unusual genesis as an audiobook. Now, in a major publishing event, Viking heralds the arrival of a major new voice in American fiction with his stunning debut, The Memory of Running.

About the Author

Ron McLarty is an award-winning actor and playwright best known for his appearances on television series, including Law and Order, Sex and the City, The Practice, and Judging Amy. He has appeared in films and on the stage, where he has directed many of his own plays.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780670033638
Author:
McLarty, Ron
Publisher:
Penguin Books
Author:
McLarty, Ron
Subject:
General
Subject:
Humorous
Subject:
Death
Subject:
Psychological
Subject:
Sisters
Subject:
Adventure
Edition Description:
Paperback / softback
Publication Date:
20051227
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Pages:
384
Dimensions:
9.48x6.46x1.20 in. 1.42 lbs.
Age Level:
from 18

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Humor » General
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

The Memory of Running Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$9.95 In Stock
Product details 384 pages Viking Books - English 9780670033638 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Smithy Ide is a really nice guy. But he's also an overweight, friendless, womanless, hard-drinking, 43-year-old self-professed loser with a breast fetish and a dead-end job, given to stammering 'I just don't know' in life's confusing moments. When Smithy's entire family dies, he embarks on a transcontinental bicycle trip to recover his sister's body and rediscover what it means to live. Along the way, he flashes back to his past and the hardships of his beloved sister's schizophrenia, while his dejection encourages strangers to share their life stories. The road redeems the innocent Smithy: he loses weight; rescues a child from a blizzard; rebuffs the advances of a nubile, 'apple-breasted' co-cyclist after seeing a vision of his dead sister; and nurtures a telephone romance with a paraplegic family friend as he processes his rocky past. McLarty, a playwright and television actor, propels the plot with glib mayhem — including three tragic car accidents in 31 pages and a death by lightning bolt — and a lot of bighearted and warm but faintly mournful humor. It's a funny, poignant, slightly gawky debut that aims, like its protagonist, to please — and usually does. Agent, Jeff Kleinman at Graybill & English. Forecast: Stephen King hailed this as 'the best book you can't read' (it was an audiobook only) in a now-famous 2003 Entertainment Weekly column; a 15-city tour and McLarty's certain stage presence should make plenty of folks sit up and take notice." Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , McLarty pens the story of Smithson Ide, a 43-year-old, 279-pound supervisor at a GI Joe factory, who begins a cross-country journey on his old Raleigh bicycle to retrieve the body of his beautiful, mentally disturbed sister.
"Synopsis" by ,

Every decade seems to produce a novel that captures the public’s imagination with a story that sweeps readers up and takes them on a thrilling, unforgettable ride. Ron McLarty’s The Memory of Running is this decade’s novel. By all accounts, especially his own, Smithson "Smithy" Ide is a loser. An overweight, friendless, chain-smoking, forty-three-year-old drunk, Smithy’s life becomes completely unhinged when he loses his parents and long-lost sister within the span of one week. Rolling down the driveway of his parents’ house in Rhode Island on his old Raleigh bicycle to escape his grief, the emotionally bereft Smithy embarks on an epic, hilarious, luminous, and extraordinary journey of discovery and redemption.

"Synopsis" by , Once in a great while, a story comes along that has everything: plot, setting, and, most important of all, the kind of characters that sweep readers up and take them on a thrilling, unforgettable ride. Well, get ready for Ron McLart‛s The Memory of Running because, as Stephen King wrote in Entertainment Weekly (Stephen Kin‛s“The Pop of Kin” column for Entertainment Weekly),“Smithy is an American original, worthy of a place on the shelf just below your Hucks, your Holdens, your Yossarians”

Meet Smithson“Smith” Ide, an overweight, friendless, chain-smoking, forty-three-year-old drunk who works as a quality control inspector at a toy action-figure factory in Rhode Island. By all accounts, including Smith‛s own, h‛s a loser. But when Smith‛s life of quiet desperation is brutally interrupted by tragedy, he stumbles across his old Raleigh bicycle and impulsively sets off on an epic journey that might give him one last chance to become the person he always wanted to be. As he pedals across America¬—with stops in New York City, St. Louis, Denver, and Phoenix, to name a few¬—he encounters humanity at its best and worst and adventures that are by turns hilarious, luminous, and extraordinary. Along the way, Smithy falls in love and back into life.

McLart‛s novel has already received significant attention for its unusual genesis as an audiobook. Now, in a major publishing event, Viking heralds the arrival of a major new voice in American fiction with his stunning debut, The Memory of Running.

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