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A Field Guide to Getting Lost

A Field Guide to Getting Lost Cover

 

Staff Pick

"Rebecca Solnit's marvelous new book of essays, A Field Guide to Getting Lost, is about the spaces between stability and risk, solitude, and the occasional claustrophobia of ordinary life. She explores the mysterious without puncturing the mystery, and that is a remarkable achievement indeed."
Recommended by Jill Owens, Powells.com

Review-A-Day

"A Field Guide to Getting Lost could be considered a very erudite sort of self-help book, dispensing, as it does, lessons such as, 'fear of making mistakes can itself be a huge mistake.' But it would be a shame to squeeze this book into a genre; it is a book brilliant in its connections and brave in its digressions. It is a book (of course it is) to get lost in." Anna Godbersen, Esquire (read the entire Esquire review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

With such acclaimed books as River of Shadows and Wanderlust, activist and cultural historian Rebecca Solnit has emerged as one of the most original and penetrating writers at work today. Her brilliant new book, A Field Guide to Getting Lost, is about the stories we use to navigate our way through the world, and the places we traverse, from wilderness to cities, in finding ourselves, or losing ourselves. Written as a series of autobiographical essays, it draws on emblematic moments and relationships in Solnit's own life to explore issues of uncertainty, trust, loss, memory, desire, and place. While deeply personal, Solnit's book is not just a memoir, since her own stories link up with everything from the captivity narratives of early American immigrants to endangered species to the use of the color blue in Renaissance painting, not to mention encounters with tortoises, monks, punk rockers, mountains, deserts, and the movie Vertigo. The result is a distinctive, stimulating voyage of discovery that only a writer of Solnit's caliber and curiosity could produce, a book that will appeal not only to her growing legion of admirers but to the readers of Anne Lamott, Diane Ackerman, and Annie Dillard.

Review:

"The virtues of being open to new and transformative experiences are rhapsodized but not really illuminated in this discursive and somewhat gauzy set of linked essays. Cultural historian Solnit, an NBCC award winner for River of Shadows: Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West, allows the subject of getting lost to lead her where it will, from early American captivity narratives to the avant-garde artist Yves Klein. She interlaces personal and familial histories of disorientation and reinvention, writing of her Russian Jewish forebears' arrival in the New World, her experiences driving around the American west and listening to country music, and her youthful immersion in the punk rock demimonde. Unfortunately, the conceit of embracing the unknown is not enough to impart thematic unity to these essays; one piece ties together the author's love affair with a reclusive man, desert fauna, Hitchcock's Vertigo and the blind seer Tiresias in ways that will indeed leave readers feeling lost. Solnit's writing is as abstract and intangible as her subject, veering between oceanic lyricism ('Blue is the color of longing for the distance you never arrive in') and penses about the limitations of human understanding ('Between words is silence, around ink whiteness, behind every map's information is what's left out, the unmapped and unmappable') that seem profound but are actually banal once you think about them. Agent, Bonnie Nadell at Frederick Hill Assoc. (July 11)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Solnit not only thinks innovatively and writes beautifully, she also trips the wire in the mind that hushes the static of routine concerns and allows readers to perceive hidden aspects of life." Booklist

Review:

"Solnit is a distinctive and original writer....[A]lthough one might hesitate to call her a consummate prose stylist, her expressive, often beautiful writing finely conveys the force of her insights and vision. For the intrepid Blakean 'mental traveler' as well as for travelers of the physical realms, A Field Guide to Getting Lost is a book to set you wandering down strangely fruitful trails of thought." Los Angeles Times

Review:

"At its best, Solnit's writing in Getting Lost evokes some of the great writers of the West, especially the desert and its denizens: Edward Abbey, Willa Cather and, perhaps most of all, Mary Austin, with whom Solnit shares a feminist sensibility about the place of humans in the natural world." San Diego Union-Tribune

Synopsis:

Written as a series of autobiographical essays, it draws on emblematic moments and relationships in Solnit's own life to explore issues of uncertainty, trust, loss, memory, desire, and place. While deeply personal, Solnit's book is not just a memoir, since her own stories link up with everything from the captivity narratives of early American immigrants to endangered species to the use of the color blue in Renaissance painting.

Synopsis:

The worlds most acclaimed travel writer journeys through western Africa from Cape Town to the Congo.

Synopsis:

Following the success of the acclaimed Ghost Train to the Eastern Star and The Great Railway Bazaar, The Last Train to Zona Verde is an ode to the last African journey of the world's most celebrated travel writer.

“Happy again, back in the kingdom of light,” writes Paul Theroux as he sets out on a new journey through the continent he knows and loves best. Theroux first came to Africa as a twenty-two-year-old Peace Corps volunteer, and the pull of the vast land never left him. Now he returns, after fifty years on the road, to explore the little-traveled territory of western Africa and to take stock both of the place and of himself.

His odyssey takes him northward from Cape Town, through South Africa and Namibia, then on into Angola, wishing to head farther still until he reaches the end of the line. Journeying alone through the greenest continent, Theroux encounters a world increasingly removed from both the itineraries of tourists and the hopes of postcolonial independence movements. Leaving the Cape Town townships, traversing the Namibian bush, passing the browsing cattle of the great sunbaked heartland of the savanna, Theroux crosses “the Red Line” into a different Africa: “the improvised, slapped-together Africa of tumbled fences and cooking fires, of mud and thatch,” of heat and poverty, and of roadblocks, mobs, and anarchy. After 2,500 arduous miles, he comes to the end of his journey in more ways than one, a decision he chronicles with typically unsparing honesty in a chapter called “What Am I Doing Here?”

Vivid, witty, and beautifully evocative, The Last Train to Zona Verde is a fitting final African adventure from the writer whose gimlet eye and effortless prose have brought the world to generations of readers.

Synopsis:

This personal, lyrical narrative about storytelling and empathy from award winner Rebecca Solnit is a fitting companion to her beloved A Field Guide for Getting Lost

In this exquisitely written new book by the author of A Paradise Built in Hell, Rebecca Solnit explores the ways we make our lives out of stories, and how we are connected by empathy, by narrative, by imagination. In the course of unpacking some of her own stories—of her mother and her decline from memory loss, of a trip to Iceland, of an illness—Solnit revisits fairytales and entertains other stories: about arctic explorers, Che Guevara among the leper colonies, and Mary Shelley’s Dr. Frankenstein, about warmth and coldness, pain and kindness, decay and transformation, making art and making self. Woven together, these stories create a map which charts the boundaries and territories of storytelling, reframing who each of us is and how we might tell our story.

About the Author

Solnit is who Susan Sontag might have become if Sontag had never forsaken California for Manhattan. (San Francisco Chronicle)

Table of Contents

Contents

1. Among the Unreal People 1

2. The Train from Khayelitsha 14

3. Cape Town: The Spirit of the Cape 40

4. The Night Bus to Windhoek 59

5. Night Train from Swakopmund 79

6. The Bush Track to Tsumkwe 102

7. Ceremony at the Crossroads 118

8. Among the Real People 134

9. Riding an Elephant: The Ultimate Safari 160

10. The Hungry Herds at Etosha 180

11. The Frontier of Bad Karma 200

12. Three Pieces of Chicken 222

13. Volunteering in Lubango 242

14. The Slave Yards of Benguela 268

15. Luanda: The Improvised City 297

16. “This Is What the World Will Look Like When It Ends” 320

17. What Am I Doing Here? 333

Product Details

ISBN:
9780670034215
Subtitle:
My Ultimate African Safari
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Author:
Solnit, Rebecca
Author:
Theroux, Paul
Subject:
Artists, Architects, Photographers
Subject:
Philosophy
Subject:
North America
Subject:
Essays & Travelogues
Subject:
Arts
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
Africa
Edition Description:
Cloth
Publication Date:
20130507
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Pages:
368
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 1.23 lb
Age Level:
from 18

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Americana » Western States
Travel » Travel Writing » General

A Field Guide to Getting Lost
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 368 pages Viking Books - English 9780670034215 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

"Rebecca Solnit's marvelous new book of essays, A Field Guide to Getting Lost, is about the spaces between stability and risk, solitude, and the occasional claustrophobia of ordinary life. She explores the mysterious without puncturing the mystery, and that is a remarkable achievement indeed."

"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "The virtues of being open to new and transformative experiences are rhapsodized but not really illuminated in this discursive and somewhat gauzy set of linked essays. Cultural historian Solnit, an NBCC award winner for River of Shadows: Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West, allows the subject of getting lost to lead her where it will, from early American captivity narratives to the avant-garde artist Yves Klein. She interlaces personal and familial histories of disorientation and reinvention, writing of her Russian Jewish forebears' arrival in the New World, her experiences driving around the American west and listening to country music, and her youthful immersion in the punk rock demimonde. Unfortunately, the conceit of embracing the unknown is not enough to impart thematic unity to these essays; one piece ties together the author's love affair with a reclusive man, desert fauna, Hitchcock's Vertigo and the blind seer Tiresias in ways that will indeed leave readers feeling lost. Solnit's writing is as abstract and intangible as her subject, veering between oceanic lyricism ('Blue is the color of longing for the distance you never arrive in') and penses about the limitations of human understanding ('Between words is silence, around ink whiteness, behind every map's information is what's left out, the unmapped and unmappable') that seem profound but are actually banal once you think about them. Agent, Bonnie Nadell at Frederick Hill Assoc. (July 11)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review A Day" by , "A Field Guide to Getting Lost could be considered a very erudite sort of self-help book, dispensing, as it does, lessons such as, 'fear of making mistakes can itself be a huge mistake.' But it would be a shame to squeeze this book into a genre; it is a book brilliant in its connections and brave in its digressions. It is a book (of course it is) to get lost in." (read the entire Esquire review)
"Review" by , "Solnit not only thinks innovatively and writes beautifully, she also trips the wire in the mind that hushes the static of routine concerns and allows readers to perceive hidden aspects of life."
"Review" by , "Solnit is a distinctive and original writer....[A]lthough one might hesitate to call her a consummate prose stylist, her expressive, often beautiful writing finely conveys the force of her insights and vision. For the intrepid Blakean 'mental traveler' as well as for travelers of the physical realms, A Field Guide to Getting Lost is a book to set you wandering down strangely fruitful trails of thought."
"Review" by , "At its best, Solnit's writing in Getting Lost evokes some of the great writers of the West, especially the desert and its denizens: Edward Abbey, Willa Cather and, perhaps most of all, Mary Austin, with whom Solnit shares a feminist sensibility about the place of humans in the natural world."
"Synopsis" by , Written as a series of autobiographical essays, it draws on emblematic moments and relationships in Solnit's own life to explore issues of uncertainty, trust, loss, memory, desire, and place. While deeply personal, Solnit's book is not just a memoir, since her own stories link up with everything from the captivity narratives of early American immigrants to endangered species to the use of the color blue in Renaissance painting.
"Synopsis" by , The worlds most acclaimed travel writer journeys through western Africa from Cape Town to the Congo.
"Synopsis" by ,
Following the success of the acclaimed Ghost Train to the Eastern Star and The Great Railway Bazaar, The Last Train to Zona Verde is an ode to the last African journey of the world's most celebrated travel writer.

“Happy again, back in the kingdom of light,” writes Paul Theroux as he sets out on a new journey through the continent he knows and loves best. Theroux first came to Africa as a twenty-two-year-old Peace Corps volunteer, and the pull of the vast land never left him. Now he returns, after fifty years on the road, to explore the little-traveled territory of western Africa and to take stock both of the place and of himself.

His odyssey takes him northward from Cape Town, through South Africa and Namibia, then on into Angola, wishing to head farther still until he reaches the end of the line. Journeying alone through the greenest continent, Theroux encounters a world increasingly removed from both the itineraries of tourists and the hopes of postcolonial independence movements. Leaving the Cape Town townships, traversing the Namibian bush, passing the browsing cattle of the great sunbaked heartland of the savanna, Theroux crosses “the Red Line” into a different Africa: “the improvised, slapped-together Africa of tumbled fences and cooking fires, of mud and thatch,” of heat and poverty, and of roadblocks, mobs, and anarchy. After 2,500 arduous miles, he comes to the end of his journey in more ways than one, a decision he chronicles with typically unsparing honesty in a chapter called “What Am I Doing Here?”

Vivid, witty, and beautifully evocative, The Last Train to Zona Verde is a fitting final African adventure from the writer whose gimlet eye and effortless prose have brought the world to generations of readers.

"Synopsis" by ,
This personal, lyrical narrative about storytelling and empathy from award winner Rebecca Solnit is a fitting companion to her beloved A Field Guide for Getting Lost

In this exquisitely written new book by the author of A Paradise Built in Hell, Rebecca Solnit explores the ways we make our lives out of stories, and how we are connected by empathy, by narrative, by imagination. In the course of unpacking some of her own stories—of her mother and her decline from memory loss, of a trip to Iceland, of an illness—Solnit revisits fairytales and entertains other stories: about arctic explorers, Che Guevara among the leper colonies, and Mary Shelley’s Dr. Frankenstein, about warmth and coldness, pain and kindness, decay and transformation, making art and making self. Woven together, these stories create a map which charts the boundaries and territories of storytelling, reframing who each of us is and how we might tell our story.

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